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F.A. BOCHER Longer article Oct. 11, 1855 P. 2, Manitowoc Tribune


CHAS. BOCK Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


CHAS. BOCK Chas. Bock one of our most successful merchants is fond of branching out. He has established a store at Brillion. It is rumored that Charley Boettcher will have charge of the new enterprise. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3


CHAS. BOCK Chas. Bock, is making extensive repairs on his house on North 9th street. Nov. 10, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CHARLEY BOCK JR Charley Bock Jr. a business man of Clintonville visited his parents in this city last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 21, 1885 P.3


LEO BODDEN Mr. and Mrs. Leo Bodden, of Milwaukee, return home this morning, after a week’s visit at the residence of Mr. Henry Schmidt. Mrs. Bodden is a daughter of our esteemed ex-fellow citizen, Jno. F. Zinns, and passed the years of her childhood in our city. Aug. 23, 1883, Lakeshore Times


MRS. BODE Mrs. Bode of Two Rivers was visiting her daughter Mrs. Arthur Koepke, yesterday. Nov. 25, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HENRY BODE Mr. and Mrs. Charles Siebenorn have returned to Milwaukee after a brief visit at the home of Mrs. Siebtehorn's (sic) parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bode. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 29, 1916 P.3


JOHN BOEMER John Boemer, chairman of the town of Mishicott, was in the city yesterday. He was accompanied by Frank Halbery, one of the prominent farmers of that section. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 4


R. BODWIN, MRS. Mrs. R. Bodwin, a long time resident of Two Rivers, has moved to Chicago to live with her son. Dec. 15, 1904, Der Nord Westen


GUSTAV BOEDER Gustav Boeder celebrated his 39th birthday last Sat. among friends. Nov. 12, 1896, Der Nord Westen


MAX BOEHM Deputy Willinger to-day brought to the city Jos. Reithmeier, of the town of Franklin, who was arrested on a warrant sworn out sometime ago by Max Boehm, charging assault. Reithmeier was tried before Judge Craite and fined $10 and costs amounting to $28.50. Rather a costly lesson in pugilism. Mar. 29, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


AUGUSTA BOETTCHER Miss Augusta Boettcher of Menominee, Michigan is spending her holiday vacation at the home of her father Chas. Boettcher of Liberty. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 30, 1884 P.4


EMMA BOETTCHER Married In Chicago, at Grace Lutheran church by Rev. P. Hartman, Mr. Frank Burde to Miss Emma Boettcher. We hope the old saying "change the name and not the latter, wed for worse and not for better" will fail to be true in this case, for no young lady ever deserved more of the goods (sic) things of life than the lovely young bride mentioned above. The fortunate groom we have not the honor of knowing but doubt not he is a worthy choice. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 30, 1885 P.3


GUSTA BOETTCHER Miss Gusta Boetcher, of Eaton, braved the rain and the storm, and the muddy roads last Wednesday, to come to town and make arrangements with old Santa Claus, to call at her home on Christmas eve. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1 ******** Eaton news: Miss Gustie Boettcher is preparing her scholars for an exhibition to come off in the near future. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4 ******** Miss Gusta Boettcher of Liberty who has been teaching in Menominee came home to attend her sister's wedding. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 30, 1885 P.3


SIDONA BOETTGER The following estates were admitted to probate during the month of February, 1916: Joseph Drill; Isaac Halverson; Jacob Tossen; Morgan Connell; Mervin Geraldson; Ernst Vogelsang; Joseph Holly; Torger K. Hougen; Sidona Boettger; Mary F. Seidl; Simon Stok; Dorothea Schmidt; Rankchild Anderson; Joseph Thalhammer; Catherine Lenerville. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 4, 1916 P.5


MRS. BOHN Two Rivers news: The Lake House in this city, which has been managed so long and efficiently by Mrs. Bohn, was sold to Peter Rau, of Mishicott, the other day. Six thousand dollars is, we understand, the consideration which will make Mr. Rau the lanndlord (sic) of the best hotel in town. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 4


CHAS. BOHN Chas. Bohn of Deadwood, South Dakota, who was born and raised in Two Rivers, is visiting his native city after a 25-year absence. Dec. 24, 1908, Der Nord Westen


HENRY BOHN Edwards news: Martin Stollzman and Henry Bohne, both young farmers of Meeme, sold their farms this week. The former sold his to his neighbor, Mr. Kamman; the later sold his to his father; the former received the neat and desirable sum of $7,000 for his; what the figures were in the other case we were unable to learn. Both are now contemplating removing to Iowa, where they will re-enter farming on a much more comprehensive scale. Success is what their friends who have shared their society for years, and who now regret their proposed departure wish them in their new fields of labor. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 4 ******** Edwards news: On next Monday Henry Bohn will sell at auction all is portable valuables, and then bid adieu to his friends and start for his new home, which he has already secured, in the west. Unlimited happiness and unbounded success are what we wish him in his new land. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 13, 1881 P. 4


MRS. J.C. BOHN Mishicot News: Mr. Peter Rau has pruchased the Lake House in Two Rivers, formerly owned by Mrs. J.C. Bohn and will remove there soon. He has sold his village property, including water-power, to B. Soenksen. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 10, 1882 P. 4


JOHNNIE BOHN Two Rivers news: Johnnie Bohn will leave during the present week for Madison to become one of the Senate messenger boys. This is the third winter that Jehnnie (sic) has been called upon to do service in the Hall of State, which fact would seem to indicate that he does his work in the Capitol City in his usually energetic manner. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 4


MR. BOHNE Edwards news: Wm. Wilke, of Eaton, Moritz Rossberg, of Centerville, and Martin Stolzman, of Meeme, will at different times during the next few weeks, sell their personal property at public auction. Anton Schad, the celebrated auctioneer of Schleswig, who last year earned $280 as auctioneer, will sell on all these occasions. In the spring Mr. Wilkes will go to Nebraska, Mr. Stoltzman will follow Mr. Bohne to Iowa, and Mr. Rossberg will cross the sea to again view Germany, the land of his birth. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 21, 1882 P. 10


J.H. BOHNE J.H. Bohne, one of Memee's pioneers, chatted with old settlers in the city last Wednesday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 4, 1881 P.1


JOHN BOLDT Gills Corners news: John Boldt spent a day in Clintonville last week where he settled with the railroad company for injuries which he received in the train wreck. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, March 28, 1916 P.4


CHARLEY BOLUS When the hot days of summer come to remember that Charley Bolus, at Moselar's old place, is prepared to furnish you with a cooling dish of ice cream. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 1, 1875


FRANK BOLDUS Two Rivers news: A number of new buildings have been erected in this city lately. Frank Boldus' new butcher shop and F. Havel's new residence both present a very creditable appearance. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


WILLIE BOLDUS (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 30 June) Young Willie Boldus of Two Rivers has taken a job in a butcher shop in Escanaba. July 4, 1901, Der Nord Westen


JOHN BOLEN John Bolen celebrated his 63rd birthday yesterday. Mar. 18, 1897, Der Nord Westen


CARL BOLLE Kossuth news: Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bolle have retuned after spending a week at Antigo visiting with the former's parents. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, February 25, 1916 P.5


ARTHUR BOLZENTHAL TWO MANITOWOC CO. BOYS IN CASUALTY LISTS TODAY; BOTH AS SEVERELY WOUNDED Names of two more Manitowoc county boys are given in the casualty lists released by the war department today, both men being listed as “wounded severely.” Arthur Bolzenthal, who was sent to Camp Custer from Two Rivers, having made his home there at the time of his call to service is one of the men and Henry Stedje, of Grimms is the second. Both men were members of the national army before they crossed seas. Relatives were notified by telegraph of the wounding of the two boys. Dec. 17, 1918, Manitowoc Herald News


JOHN BONIN John Bonin of Town Manitowoc will celebrate his 79th birthday tomorrow. Dec. 18, 1890, Der Nord Westen


MRS. JOHN BONK Mrs. John Bonk, Two Rivers, died suddently of heart failure Wednesday aged, 34 years. The family formerly resided at Sheboygan. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, September 3, 1903 P. 1


MARTIN BONK BREAKS OUT AFRESH. Smallpox Takes New Lease on Life in the City and Claims Five Patients DISEASE NOT STAMPED OUT. Children in Family of Martin Bonk, Franklin Street, Afflicted - The Home Under Quarantine. Five children, in the family of Martin Bonk, ranging in ages from 5 to 19 years, are afflicted with smallpox and the home at the corner of Franklin and Fifteenth streets has been placed under quarantine restrictions that are severe in measure to prevent the contagion from spreading outside the family. The condition at the Bonk home was reported this morning, although the illness of three in the family existed a week previous. There are ten inmates of the house and the exposure has not been limited to the confines of the premises. Of the five patients but one has been employed in labor, the eldest son having worked in a factory until within a few days ago. The father is employed by a local Brewing concern and although not himself afflicted has been exposed during the week that his children were ill before the nature of the disease was discovered. Every protection has been thrown about the home to confine the contagion on the premises and it is not believed that there is any cause for alarm. The new lease on life which has been taken by the disease is not pleasing to health officers whose conscientious efforts it was thought had tended to suppression of the pest. It is manifestly evident that Manitowoc has not concluded its experience with smallpox and a great care should be exercised and assistance given officers to combat the condition. According to the report made to State Board of Health for the past week the disease has lessened its grip on more than one hundred patients, there being at present but 279 cases reported. Smallpox is, however, epidemic throughout the United States and Europe and there has been an effort on the part of health officers throughout the countries to perfect plans that may successfully combat the disease. All the larger cities of the East are afflicted and the condition has become largely alarming. In Wisconsin there has been a very successful treatment of smallpox that it is hoped will soon eradicate it. In the meantime the public is anxiously awaiting betterment. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, February 10, 1902 P.1


EDW. BORCHERDT Edw. Borcherdt, a son of F.C. Borcherdt, proprietor of Hotel Victoria, has taken a position as surveyor for the Chicago Northwestern Railroad and will be working in South Dakota. Aug. 2, 1906, Der Nord Westen


FR. BORCHERDT Obituary. Died, in Chemintz, Saxony, on the 4th ult., after an illness of two weeks, Fr. Borcherdt, aged 97 years. The sad intelligence of the death of our grandfather, at his advanced age, was not unlooked for. It seems as though by an interposition of Providence it was appointed that our father, after a lapse of 22 years, should again be permitted to see hin [sic] in the full enjoyment of health only two or three weeks before his death, and be present to comfort and stay his aged mother in her affliction. We tender our sympathy to those more directly afflicted than we in the decrease of one who through life was honored and beloved as only the truly good can be. Manitowoc Tribune, Dec. 17, 1874


FRED BORCHERDT Fred Borcherdt met with a slight mishap Saturday evening which might have proved quite serious. He was walking along Eighth street in front of the Guttmann building when he was attracted by some article in the show window. In stepping over to look at it more closely he did not notice an open hatchway or trap-door which had been left open a moment while somebody went down for fuel. The young man fell into the cellar and sustained severe bruises and one or two ugly cuts. But no serious injury was done and he may well feel thankful that his is not nursing broken bones. Oct. 24, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN BORCHERDT John Borcherdt is here from Chicago for the wedding anniversary celebration of his parents. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, October 21, 1903 P. 2


REINHOLD BORCHERDT Reinhold Borcherdt, a nephew of F.C. Borcherdt here, was recently badly injured in Kaukauna where he works for the Chicago Northwestern Railroad. He was holding a chisel which another worker struck with a large hammer. The blow was not true so the chisel flew from Borcherdt's hand and struck him in the head, fracturing his skull and almost severing his ear. He is in serious condition. Aug. 2, 1906, Der Nord Westen


MRS. BORCHERT On Sun. Mrs. Borchert, widow of our late American Consul in Livorno, celebrated her 90th birthday. Her children, grandchildren, and great- grandchildren gathered to celebrate. June 15, 1899, Der Nord Westen


AUGUST BORN Collins news: Damage in the fire of last week here has been estimated to amount to approximately $30,000. The furniture store and residence of Louis T. Voigt, which was totally destroyed, was only recently remodeled and just a few days before a shipment of furniture valued at about $3,000 had been received and stored in the building. The implement shop owned by August Born was totally destroyed, but the actual loss was not very great. Rebuilding of the ruined section, it is believed, will be begun in the near future. Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, May 04, 1928 Page 3


JOHN BORN It is reported from Town Schleswig that John Born, an old and well-to-do resident, has been missing without a trace since 23 Nov. His relatives are doing everything possible to find him. It is said that he had been quite affected by the fact that his son had recently been committed to the state mental facility in Oshkosh. Dec. 4, 1902, Der Nord Westen


JOSEPH BORN (From the correspondent in Kiel, 05 Jan.) Several birthdays have been celebrated – Joseph Born, his 30th. Jan. 7, 1897, Der Nord Westen


JOHN BORNESKY TWO RIVERS IS SCENE OF COSTLY BENZINE BLAST (Special to Press/Telegram) Two Rivers - A benzine explosion in the No. 1 plant of the Aluminum Goods company at 5 o'clock Tuesday evening did serious damage in the plant and burned three employees. The injured: John Bornesky - burns about face and eyes. James Teche - face, hair and hands burned. William Gloe - slightly burned. Benzine is employed in cleaning aluminum. Fortunately the amount on hand on the floor was relatively small or the damage would have been serious, probably fatal to many of the 45 employes in the room. The force of the explosion can be seen by the fact that the steel window frames in the room were blown out and twisted. The room measures 60 x 120 feet and windows on all sides were affected. 14 Feb. 1923, Sheboygan Press-Telegram


HEINRICH BOSHARDT (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 27 Mar.) On Fri. Heinrich Boshardt here celebrated his 79th birthday in the company of relatives and friends. His children attended the happy event – Hermann Boshardt of Chicago, Frank Boshardt of Weyauwega, Mrs. Minna Boshardt, Mrs. August Boshardt and her son, Mr. Ed. Mueller and children, Wm. Boshardt with his wife and children and Mrs. Wiegardt. Heinrich Boshardt, the birthday child, who belongs among the old settlers of our city, has gone through many storms here. At one time he worked in the chair factory and then ran a cabinet maker shop. More recently he has operated a tavern connected with a dance hall, and has done a good business. Several years ago he sold the building to the Hamilton Manufacturing Co., and he retired. His wife died many years ago. Mr. Boshardt has always enjoyed great affection, and his many friends wished him the best of luck at his birthday celebration. Mar. 30, 1905, Der Nord Westen


HENRY BOSSHART Henry Bosshart of Two Rivers celebrated his 70th birthday on Tues. of last week. Apr. 2, 1896, Der Nord Westen


F.M. BOUCHER In Justice court, Manitowoc County-Town of Manitowoc. TO F.M. BOUCHER-You are hereby notified, that a warrant of attachment has been issued against you, and your property attached to satisfy the demand of James P. Glover, amounting to seventy nine 13-100 dollars. Now unless you shall appear before George N. Woodin, a Justice of the Peace, in and for said county, at his office in said town, on the 29th day of August, A.D., 1859, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, Judgment will be rendered against you, and your property sold to pay the debt. Dated this 23th day of July, A.D. 1859 James P. Glover, Plaintiff. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, August 5, 1859 P.3 ********* In Justice Court. Manitowoc county-Town of Manitowoc. TO F.M. BOUCHER-You are hereby notified that a warrant of attachment has been issued against you, and your property attached to satisfy the demand of Peleg Glover, amounting to forty six 89-100 dollars. Now unless you shall appear before George N. Woodin, a Justice of the Peace, in and for said county, at his office in said town, on the 29th day of August, A.D. 1859, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, judgement will be rendered against you and your property sold to pay the debt. Dated this 28th day of July, A.D., 1859. Peleg Glover, Plaintiff. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, August 5, 1859 P.3


MRS. H. BOUM Mrs. Dora Wilson of New Orleans, La., will arrive in the city this week to spend a few days with her sister, Mrs. H. Boum, of this city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 12, 1916 P.3


F. BOUN F. Boun and Miss Minnie Steinhauer, both of Two Rivers, were quietly married some time ago and kept the affair a secret from their parents until last Sunday. A celebration of the event was held at that time. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, January 18, 1899 P. 4 ******** (Note: I can find nothing in Manitowoc county, it's possible they got married in an adjoining county.


EDMUND BOURCHAINE Two Rivers news: Edmund Bourchaine, of this city, returned home on Wednesday last from Chicago, where he has been engaged in the life-saving service, during the past season. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 14, 1882 P. 4


CHAS. BOURILL Mr. Chas. Bourill, was at Tisch Mills yesterday attending the wedding of his niece Miss Anna Sladky. Nov. 10, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** Charles Bouril, local agent for the Maxwell car, has received a post card from Andrew Johnson who is at San Bernardo, Cal., attending the Orange Growers' convention. An automobile convention is also being held there and Mr. Johnson says that he had a view of the Maxwell car which had just completed a 22,000 trip on a non-stop run. He says the car, aside from being in need of a washing, was in good condition and without a "rattle." Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 1916 P.8


EDWARD BOURISH Maple Grove news: J.D. Nate is planing to remodel his cheese factory this summer and will install a whey skimmer. Wm. O'Neil has ben (sic) secured as cheese maker with Edward Bourish as assistant. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 3, 1916 P.5


MRS. DAN BOWLER Mrs. Dan Bowler and family departed for Sparta this morning where they will spend several days with relatives. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 23, 1916 P.3


HANS BOYER Last Sunday afternoon about thirty members of the newly organized Cleveland Club of Mishicott marched out to Hans Boyers' superb ranch, headed by a bugler and the Star Spangled Banner. Each man was disguised in a white plug hat and heavily armed with a stout walking stick. They captured the ranch by one bold assault and then swore in Boyer as commissary. He had to tap about half a dozen of his best cream cheeses to wash down the beer that they had ordered sent out from the village. It was really wonderful to see how much bread and cheese and beer some of those thick waisted burghers could hold. John Terens and the Elder Levenhagen took the prize for abdominal capacity but Isaac Craite would have been awarded first prize if it had not been suspected that he had not fed fair. It was asserted, and with a show of truth, that he had not the room to hold as much as Levenhagen or Terens and therefore it was impossible for him to have consumed as much. But "pshaw!" he said, "a man don't eat with his belly, he eats with his mouth and I have a bigger mouth than either of "em." Still he was ruled out by the committee and he consoled himself with more bread and cheese and beer. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), July 3, 1888


MR. BRAASCH MISHICOTT In company of Mr. Fischbein, of the Badger State Manufacturing Co., we took a drive into the country last Wednesday, directing our first to the village of Mishicott, where he made a short stop, and then proceeded to the beautiful and fertile farming region which lies to the north and east of that busy little burg. The farms located along the road which we traveled are said to equal any in the county in point of soil; and the tidy appearance of the barns and farm houses which we passed certainly indicated thrift and prosperity on the part of the farmers. We saw several fields of winter wheat during one drive which looked exceedingly fine. Most of the spring wheat which was up also looked flourishing. The village of Mishicott is a handsome little town, and deserves a more extended notice than we are able to give it at present; but we shall endeavor to do it justice at some future time. It has a good water-power, a flour-mill, a blacksmith shop, two churches, and a fine large school house. Hitching our horse at the hotel of which Mr. Damon is the popular landlord, we gave that gentleman a short call. Afterwards we called on Mr. Heyroth, who is doing a large mercantile business there; on Selk & Son, who have a large store and are doing a splendid business, and on Mr. John Terens, who also has a large store and deals in hardware. We looked wistfully over the river where J. Linstedt's large brewery looms up, but were unable to visit the vaults as we would like to have done had we had time. Mr. Linstedt has the reputation of making excellent beer, and from the sample we got at A.C. Terens' we should say that he deserves it. Mr. F. Zander, owns a hotel in the village which is quite a popular resort, but for want of time we failed to give him a call, as was also the case with Mr. Braasch, who keeps a hotel and saloon on the southern outskirts of the village. We noticed several new buildings, going up, which indicate that the village is neither dead nor sleeping, but full of life and activity. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 1, 1875


F. BRAASCH, DAUGHTER (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 12 June) Mrs. J. Dawley, of Los Angeles, California, spent a day last week in our village visiting old friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Dawley, the daughter of Mr. F. Braasch, was born and raised here, but following the death of her husband about 15 years ago, moved to Los Angeles to be with her only son who was then studying medicine there and is now a doctor with his own practice. Her many friends were pleased to see Mrs. Dawley. June 17, 1909, Der Nord Westen


TOMMY BRAASCH BOYS WHO SET OUT TO SEE WORLD, BACK IN DAY, HUNGRY AND PENITENT JUDGE IS TOLD With tears streaming down his face, a manly looking little youth of 12 summers told county Judge John Chloupek this morning that he had lost all desire to roam and likewise all desire to ride a bicycle. He was Tommy Braasch, 908 So. Twentieth street, who with Gilbert Meisner, 14 year old Manitowoc Route 1 boy, left the home of their parents at 7 o'clock Monday night on a tour 'of the world.' Hungry, foot and back sore, the two were picked up at 10 o'clock last night by Sheriff Beduhn and Deputy Charles Ladwig as they were wearily trudging their way along Highway 141 about eight miles north of the city at 10 o'clock last night. According to the story sobbed out by young Braasch, he and the Meisner boy, on a purloined bicycle, left the city, bound for the north. That night they reached Francis Creek and spent the night in the garage building of the church. Bright and early Tuesday morning they started for Green Bay, arriving there about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Meisner doing all the peddling up and down the hills, with Braasch uncomfortably squirming on the handle-bars. They spent the day in Green Bay but the pangs of hunger drove them homeward and they started the return trek to Manitowoc. Frequently drawing up their belts, as Tommy says "I tell you Judge, we had to pull our belts up pretty often" the youthful adventurers started for home but at Denmark were too tired to continue much father. They saw a woman and told her of their hunger and she gave each of them a piece of pie. Re-enforced physically and spiritually, the homeward ride was resumed and continued until they were picked up by the sheriff and brought to the city and their parents notified. Nothing to eat except apples they could pick up along the way and the one piece of pie in almost twenty-four hours after they left home is nothing for a growing boy according to young Braasch and he will never again roam, he said. And he never wants to sit on a bicycle. "I'm so sore from sitting on the handle bars Judge," he said this morning. Braasch was taken to his home by his mother but Meisner was being detained until it could be learned where he secured a gun and a revolver which he had when he left Manitowoc. The revolver was still in his possession when he was brought to the city. The boys slept the sleep of the just last night and today were none the worse for their experiences but are sadder and wiser boys. "They're just regular boys," Judge Chloupek said this morning after the story had been told. Manitowoc Herald News, Wednesday, August 29, 1928 Page 5


ARTHUR BRADL, MRS. Mrs. Arthur Bradl, who has been spending several months here departed today for Portland, Ore., to join Mr. Bradl who returned to the west some time ago. Feb. 23, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRANK BRADLEY Cooperstown news: After an absence of almost four years, which he spent in the West, Frank Bradley returned to his home here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 15, 1916 P.4


MICHAEL BRADLEY Withdrawal of Reward. In March, 1854, the undersigned were shot and badly wounded by the discharge of a gun in the hands of one Patrick Hunter, who fled and escaped the penalty of the law, and we offered a Reward of $100 for his arrest. This is to give notice to all concerned, that we do hereby withdraw said offer of Reward, and that we will not consider ourselves bound hereafter to pay it. PETER YORE, MICHAEL BRADLEY. Cooperstown, Manitowoc Co., Dec. 21, 1859. Dec. 30, 1859 P. 3, The Manitowoc Pilot


MIKE AND GEORGE BRADLEY Cooperstown news: Mr. Mike and George Bradley, drove down to Centerville one day last week with their fast horse and new cutter. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2


MRS. TOM BRADLEY Denmark news: Mrs. Tom Bradley of Cooperstown is preparing to erect a barn on her farm this summer to replace the one which was destroyed by fire two years ago when St. James church was burned. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 5, 1916 P.4


ALICE BRADY Miss Alice Brady, who teaches at Cleveland, this county, was here to spend the week end, returning this morning. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 22, 1916 P.3


CHAS. A. BRADY Attorneys Albert Hougen and Chas. A. Brady have former (sic) a co-partnership for the practice of law under the firm name of Hougen and Brady. The two have occupied the same offices for some time. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, June 1, 1904 P. 1


JOSEPH BRADY, MRS. LOCAL PEOPLE MAY SHARE IN ESTATE WORTH MILLIONS MRS. JAMES MCNULTY AND DAUGHTER MAY HAVE PART IN ESTATE OF THOMAS CRUSE, WEALTHY MONTANA MAN Two Manitowoc women may share in the estate of the late Thomas Cruse, millionaire mine owner and banker, whose death occurred at Helena, Mont., a few days ago, inquiries having been received from attorney’s in the west as to heirs here. The estate is said to be valued at more than $5,000,000 and Mrs. Cruse left no immediate family. Mrs. James McNulty, a pioneer resident of the town of Liberty, is an aunt of the deceased Montana man and with her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Brady, of this city, are probably among the heirs to the estate which Mr. Cruse had amassed in a life spent in the mining country of the west. It is understood that Mr. Cruse left no will, and in this event the estate will go to his nearest of kin, among whom are Mrs. McNulty and her daughter, who will probably receive a large share in the estate as it is not known that there are many relatives surviving. Notice of the death of Mr. Cruse has been received by Mrs. Brady and an inquiry will be made as to the estate which is represented by bank stock, bonds and ownership of mines in the west. Representatives of Mrs. Brady were not inclined to discuss the matter today, though it was said that in all probability Mrs. Brady and her mother would share in the estate. Mr. Cruse had been a resident of Montana for many years having located there during the early mining days and had amassed a large fortune. Mrs. McNulty had been in touch with members of her family and Mr. Cruse in late years and at his death, news was sent here. Inquiries are now being made by attorneys and if Mr. Cruse left no will local heirs will undoubtedly establish a claim to part of the estate. Mrs. Brady is the wife of Joseph Brady who conducts a milk route in the city. Feb. 23, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOACHIN BRAKER NOTICE Is hereby given that my wife Wallbarga, has left my bed and board, and I forbid any one harboring or trusting her on my account, for I shall pay no debts of her contracting after this date. JOACHIN BRAKER. Town of Newton, Manitowoc, Co. Sept. 16th 1854. Sept. 30, 1854, Manitowoc Tribune


J.L. BRANDEIS Mr. J.L. Brandeis, of Manitowoc, has recently filled his store, located on York street, with a large and well selected stock of Spring Goods, which he invites people of this county to call and examine. He makes a specialty of ready-made clothing, and now has on hand a large supply of spring suits for men, youths, and boys, made up in the latest style. Suits for farmers, mechanics and laboring men at extremely low prices. May 11, 1875, Manitowoc Chronicle


J.L. BRANDEIS My entire stock must be sold within the next 30 days, as I have made arrangements to leave this city. I also offer for sale my store building, horse and buggy, and household furniture. J. L. Brandeis. May 6, 1884, The Lakeshore Times


JACOB BRANDIES Jacob Brandies, of Milwaukee, brother of our fellow townsman, J.L. Brandeis (sic), was in the city on Monday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


CHARLES A. BRANDT Chas. A. Brandt, the erstwhile reporter of the HERALD, is seventeen years of age to-day and in honor of the event he is holding a quiet celebration. Just notice. June 23, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. CHARLES BRANDT Mrs. Charles Brandt recently had a double celebration, both her Wooden Wedding Anniversary and her 26th birthday, celebrated with friends and acquaintances. May 30, 1895, Der Nord Westen


JOHN BRANDT John Brandt, the ice man, is celebrating his birthday today. Mar. 14, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN BRANDT John Brandt has returned here from Chicago, where he has been employed for a year past, and will again take up his home in the city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, August 22, 1904 P. 1


JOHN BRANDT MAN NEAR DEATH IN AUTO-MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT HENRY BURGER, MOTORCYCLIST, SAVED BY FACT THAT BRANDT’S AUTOMOBILE WAS RUNABOUT AND A LIGHT MACHINE BURGER ON WAY TO COURT FOR SPEEDING Henry Burger, of the Burger Ship Building company, owes his life to the fact that John Brandt, salesman for the Schmidtman Sons company, drives a light runabout instead of a heavy touring car. Brandt’s car passed over Burger’s body in a mishap today but the fact that the car was a light one saved Burger as had the car been a heavy one the young man would probably have been killed. The accident, which sent Burger to a physician with a gash in his leg and his body severely bruised, though his injuries are not serious, happened at Jay and Tenth street this morning when Burger, riding a motorcycle on Tenth and Brandt driving his car on Jay, turning onto Tenth came together when Burger attempted to circle around the automobile which turned onto Tenth from Jay going south. Burger was riding north on Tenth and when the Brandt car rounded the corner, Burger became confused and in attempting to avoid the automobile, ran into its path and there was a crash. Burger with his machine was thrown to the pavement and the automobile passed over his body and the machine. Had the machine been a heavy one Burger would undoubtedly have sustained serious if not fatal injuries. The motorcycle was damaged but the Brandt car was uninjured and Mr. Brandt, aside from a shaking up, escaped unhurt. Drivers of both machines probably became confused which caused the accident although according to reports, Burger was at fault in attempting to change his course which led Brandt to make a shorter turn than he appeared to have intended to do. Burger was assisted by Mr. Brandt and bystanders and was taken to the office by Dr. G.W. Patchen who happened to pass shortly after the accident. Though Burger was not seriously injured he is badly bruised and will be laid up for ten days. Burger it is said, was on his way to the police station in response to a notice that complaint had been made against him for alleged speeding. The complaint will have to wait a few days until Burger is able to be about. April 29, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


WILLIAM F. BRANDT William F. Brandt is celebrating his 37th birthday by wrestling with an attack of the grip. Feb. 15, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** W.F. Brandt returned from a visit at Chicago to his son John Brandt who is employed in the printing department of the Siegel & Cooper store. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, December 28, 1903 P. 1 ******** W.F. Brandt, head of the Brandt Printing and Binding company, is today receiving the congratulations of friends, the day being his fifty-fourth birthday anniversary. "Capt. Bille" has been engaged in the printing business in this city for many years and is one of the popular members of the county board. Feb. 15, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


P.J. BRANIGAN NOTICE. My Son Foster is in the habit of obtaining Goods etc. upon my account, representing that I have sent for them. From and after this date, I will pay no debts of his contracting, as he has left my house and has refused to be subject to my control. P.J. BRANIGAN. Manitowoc, July 28th, 1854 Aug. 5, 1854 P. 1, Manitowoc Tribune


JOHN BRANM Two Rivers news: John Branm(sic) our popular photographer has his new photograph gallery and jewelry shop on Washington street completed. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.2


HENRY BRATZ Marriage licenses have been issued by County Clerk Auton to the following: Henry Bratz of Rockland and Minnie Schultz of Cooperstown. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, February 2, 1916 P.3


FRANK BRAUN Mr. Frank Braun lately host of the Kewaunee House, Kewaunee, has arrived at Reedsville where he will reside permanently. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 3, 1885 P.6


JOHN BRAUN Rumor says that John Braun, our jovial and deservedly popular jeweler and photographer, is soon to be a widower no mre. Full particulars will be given in due time. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 14, 1882 P. 4


MRS. R.C. BRAUN Mrs. R.C. Braun of Town Line celebrated her 75th birthday Thurs. last week in the company of friends. She came to this county in 1849 with her now 85-yr. old husband and has always lived on the same farm. Oct. 19, 1899, Der Nord Westen


HERMANN BRAUNEL ACCIDENT. We regret to learn of a terrible accident to Mr. Hermann Braunel who lives near the Rapids. While working on a power feed cutter his hand was caught in the rollers and his arm drawn in, crushing the bone and terribly lacerating the flesh. The arm was amputated above the elbow by Drs. Frazer and Luhman and in spite of the severe shock the injured man is doing as well as can be expected under the circumstances. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 3, 1885 P.6


CHARLEY BRAUSE The New Billard Saloon.-By the new advertisement in another column, it will be seen that Charley Brause has change his quarters,and is now located in the brick building, adjoining the National. Charley has also taken a new partner, in the person of John P. Arnold, and if both Charley Brause and Johnny Arnold cannot keep an establishment worthy of the patronage of those who love good billiards, good eating, and good so-and-so, nobody else need try. Their room is large and comfortable, and their accommodations of the first class. Dec. 30, 1859 P. 3, The Manitowoc Pilot


REV. H.T. BRAY We publish in another place the letter of resignation of Rev. H.T. Bray. Dr. Bray is a scholarly gentleman and his departure from our city will be generally regretted. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 16, 1886 P.3


A.J. BRAZMEIER A.J. Brazmeier of the Central Iron Works claims to be the first man to make the trip via auto to Silver Lake and back this spring, completing a trip fought with considerable hardship, yesterday afternoon. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, March 30, 1916 P.8


INGA BREDESON OSULD BREDESON Mrs. G.A. Sundby of Rio, and Miss Inga Bredeson were here for a visit with their brother, Osuld Bredeson here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, March 13, 1916 P.3


ARTHUR J. BREHM SHEBOYGAN MAN WHO RECENTLY CAME HERE TO LOCATE, WEDS FOND DU LAC GIRL THERE YESTERDAY Arthur J. Brehn (sic), who recently came here from Sheboygan to accept a position as pharmacist at the Henry Hinrich company store, was married at Sheboygan yesterday to Miss Margaret Deener, of Fond du Lac, the wedding being quietly celebrated. Mr. and Mrs. Brehm will arrive here this evening to take up their home. Mr. Brehm, though a new comer in the city, has won a circle of friends who will extend a welcome to his bride. The wedding is the outgrowth of a friendshp formed at Sheboygan. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, March 28, 1916 P.5


ARTHUR BREHM Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Brehm were at Sheboygan to spend the week end with Mr. Brehm's relatives. Mr. Brehm returned here last night, while Mrs. Brehm ocntinued (sic) to Fond du Lac where she will visit with her parents for a week. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 22, 1916 P.3


ARNOLD BREHMER COLLINS LAD SAFE GERMAN PRISON CAMP Associated Press dispatches to the Herald-News today carried the news that Arnold Brehmer, of Collins, this county, who several weeks ago was reported missing in action on the west front in France, is alive and well in a German prison camp. The name of the camp where Brehmer is held is not given out. Oct. 22, 1918, Manitowoc Herald News


BARTEL M. BREIDER Notice. I hereby warn all persons that any debts or liabilities whatever which may hereafter be contracted by my son August Breider will not be paid or recognized by me in any manner, he having left my house without just cause or provocation. Mishicott, Jan. 11, 1882 Bartel M. Breider. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 7, 1882 P.4


BREMER Responsibility for the wreck in the C.&N.W. yards has been fixed and Bremer, a youth employed to tend the switch lamps will likely be given his discharge, it being said that he threw the switch in a belief that it had been left open by mistake. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 2, 1904 P. 1


FRITZ BREMER "Upon my move from Manitowoc to Chicago, I want to wish all of my friends and acquaintances, a hearty goodbye." Mar. 25, 1880, Der Nord Westen


HENRY BREMER PART IN GERMANY, MEET HERE FIRST TIME AFTER 66 YRS. HAPPY REUNION OF CHILDHOOD PLAYMATES, WHO ARE COUSINS, BEING HELD AT THE HOME OF H. BREMER, THIS CITY TODAY Cousins and childhood playmates, who parted in Germany sixty-six years ago, met for the first time in more than three decades yesterday in this city when William Garvidenk, a prosperous farmer of South Dakota, arrived in the city to visit Henry Bremer, Michigan avenue. Another cousin of the two, Mrs. Laura Kimball of Chicago, is also here and a reunion that is a happy one is being held at the Bremer home today. Sixty-six years ago today Mr. Bremer and Mr. Garvidenk, cousins, were residents of a small city in Germany and attended school and played together. Garvidenk, the older of the two boys, with his parents, left Germany to come to America and the family later located in South Dakota where he has since been a resident. Mr. Bremer's family left Germany some time later and located in the country and some years ago Mr. Bremer came here to make his home. Though he had corresponded with his cousin, the playmate of his childhood days, the two had never met after coming here but a few weeks ago Mr. Garvidenk in a letter here, said that he planned to visit Mr. Bremer during the holidays and since that time the two have been planning the meeting. When Mr. Garvidenk stepped from the Northwestern train at the station here last night, Mr. Bremer, advised of his coming, was on hand to meet him and though the two had no idea of the appearance of the other there was almost immediate recognition on the part of Mr. Bremer. The two men, whose memory of boyhood friendship had been cherished, threw their arms about each other and the scene was affecting, and passengers at the station, who witnessed the meeting were interested in the reunion of the two which was revealed by Mr. Bremer in response to inquiry made. Mrs. Kimball who is here from Chicago to join with Messr's Bremer and Garvidenk in the reunion, was also a resident of Germany when the two men were boys. She has resided at Chicago for years and has visited here on previous occasions, though never having met Mr. Garvidenk since his departure from Germany sixty odd years ago. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, December 08, 1915, Page 1


WILLIAM BREMER The Rambler automobile recently purchased by William Bremer is being driven about town and is attracting a great deal of attention. The machine is a pretty car and is adapted for country touring. The machine will be used for exhibition purposes by the Schumacher Cycle Co. for a time. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 13, 1904 P. 1


MARY BRENMAN Manitowoc County has sixteen students in the Normal School at Oshkosh, being excelled in number only by Fond du Lac, Sheboygan, Kenosha and Winnebago counties. The names of the students from this county are: Martin McMahon, Osman; Oscar F. Huhn, St. Wendel; Fred W. Broer and Louis A. Kahlenberg, Two Rivers; Andrew Gilbertson, Rube; Henry Wernecke, Chas. Groth, Henry Groth, Newtonburg; J.E. Hewitt, Greenstreet; Wm. M Degenhart, Manitowoc; Lewis A. Schmitz, Herman A. Schmitz, Nordheim; Mary Brenman, Cato, Clara Wigen, Clarks Mills; Michael Mulcahey, Maple Grove; Pauline E. Heins, Kiel. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 6, 1886 P.3


DAN BRENNAN Gills Corners news: Dan Brennan sold his saloon at Wayside to Frank Pfeffer for $3,200. Frank is now in possession. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.4


MR. BRESLER A FLAGMAN NEEDED. Last evening as Messrs. Guttman and Bresler were taking a drive they reached the hill by Mr. Truman's around which the railroad track curves. Seeing the track clear and hearing no noise of engines they trotted down the hill. Just as they came upon the track a hand car ran into the horse breaking two of his legs. The occupants of the buggy were thrown out but not injured. This point on the track is always a dangerous one when approached from the west as the hill conceals the track from the occupants of a vehicle on the road. A flagman is kept there at the time of trains, but this accident shows a guard should be constantly stationed there. The horse was a valuable one and belonged to Cootway and Herzog. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


CHAS. BRESSLER MANITOWOC AT MILWAUKEE. SOME OF THE CLIPPERS WHO NOW RESIDE IN CREAM CITY. Roaming around Milwaukee one afternoon of last week, we came across many whose faces where familiar; and thinking their fortunes might be of interest to our readers, we jotted down the names of some: Chas. Bressler, entered the employ of Wellauer Bros., and was soon started on a new route along the lake shore in Michigan. He was so successful and gave such satisfation that he has been again employed by the same firm with still better prospects. The Times prophecies that "Bros" will make one of the most successful "drummers" sent out by any firm in Milwaukee. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 7, 1882 P.4 (Note: There were many named so the article has been posted with each one named)


CHARLES BRESSLER Mrs. Mary Willman, who arrived here last evening from Europe on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bressler, after an absence of twenty-eight years, will spend the summer visiting in the state. She is accompanied by her daughter, Miss Greta. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 30, 1902, Page 2


CHARLEY BRESSLER "Home, Sweet Home." news: Charley Bressler is contented since he is on the road for the well known firm of Wellaner & Co. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


FRANK BRESSLER If Oscar Alter were not saying so much about himself and the nice things he has in the papers now a days, we would mention that his drug store is a very popular place for our local artists to exhibit their art work. A few weeks ago Frank Bressler showed a very natural looking picture of a boy with a ragged hat, and there was'nt (sic) a boy in Manitowoc who did'nt (sic) wonder how that painter got hold of his hat to copy. Just now Miss Elsie Barnes has a pretty head on exhibition and Miss Jennie Barnes some fancy articles. Oscar takes pains to put such things in good light and give information about them, and people have fallen in the habit of looking at his window for art exhibits. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 23, 1884 P.3


FRANK BRESSLER Frank Bressler who has had such a serious struggle with typhoid fever in Milwaukee, is convalescing rapidly. He arrived home Friday evening in company with his mother who has been with him during his illness. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


MR. BREUMMER Breummer's new hall, at Mishicott, was dedicated to Terpsichore on Sunday last. There was an unusually large gathering on that occasion, and a general good time was had by all. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 22, 1875


EDWARD BREUNEL, MRS. Rapids news: Mrs. Edward Breunel spent several days with her daughter, Luella, at Janesville. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, March 9, 1916 P.5


JACOB BREY JACOB BREY, WHOSE CARE HAS CAUSED CONTROVERSY FOR YRS., FOUND ILL AND HELPLESS IN HOME Jacob Brey, a city charge, whose care has caused more or less controversy between the city and the town of Rapids and his relatives for several years past, was removed to the hospital Saturday when the aged man was found ill and helpless and without food in his home on South Tenth street. Brey, who is suffering from rheumatism, said that he had been helpless for several days and that for two days he had nothing to eat. Report was made to the Poor Commissioner Walter Joyce and Brey was ordered removed to the hospital. For some time Brey has received $10 per month from the city as a poor charge. He owned a farm at Rapids years ago and later, it was said, was unable to agree with his son while being cared for by Brey, Jr. The town board and the city compelled the son to provide a certain amount for the father's support. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 17, 1916 ********** CITY WILL AGAIN ASK COUNTY BOARD TO JOIN IN MOVE FOR POOR HOUSE Situation Revealed by Brey Case Leads to Move Reviving Plan Many Times Defeated and Poor Committee Will Have Recommendation at Next Meeting on Subject Declaring that the city would be ???????? ??? in event of death of Jacob Brey, a poor charge who was ???? helpless in his home and unattended, Alterman Arthur Schuetze in the council last night revived the plan for a city or city-county poor house and urged that a committee be named to take up the matter with the county board at its session next month. Schuetze's suggestion will be taken up by the Poor committee which will present a recommendation at the next meeting of the council. Citing the Brey case, Ald. Schuetze pointed out the difficulty faced by the city in providing for its poor and said that he believed that some extablishment which would provide proper car in cases similar to that of Mr. Brey was absolutely necessary. Brey, who is 88, has received $10 a month from the city but this is insufficient to provide an attendant to look after him and when he suffered a severe attack of illness several days ago, he was alone and helpless and for two days says he was without food. The man was removed to the hospital temporarily though it was intimated that permanent quarters could not be secured for him there. The county board has on several occasions in the past defeated the city's move to co-operate in establishing a poor house but it is said that the plan may get a hearing at the session next month. An effort will be made at the next meeting to outline some plan and get it before the county board, and if this fails the city may go ahead on its own hook it was intimated. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, April 18, 1916 p.1


CHAS. BRICK Chas. Brick and Moritz Nielsen will start a general store in Nielson's building on Jay stret. The building is now being prepared, and will probably be ready by the middle of November. They are young men of enterprise, and we hope they will make money in their new venture. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 25, 1881 P. 1


E.C. BRICK E.C. Brick, superintendent of schools of Grant county, has returned to his home at Lancaster, Wis., after spending several days here with his daughter. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, June 3, 1916 P.2


MR. BRIER Mr. Brier an old resident of St. Nazians sold his property at auction last Friday. He intends to locate in Oregon. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 10, 1885 P.6


LIZZIE BRIESKE Marriage of Aug. Kallenberg, son of Gotth. Kallenberg, with Miss Lizzie, daughter of Mrs. Carl Brieske, Sun. in the home of the bride’s parents in Town Rhine. June 29, 1893, Der Nord Westen


MR. BRINK About midnight on Friday last our fire department was called into requisition by the burning of the dwelling house, barn, and other outbuildings of Mr. ____ Brink, on the south side, every portion of which was destroyed. Insured for $600. August 17, 1871, Manitowoc Pilot


PETER BROEHL In a letter from Verdun front, Peter Broehl received news of his brother being wounded for three times in the engagement there. The report was very meager and the extent of the injury is not known. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 8, 1916 P.3


FRED BROER Fred Broer, who is attending the Oshkosh Normal school and M. Raick and F. Koch, students at the Lutheran University at Watertown, Wis., are home for the holidays. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Dec. 28, 1886


FRED W. BROER Manitowoc County has sixteen students in the Normal School at Oshkosh, being excelled in number only by Fond du Lac, Sheboygan, Kenosha and Winnebago counties. The names of the students from this county are: Martin McMahon, Osman; Oscar F. Huhn, St. Wendel; Fred W. Broer and Louis A. Kahlenberg, Two Rivers; Andrew Gilbertson, Rube; Henry Wernecke, Chas. Groth, Henry Groth, Newtonburg; J.E. Hewitt, Greenstreet; Wm. M Degenhart, Manitowoc; Lewis A. Schmitz, Herman A. Schmitz, Nordheim; Mary Brenman, Cato, Clara Wigen, Clarks Mills; Michael Mulcahey, Maple Grove; Pauline E. Heins, Kiel. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 6, 1886 P.3


NICK BROST School Hill news: Mr. and Mrs. Nick Brost made a brief visit to relatives in Milwaukee last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 1885 P.3


DAVID BROTHERS Two Rivers news: David Brothers, an enterprising young man of Chicago, who spent his early years in this place, made a short visit here on Monday of last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 4


BROWN, DR. New Dwellings. Among the new dwellings on the North side are those of Mr. M. Fellows - now finished - and of Dr. Brown - in process of completion - are the most imposing in size and neatness of finish, of any buildings of that kind erected here this season. Another nice building has been erected by Mr. Hencher, for a photographic atelier and dwelling, on 8th St., adjoining Mr. Hesse's Marbleyard. We congratulate the owners on their good taste and judgement, and hope that they will induce many others to folow their excellent example. Manitowoc Tribune, Aug. 25, 1874 ******** Dr. Brown experienced quite an accident last evening, by the breaking down of his buggy on South Eighth Street. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 1


E.W. BROWN, MRS. Mrs. E. W. Brown was called to Gibson this week, on account of the illness of her brother, Mr. Honey. Nov. 11, 1884, Lakeshore Times


ED BROWN Two Creeks news: The school at this place, under the management of Mr. Ed. Brown, of Gibson, principal, and Miss Eliza Walsh, of the city of Two Rivers, assistant, is progressing finely. The present enrollment is 60, and the attendance is very regular, although the roads are almost in an impassable condition. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 4


ED. BROWN Branch news: Ed. Brown is in Madison attending the teacher's examination. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 30, 1884 P.2


EDWARD BROWN Gibson news: Edward Brown, who was home to spend the holidays has returned to Chicago to resume his studies at the Rush Medical College. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 26, 1886 P.3 ********** Gibson news: Edward Brown who has been a student at the Rush Medical College is now located with Dr. Currens at Two Rivers.-news from Gibson Lakeshore Times, Feb. 23, 1886


G.L. BROWN Niles news: Mr. G.L. Brown, an old resident of Eaton, has sold his farm of forty acres, located in section thirty, for a consideration of $900. An auction will be held on the premises on the 18th inst., for the disposition of personal property. He will start for Nebraska soon with his family, where he intends to make his future home. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 4


GEORGE BROWN George Brown, son of the late William Brown, is in town. He is now located at Racine. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


GEO. BROWN Clarks Mills news: Mr. Geo. Brown has bought the place known as Brown's Corners owned by Mrs. F. Kuester for $4000. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 9, 1886 P.3


JOHN BROWN W.W. Brown is here from Oakland, Cal., for a visit at the home of his brother, John Brown, South Sixteenth street. Feb. 12, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MARY BROWN Miss Mary Brown, of Gibson, has been spending the past week with her brother Ed and family. Nov. 11, 1884, Lakeshore Times


O.S. BROWN Edwards news (Meeme): O.S. Brown and wife, of Manitowoc, have spent the past week with the family of Mr. Prichard. Mr. B. was for a number of years teacher at this place, and has a host of acquaintances who are always to greet him when they meet him, and wish fine success when he is absent from him. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 4


W.H. BROWN W.H. Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. H.W. Brown, returned home last Saturday from Portland, Oregon, after an absence of over 21 years. He left here for the Black Hills and has followed the mining business during all this time, and has prospected for and managed many mines during his absence. Among them the great Treadwell mine in Alaska. He is now interested in a silver and copper mine and is one-half owner in the Mountain Lyon, near the Republic in Washington. It has been fully proven by Mr. Brown, as manager, and they have incorporated for $1,500,000. This stock is rated now at 80 cents. Mr. Brown will remain a few days to meet his many friends and then return to place machinery in this mine this fall, so that he can be in shape next spring to treat the ore. His many friends here congratulate this Manitowoc boy, who, as but a boy, went out single handed and alone, has steadily climbed up to fortune, gaining, as he has, the respect of the best men on that coast for honor and true manhood. Oct. 19, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


W.W. BROWN W.W. Brown is here from Oakland, Cal., for a visit at the home of his brother, John Brown, South Sixteenth street. Feb. 12, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


DR. W.W. BROWN (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 31 July) Dr. W.W. Brown of Cleveland, Minnesota, visited his parents Mr. and Mrs. P. Brown who reside a few miles from here. Mr. Brown has been ill but we hear he is better. Aug. 2, 1906, Der Nord Westen


WILLIAM H. BRUCE Notice. Whereas, I Olive Bruce widow of the late William H. Bruce of Brown County deceased, have been duly appointed administratix of the estate of the said William H. Bruce deceased as aforesaid, and whereas Mr. Chsancey (sic) Gilbert has formerly been in the employ of the late William H. Bruce, deceased, and as has been represented now, represents himself as being still an agent of the said estate. Now therefore take notice that the said Chauncy Gilbert, is not an agent of said Estate, and has nothing to do with the matters of the Said Estate, or anything pertaining thereto. I therfore caution all persons against trusting him or doing business of any kind with him as such agent. As I shall ratify some of his bargains agreements or contracts whatever and more especially in relation to, and about the business at "Rockport Mills" in the town of Kossuth, in Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. Cooperstown June 22nd 1853. Olive Bruce. Administratrix of the Estate of William H. Bruce, deceased. By Valentine Aldrich, her Agent. N.B. All Business relating to the above estate at the "Rockport Mills" above mentioned will be transacted by Valentine Aldrich, Agent of the Administratrix of the Estate of W.H. Bruce, deceased. Manitowoc County Herald, Saturday, August 6, 1853 P.2


MARION BRUDER MARION BRUDER ONE OF FOUR IN AUTO SMASHUP Has Skull Fracture But Now Is Out of Danger; Three Others Injured Attending physicians at the Milwaukee county hospital today declared the condition of Miss Marion Bruder, Manitowoc girl who is a student nurse at the hospital and who received a fractured skull in an automobile accident near Milwaukee last night, was favorable and that there was no doubt but that she would recover. Miss Bruder was one of four people injured when a vampire driver with glaring headlights forced their machine into a ditch on Highway 55 a mile south of the Milwaukee county line, early last night. Forced Into Ditch. The machine in which Miss Bruder and her companions were riding, was headed south when glaring headlights of an approaching machine forced them into the ditch and the automobile collided with a telephone pole. Passing motorists took the four injured to Milwaukee hospitals. Other persons injured included Walter Dettman, 26, Milwaukee, fractured leg; Frank J. Little, 28, Milwaukee and a woman whose name was not learned at Milwaukee, minor injuries. All principals in the accident will recover, it was said at Milwaukee though first reports received here indicated they were in critical conditions. Miss Bruder was conscious today and in no danger. Miss Bruder is a Manitowoc girl who recently started a course in training at the Milwaukee county institute. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Bruder are at Milwaukee today, called there by the mishap. Manitowoc Herald News, Wednesday, October 03, 1928 Page 2 ******** CONDITION OF MARION BRUDER STILL SERIOUS Manitowoc Girl, Hurt In Auto Crash At Milwaukee, Fails To Show Improvement Miss Marion Bruder, Manitowoc girl who was injured in an automobile accident at the Milwaukee county line on Tuesday night is failing to show the improvement expected, according to information received from Milwaukee today. Her condition, according to physicians at the Milwaukee county hospital where she is a student nurse, remained unchanged. Miss Bruder was declared yesterday to be in no danger, though her skull was believed to be fractured. It was said no question existed but that she would recover in a comparatively short space of time. Today's reports were more disquieting but it is not believed that anything particularly serious will develop. From the meager information possible to be obtained at Milwaukee, it was evident, however, that physicians were worried. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Bruder, were called to Milwaukee Tuesday night. Miss Bruder was formerly employed as a secretary in the offices of the county superintendent of schools here and for the past year has been taking the course in nursing at Milwaukee. Manitowoc Herald News, Thursday, October 04, 1928 Page 2 ********** Mr. and Mrs. John Bruder were at Milwaukee yesterday visiting their daughter, Miss Marion Bruder. Miss Bruder, who was seriously injured in an automobile accident some weeks ago, has so far recovered to be able to attend to part of her duties at a hospital in which she is a student nurse. Manitowoc Herald News, Wednesday, November 21, 1928 P.4


MR. & MRS. N. BRUDER Branch news: Mr. and Mrs. N. Bruder, visited with Mr. Bruder's parents at Francis Creek on Saturday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


E. BRUEMMER, MRS. (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 15 Jan.) Mrs. E. Bruemmer celebrated her 67th birthday yesterday with family and friends. Jan. 17, 1901, Der Nord Westen


FRED. BRUEMMER Grand Ball At Mishicott - The new hall of Mr. Fred. Bruemmer, of Mishicott, will be completed on the 20th of June, at which time a grand opening ball will be given. Good music will be furnished, and a good time guaranteed. A general invitation is extended. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 1, 1875


LOUIS BRUEMMER During the first year Manitowoc, at a distance of thirty miles, was the nearest market, and the roads to that were corduroys through swamp lands. When the village of Kewaunee was settled, the condition of affairs was improved but even then some farmers were obliged to carry to town on their backs the split shingles they had made, and receiving their pay in flour, return home with the sack on their shoulders. In the fall, supplies were laid in for the whole winter, and if ever the flour gave out, hand coffee mills were used to grind whatever wheat they might have. By far the greater part of the Bohemian emigrants belonged to the agricultural and common laboring classes in the old country." Another Kewaunee County informant, writing of the old times, says: The old settlers suffered hardships; having bought lands, and their funds [being] exhausted, they were compelled to carry shingles on their shoulders, made by hand, to Kewaunee or Ahnapee in exchange for the necessaries of life, traveling on foot from twenty to thirty miles. The writer lived in an adjoining town of Mishicott in Manitowoc county, in 1854, and had his feet frozen in making cord wood at thirty-seven and one-half cents per cord, where they charged him board with $2.50 per week. He was then fourteen years old, and was expected to earn the pork and bread for the family; he made shingles while his feet were healing, and after being able to walk, loaded 2000 shingles on a hand sled to Mishicott, three miles distant, to trade for flour and pork; but on trying the merchants, was sorry to find that they would give 'store pay' for shingles, except flour and pork, which must be paid for in cash; but our cash was gone; finally the merchant relented, and furnished me with twenty pounds [of] flour at the rate of $14 per barrel, and the flour was of the same quality as middlings of the present time. Such were the conditions in this county from 1850 to 1857; there was a poor market for everything. * Letter from Louis Bruemmer. MSS. in library of Historical Society of Wisconsin. 1910 Copyright Pages 221-222"Our Slavic Fellow Citizens" By Emily Greene Balch


LUDWIG BRUEMMER (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 28 Aug.) Ludwig Bruemmer is here on a visit. He was born and raised in Mishicott, but has been living in Minnesota for many years…. Aug. 31, 1905, Der Nord Westen ******** (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 06 Aug.) Louis Bruemmer, a resident of northern Minnesota, has been visiting relatives and acquaintances locally. Mr. Bruemmer, who was born and raised in Mishicott, moved to Minnesota several years ago and operates a business there. Aug. 9 1906, Der Nord Westen


ANTON BRUNER (aka Anton Bruno on 1880 census, Franklin twp.) Kellnersville news: Frank Seidl and Anton Bruno both of whom were married here on Monday will leave with their wives for Chippewa Co. in a few days. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4 ******* (Note: A Francis Seidel and an Anton Bruner were both married on Dec. 29, 1884 which was the last Tuesday of the year. Anton married Anna Seidel. On the 1880 census there is a Frank Sidle age 23 and his sister Ann Sidle age 17. These are probably the two Seidel people in the marriages and article. Also an Anton Bruno lived in the dwelling after the Sidle one on the census. I'm listing them under the names in the marriages so they can be found.)


AUGUST BRUNIG Mr. and Mrs. August Brunig spent last Sabbath, with Mrs. Nate, Mrs. Brunigs mother, in Franklin. Nov. 11, 1884, Lakeshore Times


WILLIAM BRUNING Branch news: William Bruning fell from a buggy while coming from Manitowoc one evening last week and cut his head quite seriously. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 14, 1886 P.1


CLARA BRUNNER YOUNG GIRL IS WAYWARD. So Assert Parents of Clara Brunner In Probate Court. Unable to command obedience from her, the parents of Clara Brunner, a youthful Rapids girl, today appealed to Judge Chloupek in Probate court asking that she be committed to the Industrial School. It is claimed that the girl who is 16 years of age, has been unwise in selecting her associates and has formed vicious habits that are causing her parents much worry and anxiety. The girl is now making her home with a brother at Two Rivers. The case is being heard this afternoon. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 10, 1903 P. 1 ******* WOULD NOT MEND HER WAYS. Clara Brunner, Sixteen Year Old Rapids Girl, Taken to Milwaukee. Clara Brunner, the sixteen year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Franz Brunner, of Manitowoc Rapids, whose parents made application in county court about a month ago to have the girl committed to the industrial school for girls because she was incorrigible, and who was allowed to return home on parole, has again gotten into trouble with her parents and will be taken to the Home of the Good Shephard at Milwaukee today by Sheriff Walter Pellett. At the hearing a month ago the parents were asked by the court to give the girl another chance but she has evidently not availed herself of her opportunity to reform and her parents have asked that she be taken to the Milwuakee home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 18, 1903, P.1


MARTIN BRUNNER ST. NAZIANZ BOY INJURED IN FALL FROM HAY LOFT As the result of a fall last Saturday from the hayloft on the Math Schaller? farm where he has been employed, Martin Brunner, the fifteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brunner of this village is laid up with a painfully injured leg. His ankle was sprained and he suffered bruises about other parts of his leg, and although the injuries received are very painful he is to be congratulated at escaping without more serious injuries. He is recuperating at the home of his parents here and will not be able to resume his work for several days at least. Manitowoc Herald News, Wednesday, August 01, 1928 Page 14


HERMAN BRUNS After an absence of 31 yrs., Hermann Bruns of Portland, Oregon, came back to Manitowoc for a visit, the city where he had lived for so many years. Mr. Bruns, who naturally finds a great deal of change here, is staying with his nephew, Mr. F. Schultz. Sep. 22, 1904, Der Nord Westen


MRS. F.A. BRUNS Mrs. F. A. Bruns celebrated her 37th birthday Tues. at the Silver Lake Hotel. July 16, 1896, Der Nord Westen


LOUIS BRUSSEL Louis On Mon. night an old man named Louis Brussel disappeared. He has lived for many years with Mr. C. Pahlcotter in Two Rivers. The man went to bed as usual Mon. night but Tues. morning he was gone and despite a full search has not been found to this point. It is feared that the old man may have drowned but there is no clue that such is the case. Sep. 7, 1899, Der Nord Westen ******** (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 11 Sep.) Old Louis Brussel, who was reported missing in last week’s edition, has been found near Two Rivers. The man is over 82 and had begun acting like a child. He merely had wanted to take a walk into the countryside and had wandered into some farmer’s place. 14 Sep. 14, 1899, Der Nord Westen


NEIL BUCHANAN In Probate. State of Wisconsin Manitowoc County. SS In the matter of the estate of Neil Buchanan deceased. ON reading and filing the petition of Catharine Bachanan of the town of Two Rivers in the county of Manitowoc and State of Wisconsin, representing, among other things, that Neil Buchanan late of the town of Two Rivers Manitowoc county Wisconsin, lately died intestate at said Two Rivers, leaving goods, chatels and estate; within this county and that she ??? petitioner in the widow of said deceased, and praying that a suitable person be appointed administrator of said estate. It is ordered, That said application be heard before me, at my office, in the village of Manitowoc, on the 26th day of December A D 1859 at 10 o'clock AM. And it is further ordered, that notice of said application and hearing be given by publishing a copy of this order for three successive weeks, once in each week in the Manitowoc Herald a newspaper printed in said county prior to said hearing. Charles H. Walker, County Judge. Dated Dec. 1st 1859 Manitowoc Herald, Wednesday, December 7, 1859 P.2


CAPTAIN WILLIAM L. BUCK Captain William L. Buck, of the 13th regular infantry, was here last Friday. He issued the necessary orders and instructions to prepare Co. H. for mustering out. October 19, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. J. BUCKLEY A barn belonging to Mr. J. Buckley was destroyed by fire on Saturday evening last. The cause of the fire was, to the best of our knowledge, the work of an incendiary. There is little reason for doubting this for upon going out to the burning barn, Mr. Buckley beheld a man making his way from it. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4


MR. BUCKLEY Steinthal news: Mr. Buckley who spent the winter at Clark's Mills has returned to his farm. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 9, 1886 P.3


WM. BUCKLEY Steinthal news: John O'Shea and Wm. Buckley left last week for Chicago and will act as traveling agents for a grocry store there. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 15, 1885 P.4 *************** Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Buckley and daughter, Erna, of Askeaton, Wis., visited here with relative last Sunday. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 8, 1916 P.2


JOSEPH BUDNIK Joseph Budnik was arrested yesterday on a warrant sworn out by Stanislaus Damski charging him with assault and battery. He was arraigned in Municipal court and entered a plea of not guilty, and by consent of attorneys in the matter the case was postponed until Monday, April 10. The assault, it is alleged, was made April 3. Apr. 7, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** Joseph Budwick(sic) was assessed a fine of $10 and costs, amounting to $19.95, in municipal court yesterday. He was committed on a charge of assault and battery preferred by Stanislaus Damski. Apr. 13, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPH BUEHLER Joseph Buehler will celebrate his 71st birthday next Sat. Dec. 24, 1896, Der Nord Westen


JOSEPH BUEHLER Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Buehler will entertain a party of friends this evening in honor of their wedding anniversay, this being their crystal wedding. October 25, 1898 Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPH BUEHLER Joseph Buehler celebrated his birthday on South Fourteenth street yesterday. A number friends called to assist him and a most enjoyable time was the result. Jan. 30, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


F.C. BUERSTATTE Mrs. M. Buerstatte of Ashland, Oregon, who is here visiting with her son, F.C. Buerstatte, celebrated her 87th birthday last Thursday. It is remarkable that at her advanced age she has made the long trip from the shores of the Pacific Ocean to the shores of Lake Michigan. Aug. 30, 1906, Der Nord Westen


FRED W. BUERSTATTE Fred W. Buerstatte, son of F.C. Buerstatte here, who just recently graduated from the School of Engineering of the State University, has taken a position in the machine shop of the Northwestern Railroad in Chicago and will reside there. July 4, 1901, Der Nord Westen


JOSEPH BUGLER Joseph Bugler of Two Rivers has bought 300 acres of land in Alberta, Canada, and will be moving there to establish a farm May 7, 1908, Der Nord Westen


HENRY BUHSE We are indebted to Mr. Henry Buhse our efficient County Clerk, for valuable information concerning Company B, of the Ninth Regiment. Mr. Buhse was Orderly Sergeant of that company, and served as such until the close of the war. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 1


MRS. J. BUHSE Mrs. J. Buhse of Two Rivers celebrated her 79th birthday on Mon. with good wishes from her friends and neighbors. Nov. 4, 1897, Der Nord Westen


LOUIS BUHSE Two Rivers news: Louis Buhse, who shipped from here last spring on the Andy Johnson has come back to his former head quarters to spend the winter. Louis does not give a very flattering account as to the treatment which the employes of Uncle Sam receive on the ocean wave, and inclines to the opinion that life on dry land with plenty to eat is preferable to that of a sailor and diet consisting of hard tack and cold water. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 4


ARTHUR BUKOSKY Grimms news: Arthur Bukosky left for Kenosah last Monday where he will be engaged in cheese making. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 3, 1916 P.5


CARL BULL Carl Bull celebrated his 53rd birthday last Sun. among family and friends. Jan. 31, 1895, Der Nord Westen


JOHN BULL The residence being erected by John Bull on south Sixteenth street will be ready for occupancy Dec. 1. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1899 P.2


C.H. BULTHAUPT Carl Kitzerow almost drowned in an incident on the Manitowoc River. The 10 year old son of Hermann Kitzerow was playing with other boys in the vicinity of the coal docks, which have marshy banks because of recent dredging. A piece of the bank gave away throwing the boy into the river. His comrades yelled for help and C.H. Bulthaupt, a guard on the coal ship, jumped into the eddy that had taken the boy. The effort would have been in vain had it not been for the son of Henry Esch, Gottfried by name, who got into a boat and together they pulled the unconscious boy aboard. 21 July 1887, Der Nord Westen


FRED BULTHAUPT Fred. Bulthaupt, the grain-buyer of Truman & Cooper, has accepted a lucrative position in Wausau, whither he left yesterday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 14, 1882 P. 1


HENRY BULTHAUPT Mr. Henry Bulthaupt says, "misery never comes single," they are a pair of twins. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 2, 1882 P. 1


MRS. H.L. BUMP Mrs. H.L. Bump has returned to her home at Dwight, Ill, after a visit at the home of her niece, Mrs. John Schmidtman. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 24, 1916 P.3


JESSE & JOE BUNKER Two Rivers news: Jesse and Joe Bunker will both start for Ashland this morning, expecting to try their fortune further north. The boys expect to engage in the fishing business. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4


MR. & MRS. H. BURGER JR. Mr. and Mrs. H. Burger Jr. left for Milwaukee this morning and will be guests at the wedding of Mrs. Burger's brother, solemnized there tonight. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, Nov. 25, 1899 P.2


HENRY BURGER MAN NEAR DEATH IN AUTO-MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT HENRY BURGER, MOTORCYCLIST, SAVED BY FACT THAT BRANDT’S AUTOMOBILE WAS RUNABOUT AND A LIGHT MACHINE BURGER ON WAY TO COURT FOR SPEEDING Henry Burger, of the Burger Ship Building company, owes his life to the fact that John Brandt, salesman for the Schmidtman Sons company, drives a light runabout instead of a heavy touring car. Brandt’s car passed over Burger’s body in a mishap today but the fact that the car was a light one saved Burger as had the car been a heavy one the young man would probably have been killed. The accident, which sent Burger to a physician with a gash in his leg and his body severely bruised, though his injuries are not serious, happened at Jay and Tenth street this morning when Burger, riding a motorcycle on Tenth and Brandt driving his car on Jay, turning onto Tenth came together when Burger attempted to circle around the automobile which turned onto Tenth from Jay going south. Burger was riding north on Tenth and when the Brandt car rounded the corner, Burger became confused and in attempting to avoid the automobile, ran into its path and there was a crash. Burger with his machine was thrown to the pavement and the automobile passed over his body and the machine. Had the machine been a heavy one Burger would undoubtedly have sustained serious if not fatal injuries. The motorcycle was damaged but the Brandt car was uninjured and Mr. Brandt, aside from a shaking up, escaped unhurt. Drivers of both machines probably became confused which caused the accident although according to reports, Burger was at fault in attempting to change his course which led Brandt to make a shorter turn than he appeared to have intended to do. Burger was assisted by Mr. Brandt and bystanders and was taken to the office by Dr. G.W. Patchen who happened to pass shortly after the accident. Though Burger was not seriously injured he is badly bruised and will be laid up for ten days. Burger it is said, was on his way to the police station in response to a notice that complaint had been made against him for alleged speeding. The complaint will have to wait a few days until Burger is able to be about. April 29, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. H. BURGER MOTHER WHO GOT DIVORCE AND REWEDS GIVES UP HER CHILD Divorced February 7, 1911, and at that time granted custody of her six-year-old son, Mrs. Minnie Oertling appeared in circuit court yesterday and filed a stipulation by which the custody of the child is given to Mrs. H. Burger, a sister of her divorced husband, and Judge Kirwan has entered an order to this effect. Mrs. Oertling, who was divorced from Walter Oertling, has been married again and the father of the boy desired the custody of the child and a stipulation was agreed to. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, November 17, 1913 p.3


HENRY BURGER, MRS. Mrs. Henry Burger departed for Milwaukee today, called there by a message announcing the critical illness of her father, Capt. H. Oertling. She will remain to help care for Capt. Oertling who is 81 years of age. He is known in this city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 13, 1916 P.3


EBENEZER H. BURGERT Referee's Sale. Circuit Court, County of Manitowoc.- Ebenezer H. Burgert and Richard W. Hurlbert ag't Gisborp Gutzloe, Maria Gutzloe, and August Baensch. Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale. IN virture of, and pursuant to a judgement rendered in said Court, in the above entitled action, dated the 31st day of October, 1859, I, Edgar D. Beardsley, Referee appointed in said judgment, shall expose for sale and sell at public auction, at the Court House in the village of Manitowoc, in the county of Manitowoc, on Wednesday, the 7th day of March, 1860, at the hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day, the following described mortgaged premises, or so much thereof as may be necessary to raise the amount of said judgemnt, interest and costs, togeter with the expense of sale. All and singular the following described pieces or parcels of land lying and being situate in the county of Manitowoc and State of Wisconsin, to wit: The north east quarter of the north west quarter of section number ten, (10) town number eighteen, (18) north of range number twenty three, (23) containing forty acres; also the east half of the southwest quarter of section number three (3) town eighteen, (18) north of range number twenty three, (23) containing eighty acres. Dated Manitowoc, November 26, 1859. E.D. Beardsley, Referee. E. Marinar, Pl'ffs Att'y Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, December 2, 1859 P.3


JOS. BURISH CITY HAS NEW SMALLPOX CASE AFTER 10 DAYS Quarantine at Home of Jos. Burish on West Side Smallpox has invaded the city again, after 10 days freedom from the disease quarantine having been established by the health department at the home of Joseph Burish at Eighteenth and Wollmer streets. Mr. Burish is a victim of the disease. Reports from Newton say that several cases have developed there and smallpox is prevalent in the northern section of the county also. Mar. 28, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


EDWARD BURKART Edward Burkart celebrated his 21st birthday with friends last Sunday. Mar. 5, 1891, Der Nord Westen


DR. BURKE (From the correspondent in Centerville, 27 May) Dr. Burke in Cleveland had a birthday last Sun. May 28, 1896, Der Nord Westen ******** (From the correspondent in Centerville, 25 May) Dr. Burke celebrated his 42nd birthday on Mon., the 24th. May 27, 1897, Der Nord Westen


JAMES BURKE Kellnersville news: It is with painful feelings that we give the intelligence of Mr. James Burke's being attacked with the above mentioned fever [typhoid]. Mr. Burke stands among the leading teachers of our county. It is the earnest prayer of all that he will be spared to continue in the usefull and honorable profession which he has chosen. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 15, 1881 P. 4 (Note: This is the second part of the article)


M.J. BURKE M.J. Burke and family of Waukesha, have decided to make Manitowoc their future home. They will occupy the Hoyer house on South Eighth street. June 5, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


R.W. BURKE Clarks Mills news: Mrs. Ohde sold her house and lots to Mr. R.W. Burke for $208.00. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.2


SPENCER E. BURKE Spencer E. Burke, son of Washington resident Madison Burke, will leave next week for the Klondike to see if he can find a sack full of gold. Oct. 31, 1901, Der Nord Westen


THOMAS BURKE Kellnersville news: Thomas Burke who used at one time teach school in this Co. and who also taught in Watertown for two years is studying medicine with Dr. P.H. Lynch of Morrisontown. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 1884 P.3


HENRY BURKHARDT (From the correspondent in Kiel, 05 Jan.) Several birthdays have been celebrated – Henry Burkhardt, his 25th. Jan. 7 1897, Der Nord Westen


JOHN BURKHARDT John Burkhardt, a Manitowoc boy employed in Garton & Griffith's factory cut the forefinger of his left hand nearly off on a circular saw, last Saturday afternoon.-Sheb. News. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


BYRON BURMEISTER Byron Burmeister has ordered his Times to sent to Onekama, Mich. We infer from this that the stroke of good fortune which we had been hoping for Manitowoc which would keep Mr. Burmeister and his estimable wife here, has not materialized. May good fortune attend them wherever they go, is the wish of many friends in this city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


CHARLES BURMEISTER Dr. Schweichler, who left for Berlin in Dec. to study the Koch Method for treating consumption, returned here on Monday. He expressed pleasure with his trip. Mr. Charles Burmeister, who accompanied the Dr. to undertake the new method, also returned. Unfortunately his cure had to be interrupted and he is quite ill. Feb. 19, 1891, Der Nord Westen


CHAS. BURMEISTER, MRS. Mrs. Chas. Burmeister of Frankfort, Mich. is visiting her father, Mr. Peining (sic). Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 14, 1885 P.2


THEODORE BURMEISTER Theodore Burmeister departed for Racine this morning where he will take up a position with the Chicago Patented Tool company. Feb. 19, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


W. BURMEISTER (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o’clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


MRS. WM. BURMEISTER After a separation of forty-five years, H. Hobeck and Mrs. Wm. Burmeister, brother and sister, were reunited here at the home of the later. Mr. Hobeck resides at Portland, Ore., and arrived Sunday for a visit to his relative. It was in 1856 that the two parted and although a correspondence has been kept up they have never met since. The re-union is most happy. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, April 9, 1901, p. 1


WILHELM BURMEISTER, MRS. Mrs. Kettenhofen left Tuesday for St. Helen, Oregon, to visit her sister who has been living there for the past few years. On the same train was Mrs. Wilhelm Burmeister, also going to Oregon, but in her case going to Portland to visit her daughter living there, Mrs. Henry Levenhagen. May 2, 1907, Der Nord Westen


CAPT. WM. BURMEISTER Injuries sustained by Capt. Wm. Burmeister on Wed., 8 days ago in Chicago in an accident which crushed his right foot. He was taken to St. Lucas Hospital where he reports himself to be a model patient. His wife has gone to Chicago to be with him. Sept. 1, 1881, Der Nord Westen


MRS. BURNET Mrs. Murray who has been here for several weeks on account of the serious illness of her mother. Mrs. Burnet, returned to her home at Wausau this morning. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 4


ANNIE BURNET Miss Annie Burnet of Chicago and Mr. C. Morse of Lincoln, Nebraska are visiting at the residence of G.W. Burnett Esq. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 30, 1884 P.4 ******** Miss Annie Burnet is at home from Medical College where she graduated with high honor having been awarded the first prize for the best medical thesis. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 28, 1885 P.3


GILBERT BURNET Mrs. Murray of Wausau is visiting at her father's, Gilbert Burnet Esq. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.3


GILBERT BURNET Mrs. C.E. Morse of Nebraska is visiting at her father's, Gilbert Burnet, Esq. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


GEO. B. BURNETT Geo. B. Burnett has been promoted to the position of assistant cashier at the First National Bank. This is a just recognition of ten years' efficient and diligent service; we tender our sincere congratulations to George. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 15, 1881 P. 1


CARRIE BURNS She was dragged by a runaway mule. Aug. 2, 1860, Manitowoc Herald


JOHN II. BURNS FIRE IN THE WOODS.-Last week a fire raged in the woods about a mile from Two Rivers, and took a circuit of about 160 acres. It destroyed about 200 cords of wood, and 80 cords of bark, all the property of Mr. John II. Burns, of that village. His loss is nearly $400, which we much regret. A man of Mr. B's industry and perseverance, however, will make it all up in a short time. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, Aug. 12, 1859 P.3


JOHN BURNS St. Nazianz news: John Burns of Liberty took a pleasure trip to Chicago recently to view the large workshops and take a drive through the extensive parks. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 15, 1886 P.1


OTTO BURNS Otto Burns, of Portland, Oregon, is visiting relatives in the city. He has been out west where he has grown large and strong. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 13, 1881 P. 1


JOSEPH BURRY Joseph Burry, a member of the City Council for the 7th Ward who came from Poland as a 1-yr. old child, just discovered that he was not a citizen… His father was never naturalized. Mr. Burry is now beginning his own naturalization process. June 15, 1905, Der Nord Westen


BESSIE BURSEK Miss Bessie Bursek, who has been visiting with her sister, Mrs. Thos. McKeough, has departed for her home in Whitelaw, taking with her little John McKeough, to spend his Easter vaction with his grandparents. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, April 20, 1916 P.3


ALLAN BURT Allan Burt came home from Grand Rapids, Mich. last Friday, and Elmer Cole returned from Oconto the same day. Mar. 4, 1884, The Lakeshore Times


GEO. BURT Gibson news: Geo. Burt sold out his personal property at auction having previously sold his farm to Mr. Fortier, and has now gone with his family to his new home in Nebraska. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 5, 1885 P.6


ALICE BURTT MARRIED. In Kearney, Nebraska, Sept. 13, 1885 by Rev. Mr. Lew, Miss Alice Burtt lately of Gibson to Mr. Oliver Holinder of Nebraska. We fear the above notice will start some of our other maidens out west where the young men are all preceding them. Mr. Holinder is said to be an enterprsing farmer of the Corn State. The Times hopes the young people will be happy and prosper. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 17, 1885 P.4


BERTHA BURTT Long article May 12, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CHAS. BURTT Gibson news: On account of ill health Chas. Burtt will retire from work for a while. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 16, 1886 P.3


ETTA BURTT Gibson Gossip news: Miss Etta Burtt is making her parents and friends a visit at present. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 14, 1882 P. 4


GEORGE H. BURTT Mr. Geo. H. Burtt, one of the progressive farmers of Gibson, stopped in to see us. He pledged his faith in the Times to the extent of two dollars. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 1


NELLIE BURTT Summons State of Wisconsin---Circuit Court Manitowoc Wisconsin Ellen Whetston Pltff Sarah Fitzgerald & Nellie Burtt Defts. To the defendant above named You are hereby summoned and requested to answer the complaint in this action which will be filed in the office of the clerk of the Circuit Court, County of Manitowoc, at the City of Manitowoc, in said County, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said complaint on the subscriber at his office in the City of Manitowoc in said County within twenty days after the serving of this complaint on your exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the said complaint within the time aforesaid the plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relieve demanded this complaint. Dated at Manitowoc, Wis, May 6th 1875 L.J. Nash Pltff. Atty. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), May 11, 1875


BUSCH, MRS. Mrs. Busch of St. Louis, along with her son, is visiting her parents Mr. and Mrs. Carl H. Paulus. July 12, 1906, Der Nord Westen


OTTO BUSCH Mr. and Mrs. Otto Busch of Two Creeks left yesterday for Toledo, Ohio, being called there by a telegram announcing the death of Mrs. Busch's father, Mr. N. Bartell, a former resident of Two Rivers. Mar. 22, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. J. BUSHMAN NEW MOVE IN FIGHT FOR BABE IN COURT HERE A motion that all proceedings in the case be abated until such time as Mrs. J. Bushman has freed herself of alleged contempt of court by reason of fleeing with the granddaughter over whose custody the action is instituted, was interposed by Attorney E.L. Kelley in circuit court this afternoon when Judge Kirwan called for review of the recommendation of Court Commissioner H.L. Markham awarding custody of three year old Margaret Bowers to her father, Harvey Bowers of Milwaukee. Pending ruling on the motion of Attorney Kelley the review of the case did not proceed. Arguments were being made this afternoon. The court commissioner awarded the child to the father and Mrs. Bushman, the grandmother, with whom the babe had made its home since the death of the mother, left Manitowoc with the child and has been gone for more than a month. It is claimed that no trace of her whereabouts can be found. Manitowoc Herald News July 1, 1925 p.5


MRS. JAMES BUSHNEL Mrs. James Bushnel and son, have returned from an extended visit to relatives at Davenport, Ia. June 2, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CARL BUSS, SR. Congratulations to Carl Buss, Sr. who celebrated his 50th birthday here last Sunday. Mar. 5, 1891, Der Nord Westen


WM. BUSSE VALDERS The Farmers’ institute held here last Thursday and Friday was very well attended. Quite a number of ladies also attended Miss Maxwell’s cooking school which was held at Jonas’ hall. The following are some of those who received prizes at the institute: Fred Kieselhorst for the heaviest man attending; Mrs. F. Kieselhorst for the heaviest woman; Miss Mabel Hougen for the tallest lady; Henry Harvey for the lightest farmer; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Halvorson for heaviest married couple; Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Knutson for lightest married couple; Christian Reinartson for the best team of drivers; Hy Hougen for the best team of draft horses; for guessing the nearest number of peas in a bottle, Louis Horstman, Jr.; oldest married couple, Mr. and Mrs. John Tuschel; for buying the most merchandise at L. Commings store, John Luebke; for the largest load of people, Wm. Busse; for the best sample of barley raised in 1914; first prize Julius Jacobsen, second Otto I. Berge; tallest man attending the institute was a tie between Alfred Christianson and Thos. O. Thompson; walking furthest to institute also resulted in a tie between Isaac Hanson and Ole Ellestad. Jan. 30, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. RUDOLPH BUSSE Cooperstown news: Miss Schultz of Green Bay spent the past week with her sister, Mrs. Rudolph Busse. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 10, 1916 P.4


CHARLES BUSSELLE WOMAN GIVEN FREEDOM FROM MISSING MATE Mrs. Thelma Busselle, Two Rivers, Tells Court How Husband Lied About Past Life An unusual story was unfolded in circuit court yesterday when Mrs. Thelma Busselle, of Two Rivers, was granted annulment of marriage ties from Charles Busselle and given the privilege of having her maiden name, Thelma Barker, restored. Possibility of prosecution of Busselle, if his whereabouts become known appeared as result of the revelations made in the case. Although the marriage of Busselle and Miss Barker was preceded by an acquaintanceship of three years when it took place at Milwaukee, June 25, 1926 at the First Congregational church there, returning to Two Rivers to reside, Mrs. Busselle learned after the marriage that her husband had figured in two previous ventures in matrimony. Further, it was alleged, the divorce papers which Busselle submitted were found to have been ?doctored? probably in an attempt to quiet his wife?s complaint. Learns of Family. After the engagement of Miss Barker and Busselle had been announced to friends, the bride-to-be learned that Busselle had been married previously and when he was ? with this he readily admitted it but exhibited divorce papers apparently issued at Virginia, Minn. and which revealed that there was one child. Two months later when Busselle suddenly took French leave and deserted his bride, papers in his effects disclosed that there had been not only a wife and one child, but three children, in the former marriage. Communication by Mrs. Busselle with the former wife at Virginia brought a letter giving the information that there was another wife at Vinton, Oklahoma whom it was indicated Busselle had wedded after his marriage to the Minnesota wife. Following up the information Mrs. Busselle learned that Busselle had married in Oklahoma but that his wife there had secured a divorce June 6, 1926, which however, did not become effective until six months after the decree was ordered by the court under the Oklahoma law. She was advised by the Oklahoma woman that she should have no trouble in securing annulment of the Milwaukee marriage and that Busselle ?would not appear to contest it.? Admits He is ?Rotter? About this same time Mrs. Busselle received a letter from her husband at Waldron, Col., in which he confessed that he was a ?rotter? and unworthy. He admitted changing the divorce papers in the Virginia decree and suggested to Mrs. Busselle how to secure a divorce or annulment. After presentation of the evidence Judge Kirwan ordered that the marriage be annulled and that the maiden name of Mrs. Busselle be restored, that of Thelma Barker. Miss Busselle, now Thelma Barker, is employed in this city. Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, February 17, 1928, Page 2


MRS. A.J. PUSTABO (sic-[BUSTABO]) Mrs. A.J. Pustabo has returned to her home at Chicago after spending a few weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kaderabek. She was accompanied by her infant daughter. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.3


MR. & MRS. CHAS. BUTLER Clark's Mills news: There was a surprise party, and it surprised Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Butler. It is a good old sight to see so many smiling faces, old and young mingling together in a jolly joking crowd. Among the many smiling faces might be seen those, of course, grave and sedate, of Walter and Charles Green and wives, of Manitowoc. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 14, 1882 P. 4


K. H. BUTTERFIELD K. H. Butterfield and family have taken up their residence in this city. They formerly resided at Valders. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, March 19, 1901, p. 2


JOHN BUYKOS TWO WANTED BY SHEBOYGAN POLICE ARRESTED IN CITY Oscar Wenndorf, Local Man, Taken to Chair City to Face Charge- Alleged Wife Deserter Held by Police Two ment (sic) wanted by the Sheboygan police on warrants issued by courts in that city, were taken into custody by the local police yesterday and turned over to Chief Dehne, of Sheboygan, who came here last evening and returned with the prisoners. The arrests were made by Officer Charles Dueno upon descriptions furnished by the Sheboygan department. Oscar Wenndorf, a Manitowoc man, is one of the prisoners, Wenndorf being wanted at Sheboygan on a serious charge lodged by a Sheboygan girl with whom he is said to have kept company. Wenndorf's parents are residents of Green Bay, having removed fro mthis (sic) city some time ago, but the young man remained here and was employed at the shipyards. He will be arraigned today. The second man taken into custody was John Buykos, alleged wife deserter who is charged with abandonment. Buykos is said to have been employed in the quarries at Grimms for sometime and came to town yesterday to spend the day. He was recognized and was taken in custody by Officer Dueno. Chief Dehue, of Sheboygan was notified at noon and arrived here at 3:55 and returned with his prioners at 6 last evening. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 21, 1916 P.1


ABE BUZZARD Abe Buzzard's stepfather says Abe has joined the regular army. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 19, 1885 P.1


JUSTICE BYRON A Good Record. We dropped in on Justice Byron the other day to see what the honorable court had done during the year. We found that during the twenty months he has held the office, he passed upon 438 cases, averaging nearly one a day. Of these only six, or little over 1 per cent, have been appealed, and as yet, not a single one has been reversed. This is a record, both pleasing to George's friends as well as beneficial to the people. The capable work of a magistrate of an inferior court adds much to prevent the undue crowding of business in the higher and more expensive courts, thus making a material saving to tax payers. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1