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MR. SABIN We always regret to notice the removal of a good citizen and that we have to do as we announce the departure of Mr. Sabin and family for Willington, Ill. where Mr. Sabin has bought a farm. They are universally respected here and their removal regretted. We bespeak for them the hearty welcome in their new home, to which their good qualities entitle them. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 12, 1886 P.2


FRED SACHSE Fred Sachse and Henry Ewald have purchased the general merchandise business of Henry Meyer on Washington street and will hereafter conduct it. Success in their new enterprise is the hope of all the numerous friends of the young men. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, July 26, 1901, p. 3 ********** F.T. Sachse and H. Ewald will take charge of the H. F. Meyer store on August 1st. The former and his wife are at present in Milwaukee and Chicago buying goods. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, July 30, 1901, p. 1


JOHN SACHSE John Sachse of Centerville, celebrated his 61st last Sun. 07 Mar. 1895, Der Nord Westen


MRS. E. SADUSKY Mrs. E. Sadusky has returned to Milwaukee after spending the past few days in the city with relatives and friends. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 23, 1916 P.3


MR. ST. PETER The schooner Hunting Boy left here last Friday morning for Frankfort, Mich., carrying the nets of Mr. P. Camp and his party and of Mr. St. Peter and Mr. Lafond, who also propose fishing on the east shore during the coming summer. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 1, 1875


SAFFORD BOYS Two Rivers news: A number of our fishermen have got their nets this fall in the vicinity of Clay Banks and have had remarkably fair success, a number of large hauls having been made of late. Felix Greenwood and the Safford boys both came in, despite the rough weather of the past week, with their boats well loaded. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 15, 1881 P. 1


GEORGE SAIER Two Rivers news: George Saier of this city returned home from Milwaukee recently, where he has been employed in a butcher shop during the past year. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 8, 1881 P. 1


CARRIE J. SALAK Mrs. Charles J. Salak, Jr. started an extended European tour this noon. She expects to spend a large portion of her time in Prague, where her father was formerly consul. The Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesdsay, July 17, 1901, p. 2 ******* (NOTE: She is on the 1900 Manitowoc census on Marshall st. with Chas. J. Salak. It appears that her name is Carrie J., age 31, b. June 1868. There are 2 sons, Carl age 4 and Geo. age 2. I believe she left for Europe and never came back because she seems to have disappeared from the record. Charles is in cem. #44, Evergreen)


ANNA SALANSKY Frank Shamrock, of Two Rivers and Miss Anna Salansky, of this city, were married at the St. Mary's Polish Catholic church this morning by Rev. Kryzwonos. The couple will make their home at Two Rivers. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, November 26, 1902 P. 1


EDWARD SAME Mr. and Mrs. Edward Same, of Mishicot, departed for Chicago this morning where they will spend the summer visiting their daughters who reside there. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 19, 1916 P.2


EVEN SAMUELSON Even Samuelson a former resident of Cato, and Lieut. of Capt. Gustaverson's Co. of the 15th Wis., was in the city last week. Mr. Samuelson now resides in Sturgeon Bay. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, August 11, 1885 P.3


SWEN SAMUELSON Door co. news: Swen Samuelson formerly of Liberty, Manitowoc Co. was elected assessor of Sturgeon Bay Town. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 13, 1886 P.2


LOUIS SANDER Louis Sander, who was hurt some time ago while working on the steam shovel at the railroad shops, came out for the first time last Saturday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 1


TIMOTHY SANDS Timothy Sands formerly of Wisconsin died at the residence of his son-in-law, J.D. Croissaut in Washington, D.C. Mr. Croissaut was raised from childhood in Cato in this county and lived for some time in this city. He lost an arm in the war and has for some time held a government position in the department at Washington. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 17, 1885 P.4


MRS. ALBERT SANVILLE ACCIDENT MAY CRIPPLE LOCAL WOMAN FOR LIFE Reports from Sheboygan today are to the effect that Mrs. Albert Sanville of Two Rivers injured Decoration Day there when the car driven by Ephraim Sanville was crashed into at a street intersection there by another machine, may be crippled for life. While all five occupants of the Two Rivers car were injured, Mrs. A. Sanville, her sons, Kenneth and Ephraim Sanville were the more seriously hurt and were removed to the hospital there. "I saw the other car coming," said Mrs. Sanville, "but I was in the middle of the intersection then and I did not think there was any danger. I thought he would stop when he saw I was on the crossing. As I was nearing the south side of the street, there was a crash. I don't know how he could have hit me there. He must have been coming faster than I thought he was when I saw him first." One of those in the Cizowshas car, which crashed into the Two Rivers party was Mrs. Frank Behrens. She said: "We almost reached the intersection when we saw the other car coming. We realized that neither car could stop, and all that was left to do was to turn out, if we could. Mr. Cizowahas did everything he could to avoid the collision but could not avert it." Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, June 01, 1928 Page 11 ********* (NOTE: Albert "Sanvill" age 23 is on the 1920 census with wife Mary age 22; dau. Caroline 3/12 and brother Joseph 12. The Mrs. Sanville in this article is probably Mary.)


EPHRAIM SANVILLE Two Rivers news: Ephraim Sanville came from the fishing grounds near Clay Banks on Friday with a haul of 2,400 lbs of fish most of which were trout. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 4


EPHRAIM SANVILLE Considerable sickness seems to be prevalent at present among the little fellows, and a number of cases have of late resulted fatally. Joe Stebo, of the Tannery, and Anton Cayo and Fred Sanville, of this city each buried a child within the past few days. The aged father of John Nieman of Two Creeks, and who, until quite recently reside in this city was also buried here on Thursday last. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4


EPHRAIM SANVILLE (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 05 Mar.) Ephraim Sanville and family who have lived the past year in Nado, Michigan, have moved to Two Rivers where they will make their home. Sanville is a brother-in-law of innkeeper Gustav Moers here. 08 Mar. 1906, Der Nord Westen


WILLIAM SANVILLE On Tuesday 13-year old William Sanville, a son of Franklin Street resident Wm. Sanville, wanted to show off his diving skills and jumped headfirst into the lake from the port's southern pier. Unfortunately the lake there is not very deep so the boy hit the bottom with such force that it knocked him unconscious. His comrades promptly brought him to land and he was turned over to the doctors, but the outcome is still not known. 13 Aug. 1908, Der Nord Westen


NELLIE GRANT SARTORIS It is rumored that Nellie Grant Sartoris is likely soon to seek a permament separation from her husband. Mr. Sartoris has frequently visited this city and the general impression was that he was simply a logy, heavy boorish saloon bummer unfit to be the husband of any decent American girl. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3


C. SASS C. Sass, the smiling clerk of the North Western House, has grown bold and is visiting in the wicked city of Chicago. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


CHARLES SAUBERT Ernst Koeser and Charles Saubert have something in common in that each had an injury that led to blood poisoning. The former has now returned to work after being ill for 12 months. 11 June 1908, Der Nord Westen


FRIEDRICH SAUBERT Friedrich Saubert, father of Charles Saubert here and a veteran of the Civil War, has returned from a visit of several weeks with his married daughter living in Chicago. 11 June 1908, Der Nord Westen


ALVENA SAUVILLE Miss Alvena Sauville of this city and a Mr. Souzian of Gibson were married at the Catholic Church, at this place on Monday a week ago. The wedding festivities took place in Voshardts Hall in the evening. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 11, 1882 P. 4


CHAS. SAWYER Two Men Drowned - We learn that Chas. Sawyer and a man by the name of Woodruff were last weekend drowned near Wolf River. They left Two Rivers in a sail boat a week ago on Tuesday, and the boat was picked up on the Friday following 3 miles below Wolf River, containing the dead body of Woodruff, a heatrel of flour and some other articles. Sawyer is supposed to have been washed overboard. His body has not yet been found. He was a resident of the Town of Kossuth and leaves a wife and 8 children. Woodruff also leaves a family. 02 Nov. 1854, Green Bay Advocate


CHARLES SAYER, MRS. MAE SAYER Mrs. Charles Sayer and daughter Miss Mae, are at Sheboygan where they will visit relatives for a few days. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 10, 1916 P.3


CHARLES SAYER Charles Sayer returned to Chicago yesterday, where he has business interests, after spending the week-end in the city with his family. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 23, 1916 P.3


FRANK SCHAAB It is reported from Kiel that Frank Schaab, a young man employed at the Kiel Manufacturing Co., has been missing since Wed. evening of last week without a trace. It is said that he was an excellent worker and his friends are troubled because they fear something has happened to him. 07 Mar. 1895, Der Nord Westen


ANTON SCHAD Edwards news: Wm. Wilke, of Eaton, Moritz Rossberg, of Centerville, and Martin Stolzman, of Meeme, will at different times during the next few weeks, sell their personal property at public auction. Anton Schad, the celebrated auctioneer of Schleswig, who last year earned $280 as auctioneer, will sell on all these occasions. In the spring Mr. Wilkes will go to Nebraska, Mr. Stoltzman will follow Mr. Bohne to Iowa, and Mr. Rossberg will cross the sea to again view Germany, the land of his birth. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 21, 1882 P. 10


FRED SCHADEBURG NEAR HAPPY HOME. F. Schadeburg had a Narrow Escape From Death, Monday. That Fred Schadeburg is alive today is due to the fact that his work on earth is not yet completed and a physician was able to restore him to consciousness after a lapse of two hours in dream land. Mr. Schadeburg is an employe at the Esch elevator and including his duties is that of caring for the gasoline tank, seeing that it is refilled and in proper condition for furnishing gas for lighting purposes at the elevator. Monday, as usual, Mr. Schadeburg was refilling the tank, when he was overcome by gas, a fellow workman, who happened to be in the vicinity of the tank hastened to the assistance of the unconscious man and he was removed to another part of the building. A physician was summoned and after two hours succeeded in reviving the man. It was a narrow margin, the physician giving his opinion that in a few seconds more, Mr. Schadeburg would have been beyond the aid of man. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1899 P.1


J.F. SHAEFFER Our enterprising merchant J.F. Shaeffer is making preparations for a grand time at his new hall Thanksgiving eve. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 27, 1885 P.2


JOHN SCHAEFER John Schaefer celebrated his 37th birthday here Friday, and the Music Club of the Lutheran Congregation gave him a serenade in the evening. 13 May 1897, Der Nord Westen


MRS. W. SCHAEFER (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 18 Mar.) Mrs. W. Schaefer celebrated her 32nd birthday Fri. with family and friends. There were at least 50 ladies attending the party. 21 Mar. 1901, Der Nord Westen


WM. SCHAEFER, SR. (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 18 Sep.) Wm. Schaefer, Sr., celebrated his 52nd birthday Sun. in the company of his family. 21 Sep. 1905, Der Nord Westen


ANNA SCHAETTERLE Miss Anna Schaetterle is here from Sheboygan, visiting relatives. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 16, 1904 P.2


MRS. ETTA SCHAFF Mrs. Etta Schaff, accompanied by her cousin Mrs. Haste of Toronto, Canada, left this morning for her home in New York city. Nov. 25, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. F. SCHAFFER Branch news: Mr. F. Schaffer is building quite a large addition to his hall. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 1, 1886 P.1


WM. SCHAFFER Two Rivers news: Mr. Wm. Schaffer starts Tuesday for Port Washington. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 13, 1886 P.2


EDWARD SCHAFFLAND Edward Schaffland and W.E. Seibel and families were participants at a large party at Two Rivers Sunday, a reunion of the Stockmeyer and Zlatnik families at which more than sixty guests attended. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 26, 1903 P. 2


EDWARD SCHAFFLAND Edward Schaffland, who gave up his position as County Clerk on Monday, left Tuesday with his family for Denver, Colorado, where he will be staying for some time. Mr. Schaffland, who filled the position for the past eight years, could have continued for another two years, but his health influenced his move to a mountain climate. 10 Jan. 1907, Der Nord Westen ******** Edward Schaffland, our County Clerk who traveled to the Southwest 2 mos. ago in search of relief for his asthma, recently returned whole and in good health. 16 Mar. 1905, Der Nord Westen


F. SCHAFLAN Rapids news: We are grieved to learn of the death of Mr. F. Schaflan (sic), who in company with Mr. Klingholtz left for Germany two months ago. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 26, 1886 P.3


DR. AND MRS. SCHALLERN Dr. and Mrs. Schallern recently returned to Cooperstown. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 9, 1886 P.3


DR. SCHALLERN Cooperstown news: The many friends of Dr. Schallern and wife sympathize with them in the loss of their mother. Mrs. Easton spent a few months here with her daughter and in that time made a great many warm friends. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 1, 1886 P.1


DR. SCHALLERN Cooperstown news: Dr. Schallern reports a few severe cases of diptheria and scarlet fever. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


MRS. DR. SCHALLERN Cooperstown news: Miss Anna Easton who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Dr. Schallern for the past week returned to Manitowoc on Wednesday last. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 15, 1886 P.1


DR. SCHALLERN Cooperstown news: Dr. Schallern has a number of severe cases of typhoid fever. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 14, 1886 P.1


A.G. SCHAUER Tisch Mills news: A.G. Schauer has registered his farm and the name given to it is "High Bluff Farm, " a very appropriate name. Anton Holly has also named his farm, "Star Holly Dairy Farm." Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, May 20, 1915, Page 4


DR. SCHAUER Dr. Schauer of Cooperstown vaccinated over 1,000 children the last few weeks against smallpox. 29 Mar. 1894, Der Nord Westen


JOSEPH SCHAUER Tish Mills news: Joseph Schauer received his saxaphone last week. Mr. Schauer had been waiting for this instrument for a long time. This will improve the music to quite an extent. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 25, 1916 P.4


MRS. SCHEDA Alvin Gundlach of Chicago who has been here to visit his daughter, Mrs. Scheda, returned to his home today. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, April 4, 1916 p.2


JOHN SCHEER Kewaunee Co. news: John Scheer of Manitowoc will manage the new cheese factory of Peter Challe at Lincoln this season. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 27, 1886 P.4


CHRISTIAN SCHEIBE Edwards news: Christian Scheibe, son of Centerville's prominent brewer, picked up his goods, packed his grip sack, and recently went abroad to seek his fortune in other lands. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 4


JOHN SCHENER Mr. John Schener and his son Joseph took a drive through Kewaunee County last week. The old gentleman went as far as Kewaunee, but Jo. couldn't resist the temptation of driving over to see one of Ahnapee's bright eyed girls and went on further, leaving pater familias to come back alone. Apr. 15, 1884, Lakeshore Times


A.P. SCHENIAN Attorney A.P. Schenian left for Chicago Sunday and from there will go to Madison, Lake Co., Neb., where he is interested as attorney in an important will case that comes up for trial next week. The case was appealed to the Supreme court and sent back for a rehearing. While in Nebraska Mr. Schenian will visit his boyhood home at DeSmet and expects to be absent two weeks or more. Nov. 6, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


STEPHEN SCHENIAN Brockville news: Stephen Schenian is making preparations to put up an addition to his barn and a basement stable underneath. Work will commence on the building in the spring. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, February 24, 1916 P.4


WILHELM SCHERBERGER Wilhelm Scherberger is celebrating his 39th birthday today. 04 July 1895, Der Nord Westen


MRS. HENRY SCHERER Two Rivers news: Mrs. Henry Scherer, of this place, is at present seriously ill. Drs. Luhman and Paine have both attended her during the past week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 8, 1881 P. 1


MRS. J.G. SCHEUER (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 02 May) Mrs. J.G. Scheuer celebrated her 62nd birthday last Sat. in the company of many friends and relatives. 04 May 1905, Der Nord Westen


MRS. JOS. SCHEUER (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 03 Feb.) Mrs. Jos. Scheuer celebrated her 64th birthday last Sunday. 06 Feb. 1896, Der Nord Westen


PETER SCHEUER DAMAGE SUIT OF SCHEUER VS TRACTION COMPANY CALLED IN COURT, MAY BE LAST JURY CASE Trial of the case of Peter Scheuer vs. the Manitowoc & Northern Traction company was called in circuit court this morning and may be the last jury case of the January term. Indications of a bitter fight appeared in the examination of jurors in the case which occupied much time and up to a late hour no jury had been secured in the case. Scheuer is sueing the traction company for damage for the loss of a horse which was killed by an interurban car and for injuries which he claims to have sustained. The accident happened a year ago and the traction company will claim, it is said, that Scheuer was responsible for the accident because in attempting to turn his team he pulled the wrong line and pulled his horse into the car's path. The Guttman vs. Connor case, known as the auto case, was given to the jury at 11 this morning. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, February 25, 1916 P.8


PETER SCHEUER SCHEUER CASE GOES TO JURY LATE TODAY Damaged Suit Against Traction Co. One of Hardest Fought of Term Testimony in the case of Peter Scheuer vs. the Manitowoc & Northern Traction company for damages for personal injuries and loss of a horse was closed in circuit court this morning and the case was argued this afternoon and will go to the jury late today. Scheuer sues for $3,000. The case has occupied three days in hearing and has been one of the most bitterly contested of the term. Nash & Nash appear for the traction company and Martin & Martin of Green Bay for Scheuer. Copies of the Herald containing a write-up of the accident were made exhibit in the case today. ******** SCHEUER GIVEN $1109 BY JURY IN DAMAGE SUIT Motorman of Traction Co. Held Negligent and Responsible for Accident in Which Plaintiff Was Injured A verdict for $1,109.50 damage in favor of Peter Scheuer, town of Manitowoc farmer who was plaintiff agains the Traction company in a $10,000 suit in circuit court, was returned by the jury this afternoon. The jury was out three hours and returned its verdict when court convened at 2 o'clock. The jury holds that the motorman of the car was to blame for the accident because of negligence and high speed of the car and that Scheuer was not negligent and had lost control of his team. The jury fixes the damages as follows: For death of horse $335, for damage to wagon and harness $11, for personal injuries to plaintiff $763.50, total $1,109.50.Nothwithstanding the loss of the case by the Traction company the verdict is considered a victory for the defense in the amount of damages awarded. Following the return of the verdict the jury, the last of the term, was excused from further service. Manitowoc Daily Herald, March 2, 1916 P.8


RAY SCHEUER Arthur Holst, Hugo Holst and Ray Scheuer from Mishicott were in the city as witnesses in the Guttman vs. Conners case, in circuit court. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, February 24, 1916 P.3


MRS. R.N. SCHEUER Mrs. R.N. Scheuer celebrated her 30th birthday on Sun. with friends and relatives. 22 Mar. 1900, Der Nord Westen


JOHN SCHEURELL MEYER SANE, IS FREED, BUT MAY FACE CHARGES Declared sane by physicians who have had him under observation since March 29, Otto Meyer has been given his freedom when he was declared able to care for himself. Meyer was taken into custody by the sheriff's department following an assault upon Reuben Madenwald, superintendent of the county insane asylum. It was necessary to use tear bombs to get him out of the shack he calls a home and in the trouble which followed Meyer was wounded in the leg by a bullet. Relatives appeared in county court and demanded a jury trial for the man but it was agreed that he would remain under observation for a time. Wednesday the physicians in charge of the case found Meyer sane and he was ordered released. Whether any further action is to be taken in the case could not be learned today although there is a possibility that Madenwald may have a warrant issued on an assault complaint or the sheriff take action because of the resistance to officers. Meyer is a large, powerful man and is employed as a mason helper, having worked for John Scheurell during the last year. Meyer attempted to drive Madenwald from the trial(sic) orchard and resisted the sheriff's force when it was called. Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, April 13, 1928 Page 13


VIOLA SCHIMMEL Marriage licenses have been issued by County Clerk Auton to the following: Rolland Meissner and Viola Schimmel, both of the town of Two Rivers. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, February 2, 1916 P.3


JOHN SCHLARB WIFE IN GERMANY, HUSBAND HERE IS GRANTED DIVORCE John Schlarb, Two Rivers, Says Wife Ran Away when He Visited Her- Two Other Decrees Granted His wife in Germany, John Schlarb a Two Rivers man was today granted a divorce by Judge Kirwan in circuit court on grounds of desertion. Schlarb wanted the custody of two children, said to be with his wife, but the court was unable to grant this, though, Judge Kirwan asked Schlarb why he did not go and get them. Schlarb alleged that he married in Austria and later, after an absence, returned to his wife who he found had fled to Germany. He suspected, he intimated, that she was with another man. Mrs. Schlarb's father is said to be chief of police of an Austrian city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 3, 1916


EMIL SCHLEGEL Emil Schlegel is at the hospital as result of injuries sustained when he was kicked by a horse Saturday. The man was kicked in the hip and badly bruised though no bones were broken. He was taken to the hospital in the ambulance. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 8, 1916 P.1


MR. SCHLEISS A few days ago Mr. Schleiss of Tisch Mills sliced off the fingers of one hand and two from the other hand while using a circular saw. 23 May 1889, Der Nord Westen


CHAS. SCHLEY Chas. Schley, formerly an employe at the C. & N.W. freight house, has resigned his position and will go into the draying business. He has purchased the complete outfit which recently belonged to Chas. Krumm. Jan. 23, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FREDRICA SCHLEY In County court. Letters of administration were granted yesterday to Albert Meade in the estate of Fredrica Schley. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 1


E.W. SCHLUETER, PASTOR In the place of Pastor E.W. Schlueter, who has moved to Milwaukee, Pastor F. Huebner has been named minister for the Evangelical Church in Two Rivers. 05 May 1904, Der Nord Westen


C. SCHLUNDT (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 28 Oct.) Mr. C. Schlundt celebrated his 70th birthday last week and many friends paid him a congratulatory visit that evening, and the choral group "Liedertafel" performed. He is still quite healthy. He received many written congratulations from Germany. 31 Oct. 1901, Der Nord Westen ******** (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 26 Oct.) Mr. C. Schlundt celebrated his 72nd birthday on Sat. at a party which lasted until dawn. 29 Oct. 1903, Der Nord Westen


CARL SCHLUNDT Carl Schlundt, who was born and raised in Two Rivers and is now a bookkeeper for an industrial plant in Ohio, is paying a visit to his father here. 18 May 1905, Der Nord Westen


JOHN SCHMALFELD John Schmalfeld celebrated his 33rd on Sun. 01 June 1899, Der Nord Westen


FRED SCHMALFELDT Fred Schmalfeldt, tinner at the plant of the Wm. Rahr Sons' company, is confined to his home suffering with severe burns of his hands caused by a gasoline explosion while he was at work Wednesday. Oct. 22, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


EMIL SCHMEISSER Emil Schmeisser, a resident of Town Meeme, has been missing since 28 Oct. He has a wife and children. 09 Nov. 1905, Der Nord Westen


MR. & MRS. SCHMELZLE Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Fraenzel of Milwaukee who were visiting at the home of Mrs. Fraenzl's parents Mr. and Mrs. Schmelzle, returned home this morning. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, August 4, 1904 P. 2


A.H. SCHMIDT Municipal Judge A.H. Schmidt and Reporter Arnold Raether are at Two Rivers today for the regular municipal court session there. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 24, 1916 P.3


ALBERT SCHMIDT Congratulations to Albert Schmidt who celebrates his 46th birthday today. 31 July 1890, Der Nord Westen ******* Albert Schmidt, the jovial tavern keeper of the "Rathskeller", celebrated his 47th birthday on Fri. among many happy friends. 06 Aug. 1891, Der Nord Westen ******* Albert Schmidt observed his 51st birthday yesterday among friends. 01 Aug. 1895, Der Nord Westen ******* Albert Schmidt, "Master of the Rathskeller" celebrated his 52nd birthday on Friday. 06 Aug. 1896, Der Nord Westen ******* Albert Schmidt observed his 53rd birthday Sat. with his "singing brothers" and other friends. 05 Aug. 1897, Der Nord Westen


ALBERT SCHMIDT In Circuit court Tuesday afternoon Attorney Albert Schmidt presented the names of Victor Pierrelee(?) and Arnold Alexander for admittance to Manitowoc County bar, and the practice was favored. The young men are both graduates of the law school school of the University and have been recently established themselves here. They are destined to attain prominence in their chosen profession. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 1901, p. 2


ANNA SCHMIDT Another marriage of the week is that Tuesday of Miss Anna Schmidt of this city, and W.M. Junk of Athens, Marathon county at which Rev. Father Peil was the officiating clergyman. The groom secured two licenses before the ceremony, the first permit having expired before the young people completed their arrangements. They will reside at Athens were Mr. Junk is in charge of mercantile establishment. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 7, 1902 P.1


AUGUST SCHMIDT August Schmidt celebrated his 63rd birthday on Tues. 24 Jan. 1901, Der Nord Westen


AUGUST SCHMIDT, MRS. Mrs. August Schmidt celebrated her 39th birthday Mon. with friends. 12 Nov. 1896, Der Nord Westen


CARL H. SCHMIDT A New Engine and its reception by the Torrent Company The new Engine, ordered by the Village authorities, for Torrent Engine Company No. 2, was landed on the North Pier on Saturday morning, by the Propeller Mandota. It is a fine looking Machine, with Hose Carriage attached, somewhat similar to the one now in charge of the Badger company, manufactured by the same firm, Button & Co., Watertown, N.Y. In the afternoon the Company turned out in full dress, and with a band of Music, marched to the pier, took formal possession of their Engine, and had a grand parade through the principal streets to their head quarters. They were dressed in blue jackets and caps, trimmed with red, a uniform which every one pronounced becoming appropriate and tasteful. This Company is well officered and the interest shown in it by several of our leading men of property, is an indication of its future usefulness. The names of the officers are as flollows: Michael Kuhl, Foreman; John Horst, 1st asst. Foreman; Aug. Berner 2d Asst. Forman; H. Berner, Hose Captain; J. Leykom, Assit. Captain; Carl H. Schmidt, Secretary; Geo. Dusold, Treasurer Manitowoc Herald, Wednesday, December 7, 1859 P.3


CARL H. SCHMIDT Carl H. Schmidt, of the Nordwesten, was on board the train from the South last Wednesday. The iron horse is about the only horse which Carl will admit as being superior to his own little Mexcian (sic) mustang. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1 ******** The controversy between Carl H. Schmidt and C.E. Estabrook which has been going on for some time is causing considerable discussion among our German friends. Mr. Estabrook is giving the Nord Westen man some sharp cuts and Carl naturally don't like it. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 30, 1884 P.4


CHARLES SCHMIDT BABES CRIES SAVE LIFE Infant Awakens Family of Charles Schmidt When Flames Threaten SMOKE DISTURBED LITTLE ONE Father Apprised of Danger Effects Rescue of Wife and Others- Serious Blaze in Washington Street Store Cries of the infant child, who had been disturbed by the suffocating smoke which had enveloped the room, at an early hour this morning, saved the family of Charles Schmidt from death in the flames. Schmidt and his family occupy rooms over the store on Washington street of which he is proprietor and fire discovered at 3 o'clock this morning threatened the destruction of the entire premises, together with the cremation of the sleeping inmates. A dense volume of smoke pervaded the upstairs rooms and the ten month old babe, aroused from its slumber, apprised the father of the menacing danger and made possible the escape, narrow though it was. Fire, the origin of which is attributed to spontaneous combustion in a bundle of cotton goods on the floor in the rear of the store, had, when discovered upon the warning of the child, gained a start and spread to the counters. The heat was intense when Schmidt succeeded in making his way downstairs and attempted to open the front door of the building. Driven back by the smoke and flames he hastily closed the door an action thoughtful and denoting rare presence of mind and which proved of great value in preventing a more serious conflagration- and turned in alarm from box 43, immediately returning to the burning building to render assistance to his imperiled family. Mrs. Schmidt with the child and domestic Tressie Zipperer had succeeded in leaving the building after a hazardous and trying experience, in which they were nearly suffocated by the smoke, but, Schmidt, believing them still in the rooms, made his way upstairs only to be compelled to return by his ability to make his way to the apartments in which he supposed his wife and child imprisoned. The arrival of the departments and prompt work on the part of the firemen, who effected an entrance to the store through a rear window and extinguished the flames, restored order and brought out the discovery that members of the household were safe. Damage wrought by the flames is confined entirely to the interior of the building and will not exceed $1500 to $2,000. The stock valued at $4,000, suffered almost the whole of this amount. Although small destruction resulted from the fire, the good thoroughly soaked by water and injured by smoke are depreciation in value and Schmidt estimates that $2,000 will not cover the loss. The structure suffered some wreckage, by the breaking of windows and shelving, but $50 will meet the damage. Schmidt carried an insurance of $2600 on the stock and is fully protected. The scene presented by the interior of the store is one of general disorder that makes the damage appear greater than it is. The prompt and efficient services of Chief Dueno and his men, which prevented greater destruction, is to be commended. Immediately upon arrival on the scene the firemen located the blaze and extinguished it under difficult circumstances, the first stream being of necessity directed through a window. Had the department been supplied with chemicals the loss would have been reduced considerable as it would have been unnecessary to use the amount of water so damaging to the stock. The serious disaster threatened was but narrowly averted and Schmidt has reason to congratulate himself upon the fortunate outcome. Coming here four months ago from Oshkosh, where he formerly resided on a farm, Schmidt has been rather unfortunate. He engaged in business conducting a general store, the enterprise being under the name of Froelich & Schmidt. Recently it was announced that Froelich had never been interested financially in the business and as a result trouble has piled upon the shoulders of the former Oshkosh man. Affairs were straightened out, however, and there seemed a season of prosperity in prospect for Schmidt when the present catastrophe overtook him. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, January 16, 1902, Page 1


CHARLES SCHMIDT Tisch Mills news: Charles Schmidt of Fond du Lac is home to spend his Easter vacation with his parents. Mr. Schmidt hold a position as commercial course instructor of the high school. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 22, 1916 P.4


CHAS. H. SCHMIDT A new German paper has been started in this village. Chas. H. Schmidt is the ostensible publisher, and the number on our table is a fair evidence of his skill. It is called the Nord Westen. Sept. 20, 1855 P. 3, Manitowoc Tribune


DOROTHEA SCHMIDT The following estates were admitted to probate during the month of February, 1916: Joseph Drill; Isaac Halverson; Jacob Tossen; Morgan Connell; Mervin Geraldson; Ernst Vogelsang; Joseph Holly; Torger K. Hougen; Sidona Boettger; Mary F. Seidl; Simon Stok; Dorothea Schmidt; Rankchild Anderson; Joseph Thalhammer; Catherine Lenerville. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 4, 1916 P.5


HENRY SCHMIDT MANITOWOC AT MILWAUKEE. SOME OF THE CLIPPERS WHO NOW RESIDE IN CREAM CITY. Roaming around Milwaukee one afternoon of last week, we came across many whose faces where familiar; and thinking their fortunes might be of interest to our readers, we jotted down the names of some: Herman Schmidt is of the firm of Menges & Schmidt, and is making money rapidly in the restaurant business. It is one of the best and most frequented restaurants in the metropolis of our State. Hermann (sic) enjoys the same popularity there that he did here. His residence is on Tirteenth street, where his amiable wife, nee Agnes Riechen, makes home a coveted retreat for rest and comfort. His mother in law, Mrs. Reichen also makes her home with them. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 7, 1882 P.4 (Note: There were many named so the article has been posted with each one named)


HENRY SCHMIDT Our old friend Henry Schmidt celebrated his 61st birthday on Wed. last week. 28 Feb. 1901, Der Nord Westen


HENRY SCHMIDT Henry Schmidt returned from Chicago Sunday, accompanied by his son, Albert, who has been in the hospital there and who is improving as rapidly as could be expected from the operation which he underwent. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, August 15, 1904 P. 2


HENRY SCHMIDT 22,000 VOLTS OF ELECTRICITY IN BODY, HENRY SCHMIDT, LINEMAN PUBLIC SERVICE CO. LIVES Henry Schmidt, a lineman employed by the Wisconsin Public Service company in this city, is alive today through what seems little short of a miracle. Yesterday Schmidt had 22,000 volts of electricity shot through his body and while his condition is serious and may result in permanent injury to the nervous system, Schmidt is expected to survive. He is at the hospital and is reported today as recovering. Schmidt, who resides on North Eighth street over the Chermak meat market, was formerly employed by the city but for some time has been with the Public Service company. He was at work on the lines running into the power house of the Traction company at Little Manitowoc yesterday when he met with the accident that fellow workmen expected had killed him outright. Schmidt was on a pole, his left foot resting on an angle bar and in attempting to reach a wire was struck in the forehead by another high voltage wire. A deep burn was inflicted on the forehead and Schmidt was unconscious when taken from his position. Examination revealed that three toes on the left foot had been turned black and that there was a spot the size of a silver dollar on the heel of the right foot. The burn in the forehead is a serious one but physicians say that Schmidt will probably recover. A few years ago he figured in a mysterious assault case when he was attacked and slugged while passing through the grounds at St. Boniface school. The assailant of Schmidt was never apprehended though Schmidt claimed to have suspicion as to who the party was. Dec. 28, 1918, Manitowoc Herald News


J. SCHMIDT From Mishicott came the news that the family of J. Schmidt, which lives near the tannery, has 6 of its members stricken with diphtheria, one of which is near death. 17 Jan. 1889, Der Nord Westen


JOHANN SCHMIDT, JR. TEN YEAR OLD BOY DETAINED AT ELLIS ISLAND, ADMITTED TO JOIN MOTHER AT TWO RIVERS Johann Schmidt, Jr., ten year old Bavarian boy who was detained at Ellis Island when he arrived on December 19 from Germany in company of his uncle and denied admission by immigration authorities because he is deaf, is enroute to Two Rivers where he will arrive tonight to join his mother, Mrs. Isadore Leicht. A message from Chicago today announced the early arrival of young Schmidt. U.S. Senator Lenroot, who was appealed to in behalf of the boy and interceded with the authorities of the immigration department, wired yesterday that the lad had been admitted and then followed the message from the boy himself at Chicago. Father Killed in War The boy's father was killed in the World War and later Mrs. Schmidt, the widow came to the United States to make her home with a brother at Two Rivers. Her young son was left behind and recently when Johann Schmidt an uncle decided to come to America the boy accompanied him. Upon arrival at Ellis Island however, the lad was refused permission to enter the United States and was about to be sent back to Europe when Senator Lenroot was appealed to. Mother has Remarried Mrs. Schmidt, who made her home with her brother Adam Nebel at Two Rivers, has remarried and is the wife of Isadore Leicht of that city. In the appeal to the immigration department it was pointed out that if the boy was sent back to Europe he would be a waif, having no relatives there. Assurance that his mother and relatives here would care for him led to the suspending of the order against his admission and there will be a happy reunion at Two Rivers tonight between mother and son. Manitowoc Herald News, December 30, 1922 p.1


JOHN SCHMIDT IN COUNTY COURT. A notice was issued by Judge Anderson Final settlement in the matter of the estate of John Schmidt. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Tuesday, January 17, 1899 P. 1


MR. & MRS. JOHN SCHMIDT REJOICE IN LONG WEDDED LIFE Mr. and Mrs. John Schmidt Celebrate Silver Wedding. Rejoicing in the twenty-five years of companionship that has brought happiness, Mr. and Mrs. John Schmidt Sunday evening at their home on South Eleventh street entertained a large party of friends to celebrate the silver wedding anniversary. The occasion was one of great pleasure to all participants and congratulations were freely offered to the couple. Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt are both natives of Manitowoc county and were married in the town of Two Rivers, removing to this city immediately afterwards. Mr. Schmidt is an employe of the A.M. Richter Sons, Vinegar Company. It is the hope of friends that their happiness may continue for many more years. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 28, 1902 P. 1


LIZZIE SCHMIDT School Hill news: Miss Lizzie Schmidt of this place left for Chilton last week to learn the millinery trade. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 28, 1885 P.3


MATHILDA SCHMIDT Mathilda Schmidt, daughter of funeral director Henry Schmidt, has taken a position as a voice teacher in Chicago. 22 Mar. 1906, Der Nord Westen


MICHAEL SCHMIDT Accident at Neshoto- Michael Schmidt, of Neshoto, while engaged in preparing a blast in the Neshoto quarry, last week, was seriously but not permanently injured by a premature discharge of the powder. June 15, 1875, Manitowoc Co. Chronicle


ROSA SCHMIDT Miss Rosa Schmidt has accepted a teaching position in Appleton which she will begin on 07 Jan. She is a daughter of Henry Schmidt here. 20 Dec. 1900, Der Nord Westen


STEPHEN SCHMIDT Stephen Schmidt Pays $18.05 for a Little Sport. Stephen Schmidt, of the town of Newton, will think twice before he gets in a wrangle with a friend, after this. On Sunday evening in company with Adolph Rosinski he attended a dance given in Kuffle's hall at Newton and during the evening they became engaged in a war of words over some trival matter and blows were the result. Rosinski swore out a warrant for the arrest of Schmidt, charging him with assault and battery and he was taken before Police Jusice Craite this morning, found guilty of the charge and paid $5.00 and costs, amounting to $18.05, which he paid. Nov. 16, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HERMANN SCHMIEDECKE Hermann Schmiedecke celebrated his 69th birthday on Mon. 16 Nov. 1899, Der Nord Westen


HERMANN SCHMIEDECKE Hermann Schmiedecke, a well-known resident of our city, is celebrating his 75th birthday with children and family. 16 Nov. 1905, Der Nord Westen


ELMA SCHMIDTMAN Branch news: Elma Schmidtman is recovering from an attack of scarlet fever. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 25, 1884 P.3


THEODORE SCHMIDTMAN, SR. Theodore Schmidtman, Sr., is at Sheboygan to spend a few days with relatives there. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 1, 1916 P.3


A.J. SCHMITZ Two Rivers news: After taking considerable testimony in the horse trading case, which was tried here a week ago, an amicable settlement was effected by the parties interested. A.J. Schmitz appeared for the prosecution, and Frank Imler for the defense. The settlement dispoesd (sic) of the opportunity which might otherwise have presented itself for the two attorneys to measure swords. We have not the slightest doubts, however, that the time will eventually arrive when Frank will have no reason to quail before the great legal giants of the county. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 15, 1881 P. 1 ******** A.J. Schmidtz (sic), is reported down with typhoid fever. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 1


MRS. A.J. SCHMITZ Mrs. A.J. Schmitz is in the city on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Franz. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1899 P.2


ADOLPH SCHMITZ On inquiry Dr. Luhmann informs us that Adolph Schmitz is getting along nicely, and is gaining ground daily. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 1


CARL SCHMITZ Mr. Carl Schmitz, of Newton, one of the oldest settlers in the county, encouraged us by subscribing last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 1


E.S. SCHMITZ E.S. Schmitz did not go to Chicago for his appendix operation. Instead it was performed here in a local hospital by Dr. Kemper of Manitowoc and Dr. Oviat from Oshkosh, and all went well. 04 June 1903, Der Nord Westen


EDWARD SCHMITZ Edward Schmitz, who conducts a cafe at Twenty-first and Washington streets, is making improvements at his place. The windows are being decorated with attractive designs. May 10, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


EDWARD SCHMITZ Edward Schmitz will go to Chicago to undergo an appendix operation in a hospital there. 28 May 1903, Der Nord Westen


FRITZ SCHMITZ After Fritz Schmitz in Newton had celebrated his 80th birthday on Christmas Day, his wife celebrated her 70th birthday on Sat. The couple's children: A.J. Schmitz of Milwaukee; L.A. Schmitz and E.S. Schmitz and their wives from Manitowoc; Mrs. Groelle of Newton; Mrs. J. Kastbaum and her husband from Liberty; and Miss Hulda Schmitz who still lives with her parents - all lent their presence to the party. 10 Jan. 1901, Der Nord Westen


FRITZ SCHMITZ Fritz Schmitz in Newton celebrated his 79th on Christmas Day. 28 Dec. 1899, Der Nord Westen


FRITZ SCHMITZ Fritz Schmitz celebrated his 83rd birthday on Christmas Day and despite his age, still steps out like a Prussian Grenadier Guardsman. 31 Dec. 1903, Der Nord Westen


G.W. SCHMITZ G.W. Schmitz, son of C. Schmitz, Esq., of Newton, came home from the State University on Thursday, to take a needed rest, being threatened with an attack of typhoid fever. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 25, 1881 P. 1


HERMAN A. SCHMITZ Manitowoc County has sixteen students in the Normal School at Oshkosh, being excelled in number only by Fond du Lac, Sheboygan, Kenosha and Winnebago counties. The names of the students from this county are: Martin McMahon, Osman; Oscar F. Huhn, St. Wendel; Fred W. Broer and Louis A. Kahlenberg, Two Rivers; Andrew Gilbertson, Rube; Henry Wernecke, Chas. Groth, Henry Groth, Newtonburg; J.E. Hewitt, Greenstreet; Wm. M Degenhart, Manitowoc; Lewis A. Schmitz, Herman A. Schmitz, Nordheim; Mary Brenman, Cato, Clara Wigen, Clarks Mills; Michael Mulcahey, Maple Grove; Pauline E. Heins, Kiel. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 6, 1886 P.3


L.A. SCHMITZ SHERIFF'S AID IS 36 BUT ONLY 8 BIRTHDAYS Leap Year Coming But Once in Four Years Cuts Down Celebrations Deputy Sheriff Arthur Engelbrecht, though 36 years of age, celebrated his eighth birthday anniversary yesterday, Feb. 29. In 1900, which was not a leap year, though the fourth year, February had but 28 days and Mr. Englebrecht was robbed of a birthday. Judge Hubert Falge, also born on Feb. 29, yesterday observed his nineteenth birthday anniversary. L.A. Schmitz whose lease of life dates from the same anniversary, declined to commit himself as to his age, though he admitted that he had one of his anniversaries yesterday. Mar. 1, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


LEWIS A. SCHMITZ Manitowoc County has sixteen students in the Normal School at Oshkosh, being excelled in number only by Fond du Lac, Sheboygan, Kenosha and Winnebago counties. The names of the students from this county are: Martin McMahon, Osman; Oscar F. Huhn, St. Wendel; Fred W. Broer and Louis A. Kahlenberg, Two Rivers; Andrew Gilbertson, Rube; Henry Wernecke, Chas. Groth, Henry Groth, Newtonburg; J.E. Hewitt, Greenstreet; Wm. M Degenhart, Manitowoc; Lewis A. Schmitz, Herman A. Schmitz, Nordheim; Mary Brenman, Cato, Clara Wigen, Clarks Mills; Michael Mulcahey, Maple Grove; Pauline E. Heins, Kiel. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 6, 1886 P.3


LOUIS SCHMITZ Louis Schmitz celebrated his 33rd birthday Thurs. last week, 05 Aug. 1897, Der Nord Westen


J. SCHMOKLER Two Rivers news: On Tuesday of last week, P. Petruski a farmer who lives a few miles north of here and J. Schmokler a railroad employee at Manitowoc, who were on their way to the latter place created considerable excitement in this city. They stopped at the Washington House and the landlord perceiving that they wanted to make a disturbance, ordered them out. Somewhat enraged, they left and entered a neighboring hostelry and got pretty well under the influence of "fire water." Schmokler began to scuffle about the room with Ed. Stolberg, and finally it grew serious and Stolberg struck him above one of the eyes inflicting quite a gash. Stolberg not wanting to have anything more to do with the fellow, immediately took his leave, Schmokler being armed with a revolver fired two shots at hap hazzard, but it is suspected with the intention of shooting Stolberg. Petruski and Schmokler were arrested and charged $7 and $13 respectively besides enjoying a nights lodging in the "lock up." Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 1885 P.3


JOSEPH SCHNECK Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schneck have returned to Milwaukee after a few days' stay in the city with friends and with Mr. Schneck's parents. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 1, 1916 P.3


MR. SCHNEIDER Branch news: The Branch has enjoyed a boom in the barn-raising business. Messrs. Schneider, Mausnest, Lorenzon, Smotz and Voelker raised large barns on their farms, and Messrs. Squirrel and Eatough raised horse barns, all within two weeks. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 29, 1883 P.4


MISS SCHNEIDER Branch news: Miss Schneider opened school at the Four Corners on Monday Sept. 6th and Miss Mason in the Hussey district. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 14, 1886 P.1


MRS. ANTON SCHNEIDER Mrs. Anton Schneider and family have returned to their home at Fargo, N.D., after an extended visit with relatives in the city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 29, 1916 P.3


EMMA SCHNEIDER Branch News: Miss Emma Schneider has accepted the position of teacher in School Dist. No. 2, Mishicott. Branch school has produced some of the ablest teachers in the county, but there are few who have graduated from this institution with higher honors than Miss Emma. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 31, 1882 P. 4


EMMA SCHNEIDER Miss Emma Schneider who teaches the "young idea how to shoot", at Reedsville came home Election Day. We understand her pupils are preparing to give an entertainment in the near future. Nov. 11, 1884, Lakeshore Times ********** Miss Emma Schneider teacher of the Four Corners school called at the Times office Saturday. She has an enrollment of forty five pupils nearly all of whom attend school regularly. A good endorsement of both teacher and pupils. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3


JOHN SCHNEIDER Cooperstown news: Mr. John Schneider left for Marinette one day last week to bring home his sister Kate, who was taken sick there. She is still very low. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), May 24, 1892


JOSEPH J. SCHNEIDER With $4,700 liabilities and only $800 in assets Joseph J. Schneider, of this city has decided that the game is uneven and has filed a petition in bankruptcy, asking a discharge from his debts. The announcement comes as a surprise and many friends will be pained to learn of Mr. Schneider's misfortune. He was formerly engaged in the clothing business here, but later accepted a positon as traveling salesman for the Phoenix Chair Co., of Sheboygan. Nov. 7, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


LOUISA SCHNEIDER Mrs. W.F. Schneider and son, Walter, of Philadelphia, are here for a visit at the home of Mrs. Louisa Schneider, Marshall street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 27, 1916 P.3


W.W. SCHNEIDER W.W. Schneider in Two Rivers, who has had a clothing store there for a number of years, has sold the store to his brother and with his family will leave for Calif. soon for the benefit of Mrs. Schneider's health. She is a daughter of Mr. A. Piening here. 17 Oct. 1901, Der Nord Westen


MR. SCHNELL NOTE: Death notice. Steinthal news: Mr. Schnell a resident of Eaton, who was more than an octogenarian died last Wednesday. His funeral took place on Tuesday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 27, 1885 P.3


FRED SCHNELL Well-known farmer Fred Schnell in Town Liberty recently was working on his farm attempting to blow up a boulder when the dynamite load went off too soon and badly injured his left hand. He is in Holy Family Hospital. 25 June 1903, Der Nord Westen


HENRY SCHNELL Steinthal news: Henry Schnell has built a new addition to his shoe store. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 27, 1885 P.3


JOHN SCHNELL Steinthal news: John Schnell, of Liberty who sold his farm last Spring to Peter McNulty, moved to St. Nazians (sic) on Friday last and will make that place his future home. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 13, 1885 P.2


LOUIS SCHNELL A tragic accident occurred Saturday in Town Liberty. As farmer Louis Schnell was traveling in a buggy with 2 acquaintances, a wheel suddenly hit a large hole in the highway and the jolt threw Schnell out onto the ground on his head and broke his neck. Mr. Schnell is 45 years old and a prominent farmer in that town. 21 June 1906, Der Nord Westen ******** Sometime ago we reported that farmer Louis P. Schnell of Liberty had broken his neck in a fall from his wagon. It was believed that with a broken neck death would follow, and even Dr. Patchen, who cared for the unlucky victim, had little hope of bringing his patient through it, but it appears that Schnell is an exception to the rule in that he is still living and there is every indication that he will cling to life. He is lame on one side and will not be completely whole, but it is believed that the remaining disability will not have a great effect. 19 July 1906, Der Nord Westen


EMMA SCHOCH Miss Emma Schoch gave a party in honor of her nineteenth birthday at her home on South Eleventh street yesterday afternoon. About a dozen lady friends were present and the time was pleasantly passed with music. Supper was served and the hostess was the recipient of many beautiful gifts as souvenirs of the occasion. Those present were Misses Rosa Handl, Clara Mueller, Pauline Mueller, Sophia Eberhard, Louise Haupt, Lena Gelbke, Rose Kappes, Ida Schoch, Lizzie Carstens, Anna Oberland and Mrs. A. Worfel. Mar. 8, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. SCHOTT Mrs. Ingman of Marshfield is the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Schott of this place. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4


TILDE SCHOTT Steinthal news: Tilde Schott came home from Milwaukee last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 19, 1886 P.3 *************** Steinthal news: Tilde Schott returned to Milwaukee last Tuesday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2


STEPHEN SCHPENSKA The case of the state vs. Stephen Schpenska, called in Municipal court yesterday on a charge of resisting an officer, was postponed until Nov. 13. Nov. 9, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPH SCHRAKEL UNLOADED GUN SHOOTS HOLE IN BOY'S HAND Joseph Schrakel, a Two Rivers youth, didn't know it was loaded and as result is nursing a serious wound in his hand, made by a bullet when a revolver which he was cleaning was discharged. The bullet made a clean hole through the center of the left hand and the wound is very painful. Physicians who attended the youth said that Sharkel(sic) would be forced to lay-off from work for several weeks but that aside from a scar there would probably be no permanent injury to the hand. Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, April 29, 1921 p.1


J.P. SCHREIHART J.P. Schreihart is at Milwaukee to visit his son, Edward, who has recently finished a four-years course in engineering under E.P. Allison. June 29, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN SCHREIHART A fine team belonging to John Schreihart our city brewer accidentally got into the river while hauling ice on Saturday last and were only gotten out with the great difficulty. One of the animals was so chilled by the exposure that it died next day. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4


JOHN SCHREIHART John Schreihart, well-known brewer, celebrated his 61st birthday on Sat. with many guests. The singing club "Harmonia", of which he is a member, gave him a serenade in the evening. 02 July 1903, Der Nord Westen


J.P. SCHREIHART, MRS. (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 14 Aug.) Mrs. J.P. Schreihart of Manitowoc and Mrs. Strack of Milwaukee, along with their children, visited their sister, Mrs. Proell here. Der Nord Westen, 16 Aug. 1906


(NO NAME) SCHROEDER Three new diphtheria cases were reported from our city's West Side on Friday -in the families of 21st Street resident Robert Murphy, 19th Street resident D. Miller, and in yet another family. Also, a fourth child in the Jagodinski family is severely stricken with the disease. The disease also exists in the A. Tatek and Ira Smith families on Chicago Street, and in the Schroeder family on the North Side. So far Health Officer Dr. Meany does not fear an epidemic. 22 Oct. 1908, Der Nord Westen


ANNA SCHROEDER TWO RIVERS GIRL TAKES VEIL AT FONDY Miss Anna Schroeder to Be Known as Sister Mary Angelus Miss Anna Schroeder of Two Rivers was one of 48 who received the veil at St. Agnes convent at Fond du Lac Sunday. The Right Rev. P.J. Lochman, administrator of the diocese of Green Bay was celebrant at the mass and the Rev. Geisler of Two Rivers delivered the sermon. Thirty three young ladies including Miss Schroeder, received the white veil and others the first vows. Miss Schroeder will be known as Sister Mary Angelus. Aug. 17, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CARL SCHROEDER The entire stock of furniture of Carl Schroeder, who hung himself several weeks since, has been sold. It was appraised at a little over $600 and brought over $800 on the sale. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 2, 1882 P. 1


CHARLES SCHROEDER Alderman Joseph Revolinski is the latest member of the city council to meet with misfortune. While at work at the Reiss docks Ald. Revolinski had a long wooden sliver driven into his leg and physicians say that he will be laid up for ten days or two weeks, though the injury is not serious. Alderman Charles Schroeder has been confined to his home for several weeks by rheumiatism. Two members of the council have passed away the past six weeks. Feb. 23, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CHARLES SCHROEDER Charles Schroeder, a Rapids farmer, lived with his wife only eight months after marriage in 1914 and sued for divorce on grounds of cruel treatment. Schroeder had other grounds. Mrs. Schroeder had previously been married and divorced, it is said. The marriage was the outgrowth of the offices of a friend of Schroeder who introduced the couple for matrimony. The real issue in the case was on division of property and attorneys will arrange and submit a settlement agreement. Court is nearing its close and it is expected that the calendar will be ended tomorrow or Monday. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 3, 1916 P.1 ************* Silver Lake news: Chas. Schroeder, who purchased a new Dodge car, took a trip to Pigeon Lake last Sunday afternoon. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 8, 1916 P.2


ELMER SCHROEDER Elmer Schroeder will attend the Methodist College at Boreah, Ohio this year. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, September 3, 1903 P. 1


FRANCES SCHROEDER Shortly after midnight on Sunday, 21 July, the passenger liner S.S. Columbia was struck by another ship in the fog several miles off Shelton Cove, California, and sank with considerable loss of life. It was on its way from San Francisco to Portland. Three public school teachers from Manitowoc County were aboard -Miss Hettie Goedjen, daughter of Henry Goedjen, and Miss Julia Matek, daughter of Mrs. K. Matek, both of Manitowoc, and Miss Frances Schroeder, daughter of Peter Joseph Schroeder of Two Rivers. They had gone to Los Angeles on 01 July to attend a national teacher's convention and had joined many others in the postconvention cruise. This and subsequent editions of Der Nord Westen carry news that Misses Goedjen and Matek had been saved, but that Miss Schroeder was missing and that her brother Peter had departed for San Francisco to investigate. (She was never found.) 25 July 1907, Der Nord Westen


IDA SCHROEDER Also on June 2, at the house of the bride. Mr. Frank Strauss, of Howard's Grove to Miss Ida Schroeder of Silver Creek. The groom being the newphew of Mr. Knorr of this place. May joy be theirs through life. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 9, 1885 P.3 (NOTE: Howards Grove is in Sheboygan county)


IDA SCHROEDER Mrs. Ida Schroeder, who had accompanied her husband's casket here from Seattle, as we reported last week, left Mon. to return West. 23 May 1901, Der Nord Westen


J.C. SCHROEDER (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 22 Nov.) Mr. J. Assmann, who has bought the farm of J.C. Schroeder, will move onto it soon. Mr. Schroeder and his family will move to Iowa where he will buy a farm. 24 Nov. 1904, Der Nord Westen


LIZZIE SCHROEDER The other night Lizzie Schroeder came near severing all the tendons and vessels in the wrist, from striking a broken lamp that had been placed on the window sill below an open window. Dr. Paine was called and applied the necessary remedy. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 18, 1881 P. 1


NORMAN SCHROEDER TWO RIVERS MAN FIRST IN SPEEDERS LIST Norman Schroeder Find $10 for Speeding in that City Norman Schroeder, a Two Rivers man, is the first member on the speeders' list, the official record of municipal court of the season, Schroeder being fined $10 and costs in court this morning on charges prefered by Officer Schluck of Two Rivers. It was charged that Schroeder had speeded on Jefferson street, Two Rivers, yesterday and pleaded guilty to the charge. The prosecution was under the state law. When the new county automobile ordinance passed by the county board yesterday is published and operative, the fines collected from speeders and other violators, will go into the county treasury. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 17, 1916 P.1


AUGUST SCHUBERT Mr. and Mrs. August Schubert have arrived in the city from Grottna, Germany and will make their home here, where Mr. Schubert will be employed in the brickyards of Frank Woerful. Mr. and Mrs. Schubert sailed on the steamer Hanover, March 8. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, March 31, 1902, Page 1


AUGUST SCHUETTE Invitations have been issued by Mr. and Mrs. August Schuette for a reception in honor of the Silver Wedding anniversary of their marriage to be celebrated tomorrow evening. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 26, 1903 P. 2


JOHN SCHUETTE It has been found necessary to shoot the horse belonging to John Schuette, which was hurt last week. Its leg was found to be broken, and death was the only cure. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 18, 1881 P. 1


LIZZIE SCHUETTE John Schuette is here from St. Paul, to attend the wedding of his sister Lizzie, this week. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, December 14, 1903 P. 1


WALDEMAR SCHUETTE EXTRA! WALKS OUT OF WINDOW, YOUTH BADLY INJURED Waldemar Schuette, South Eighteenth street young man is a patient in the Holy Family hospital suffering from serious injuries, the result of one of the most peculiar accidents recorded here in some time. In some manner late last night, Schuette walked out of a second story window of the residence and fell to the ground. The attending physician diagnosed his case as abrasions about the face and a ruptured bladder. An operation was resorted to early this morning in an effort to alleviate the pain and to relief the condition. As near as can be learned, the accident occurred either late last night or at about 1 am today. Manitowoc Herald News, Friday, July 27, 1928 Page 1 ****** (Note: May be Waldemar Schuett in Evergreen #44)


AUG. SCHUETTE Mr. Aug. Schuette has again gone south for his health but this time only as far as Jay St. where he has taken up a temporary abode for the winter so as to be nearer his place of business. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 24, 1885 P.3


AUGUST SCHUETTE Mr. August Schuette who lives on the Town line had a narrow escape from serious injury this morning. He was driving home with a load of shingles and sitting on the load when a part of it slipped off throwing him forward between his horses. He struck with his feet on the ground in front of the whiffle-tree and inside of the traces in which position he was dragged about a block by his frightened horses, before he succeeded in stopping them. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1885 p.4


AUGUST SCHUETTE August Schuette celebrated his 66th birthday last Sat. among friends in the home of his son-in-law, W. Fehring. 17 Jan. 1895, Der Nord Westen


AUGUST SCHUETTE August Schuette is putting water works and sewers into his house on 9th street. Oct. 21, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


AUGUST SCHUETTE Congratulations to August Schuette who is celebrating his 69th birthday today. 12 Jan. 1899, Der Nord Westen


AUGUST F. SCHUETTE August F. Schuette celebrated his 66th birthday Sun. with friends. 16 Jan. 1896, Der Nord Westen


CHAS. SCHUETTE (DAUGHTER) On Fri. a little daughter of Louis Corners resident Chas. Schuette was trying to cut a piece of string when the knife slipped and went into her eye destroying its sight. The doctors hope that by stabilizing the other eye its sight will be saved. 16 Apr. 1903, Der Nord Westen


FRITZ SCHUETTE Fritz Schuette celebrated his 55th birthday with many friends on Mon. 07 Dec. 1899, Der Nord Westen


FRED SCHUETTE Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schuette and daughter, Miss Florence, departed for Milwaukee this morning to attend the celebration there of the birthday of Mrs. H.L. Banzhoff, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Schuette. Feb. 15, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


GEORGE SCHUETTE Among the patents issued July 1, is one to George Schuette, Manitowoc, Wis. The invention relates to cheese presses; the cylinder press being supplied with raised lines to enable it to impress a series of indentations or lines on the cheese during the process of pressing. The division lines serve as guides in cutting the cheese and for other purposes. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, August 4, 1885 P.1


GUSTAVE SCHUETTE TOO HOT TO WORK IN THE FIELDS AND ASYLUM INMATE TAKES FRENCH LEAVE-IS RETURNED Gustave Schuette's Mind Unbalanced By Over Study in Perfecting New Type of Gasoline Engine to Cheapen Product It Is Said Taken into custody at Hilbert, Gustave Schuette, a patient at the Manitowoc county asylum, who is said to have escaped several times lately, has been returned to the asylum. Supt. Otto Drews having brought Schuette back from Hilbert. Schuette had been employed in the field making hay and said he decided it was too hot to work and quietly made his getaway. Upon arrival at Hilbert he made inquiry for the county farm and was late taken into custody and said that he had escaped from the Manitowoc asylum. Schuette is harmless. Schuette, who is 40 years old, has been at the asylum for years, is believed to have become insane from over study years ago when as a young man he invented a gasoline engine of galvanized tin in the hope of putting a cheaper engine on the market. When the engine was completed and tested it is said to have proved a success but lack of capital made it impossible to promote it and Schuette brooded over the matter until his mind became unbalanced. July 29, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


H.S. SCHUETTE Mr. H.S. Schuette of this city has received a patent upon a street lamp. "Let us have light." Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 3, 1885 P.6


JOHN SCHUETTE The Hon. John Schuette of this city has been chosen as one of the deep water way commissioners, and a better selection could not have been made. Mr. Schuette is greatly interested in deep water ways and he is also interested in having the courses lead to Manitowoc. Nov. 10, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN SCHUETTE, JR. John Schuette, Jr., who has been attending Culver Military Academy, is home to spend the summer vacation with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schuette. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, June 13, 1916 P.3


ROSE SCHUETTE Miss Rose Schuette came home from Downer college at Milwaukee, to visit her parents. Nov. 25, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


J.W. SCHUETTLER, MRS. Mrs. J.W. Schuettler of St. Nazianz is leaving today for the Territory of Washington where her husband has found work. 24 Oct. 1889, Der Nord Westen


CHAS. SCHUETZE Chas. Schuetze and Richard Nyhagen, employes of the Manitowoc Seating company, have reason to rejoice. Both young men have received notice of promotion and an increase in salary. Since the concern entered the trust it has been generally known that some changes in the working forces here would be made. The blow has fallen and Messrs Schuetze and Nyhagen will hereafter be employed in the office at Chicago. Both young men are worthy and have many friends who will extend congratulations upon their success. They will leave Monday morning for the windy city and the HERALD trust that prosperity may attend them in their new home. Apr. 8, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MARGARET SCHULTE Miss Margaret Schulte has returned to her home at Cleveland after spending yesterday in the city attending the K.C. dance at Two Rivers l ast night. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 24, 1916 P.2


ADOLPH E. SCHULTZ THROWN FROM CARRIAGE AND IS INJURED A.E. Schulze Suffers Injury to Knee and Will Be Laid Up 10 Days Adolph E. Schulze, of the Schulze Insurance Agency, is confined to his home on Western avenue as result of injuries he sufferd Saturday evening in falling from a carriage while on his way home. Mr. Schulze suffered an injury to his knee cap and physicians said that it would be a week or ten days before he would be able to get about. Mr. Schulze had been picked up by a friend while on his way home. In making a turn the horse was pulled short and the carriage threatened to overturn and Schulze, who was taken unaware, was thrown from his seat striking his knee cap in the fall. The injury is not serious. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 24, 1916 P.1


CHARLES SCHULTZ (correspondent, Two Rivers, 24 Jan) Charles Schultz, a resident of the south side, has had the misfortune of losing the sight in one eye and it is feared he may lose sight in the other. 27 Jan 1898, Der Nord Westen


DANIAL SCHULTZ Danial (sic) Schultz, who resides on South Eleventh street, has purchased a farm near Sheboygan and will remove there with his family about April 1. Mar. 23, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


EUGENE SCHULTZ LITTLE ONE HAS NARROW ESCAPE Infant Child of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Schultz Prompt action on the part of the parents in summoning medial aid, Thursday saved the life of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schultz, South Twentieth Street, who had been poisoned in drinking a quantity of arsenic solution. While playing about the house the child became possessed of a plate of poisoned fly paper, over which water had been poured and drank a considerable quantity of the liquid. The mother noting the act, immediately dispatched a messenger for a doctor, who upon arrival succeeded in relieving the child and saving the life, which was in great danger, although not fully recovered the baby is now out of danger. (NOTE: This child would be Eugene from the 1900 Manitowoc twp. census Ward 7 p. 6.) May 31, 1901, Manitowoc Daily Herald


F. SCHULTZ JR. F. Schultz Jr. started on a business trip west on Thursday. He is greatly improving his father's tannery. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 1


F.J. SCHULTZ F.J. Schultz accompanied his wife to Milwaukee last evening. Mrs. Schultz will consult with an eye specialist. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, August 15, 1904 P. 2


FERDINAND SCHULTZ A STABBING AFFRAY. There was a serious stabbing affray in the Third Ward on Friday evening last. An altercation occurred between a tailor named Kazda who it is claimed was intoxicated and Ferdinand Schultz, the men clinched and during the scuffle Kazda drew a knife and stabbed Schultz in the head and face inflicting serious injuries. Kazda was arrested and taken before Justice Bach to answer the charge of being drunk and disorderly and later was arrested and brought before Justice O'Hara on the more serious charge of assault with intent to do great bodily harm. Both cases were adjourned, the accused giving bail. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 14, 1886 P.1


FERDINAND SCHULTZ Ferdinand Schultz celebrated his 50th birthday. 08 July 1897, Der Nord Westen


FERDINAND SCHULTZ Ferdinand Schultz, former proprietor of "Meeme House" here, left with his family last Mon. for Milwaukee where he will operate a saloon. 06 June 1889, Der Nord Westen


FRANK SCHULTZ Frank Schultz paid a fine of $1 and costs in Municipal court for being disorderly on the streets. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 19, 1903 P. 2


FRED SCHULTZ Two Rivers news: Well diggers on the farm of Fred Schultz, of the Town of Two Rivers, struck on a log at the depth of eighty five feet from the surface, one day recently. The log, which is supposed to be a poplar one, is so well preserved that the work of boring had to be discontinued at that place, and a new start has been made at a different spot. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 25, 1881 P. 4


FRED SCHULTZ Alfred Becker and Fred Schultz have received their commissions from Gov. Rusk as First and Second lieutenants in Capt. Becker's company. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 23, 1884 P.3


FRED SCHULTZ City Assessor Fred Schultz celebrated his birthday last Tuesday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 12, 1885 P.4


HENRY SCHULTZ DEATH FOLLOWS PLAY Sad Accident in Which Two Little Girls Lose Their Lives at Two Rivers DEATH STRUGGLE IN WATER Henry Schultz, Sixteen Year Old Lad, Makes Heroic Effort to Rescue the Victims-Both Children Non-Residents A sad fatality in which two lives were lost by drowning is reported from Two Rivers and details of the shocking accident received at this office reveal the heroism of a sixteen year old lad who made strenuous efforts to save the victims and nearly met the same sad fate as a result. The accident happened shortly after 4 o'clock Friday afternoon, Mabel Garvis, an eleven year old girl of Milwaukee and Beatrice Pearson; aged ten years of St. Paul, being the victims. The children were at Two Rivers to spend their vacation with their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Christian Miller. They had visited the beach and were playing near about when they ventured out on the boom and losing their balance, both girls were precipitated into the water. The current at the point where they fell into the river was very swift and they were carried down. Henry Schultz who happened to be in the vicinity, saw the terrible peril in which they were placed and responding to their cries for help, plunged into the water to the rescue. He succeeded in reaching them and would undoubtedly have been able to save their lives but for the girls themselves. Highly excited and crazed with terror, both grasped the boy tightly about the arms and neck, weighing him down so that he was unable to swim or make progress and all three were dragged down. It was impossible for Schultz to make the girls understand that they must not hold him if they would be saved and realizing the danger to all he freed his arms but when he again attempted to reach the others, they had been carried beyond his reach to their fate. Making for the shore he succeeded in reaching it in safety completely exhausted. He was assisted by willing hands and recovered shortly. The life saving crew at once launched a boat and pulled to the accident recovering the two bodies but all efforts to resuscitate them proved futile, and they were carried to the home which they had left but a short time before in life. The bodies will be sent to their respective homes for burial. The news of the accident spread quickly and a pall was cast over the city. The heroic effort of young Schultz in behalf of the victims is highly commended and the boy is certainly deserving of all praise for his manly act. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, July 21, 1900, Page 1


J.E. SCHULTZ Reedsville news: J.E. Schultz has his large hall nearly completed and intends to have a grand opening the last of this month.


JOHAN SCHULTZ Sheriff's Sale. By virtue of an execution issued out of and under the seal of the Circuit Court for Manitowoc County, to me directed against the goods, chattels and real estate of Johan Schultz, I have seized and taken the following described real estate the property of said defendent to wit: The south east half of the south west quarter, of section one, (1) town number eighteen, (18) Range twenty-two, (22) which I shall expose for sale at public auction, as by law directed, at the store of K.K. Jones in the village of Manitowoc, in the county of Manitowoc and State of Wisconsin, on Wednesday the 26th day of October, A.D., 1853, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon of that day, to satisfy said execution and costs. D.H. Van Valkenburgh, Sheriff. Dated, Manitwooc, Sept. 7th 1853. Manitowoc County Herald, Saturday, September 17, 1853 P.3


MINNIE SCHULTZ Marriage licenses have been issued by County Clerk Auton to the following: Henry Bratz of Rockland and Minnie Schultz of Cooperstown. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, February 2, 1916 P.3


MISS SCHULTZ Cooperstown news: Miss Schultz of Green Bay spent the past week with her sister, Mrs. Rudolph Busse. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 10, 1916 P.4


MRS SCHULTZ Brother Drops in After Absence of Over Thirty Years Mrs. Schultz, residing on School street, was pleasantly surprised on Thursday evening by a visit from her brother, Fred Mills, whom she had not seen in 31 years and whom she had given up for dead. He is now 54 years of age and is employed at Detroit and gave no notice of his coming. The last time she saw him was in northern Wisconsin, when he left at the age of 23 years. Efforts to locate him failed and it was thought he was dead. Mr. Mills intends to remain in Two Rivers for a visit. Manitowoc Herald News | Saturday, June 30, 1928 | Page 12


ADOLPH SCHULZE Last Fri. evening, 04 Nov., the fiftieth birthday of Mr. Adolph Schulze was celebrated. He is the innkeeper at the Adler Saloon on Washington St. The article details the singing and festivities. 15 Nov. 1883, Der Nord Westen


FRANZ SCHURRER (DAUGHTER) On Tuesday last week a little daughter of Franz Schurrer in Centerville fell into an open cistern. Fortunately, the mother was nearby and though the child was totally submerged, was able to grab a corner of her clothing and pulled her out, saving her from a certain drowning. 01 Nov. 1906, Der Nord Westen


HUGH SCHURRER (From the correspondent in Centerville, 27 May) Hugh Schurrer celebrated his 29th birthday on Sunday. 28 May 1896, Der Nord Westen


HARMON SCHUSSER Fatal Accident - A boy named Harmon Schusser, aged about 12 years, while engaged at running a lath machine in a saw mill at Neshoto last Saturday afternoon was stuck in the abdomen by a piece of lath producing internal injuries from the lungs(?) of which he died on the day following. July 20, 1871, Manitowoc Pilot


ROBT SCHUSTER Two Rivers news: Robt Schuster, who has been showing symptoms of insanity for some time past was taken to the Oshkosh Insane Asylum for treatment last Tuesday. Excessive use of alcoholic liquors is the main cause of his deranged mind. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2


JOS. SCHWAB Mr. Jos. Schwab has been making some needed repairs in front of the store in this village of late. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 8, 1875


ALBERT SCHWABE HERMAN SCHWABE AT ALMOST SAME HOUR Brothers, One in City, Other in Country, Meet with Accident On the same day and at almost the same hour Wednesday that a brother in this city met with serious injury, Albert Schwabe, residing on the Range Line road was the victim of an experience similar and as a result it may be necessary to amputate a limb. The accident happened while Mr. Schwabe was assisting in the work of putting up ice, a large cake which was being drawn into the house up an incline, slipping from the tongs and falling upon his limb, badly crushing it, and having the flesh much bruised. It may be that an operation will be necessary, all though friends in the city, of who he has many, will hope for the best. Herman Schwabe the brother who was injured by having his foot crushed under a heavy iron, is improving, and the injury not being as serious as was at first anticipated. The coincidence in the two mishaps and the similarity is peculiar. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, Jan. 18, 1901, p. 1


ABRAHAM SCHWARTZ SOMETHING NEW The first Jewish wedding ever solemnized in Manitowoc county is an event scheduled to take place early in the month of June. The contracting parties are both residents of this city, being Abraham Schwartz, manager of the Manitowoc Iron and Metal Co., and Miss Martha Stein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Stein, of South Tenth street. The celebration of a marriage in accordance with the rites of the Jewish faith is an event of note to all Hebrews and the attendance at the coming event will be large. Invitations will be issued in a few days, and will include many guests from abroad. As is usual a large hall will be secured for the festivities which will take place in the evening. The officiating Rabbi will be from Chicago and elaborate preparations are being made for the nuptials. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 12, 1900, Page 1 (NOTE: They are not in the marriage pages)


ABRAHAM SCHWARTZ MANY OF THE CURIOUS Seek Admittance to Jewish Wedding Performed at Turner Hall Sunday. MADISON RABBI OFFICIATED. Abraham Schwartz and Miss Martha Stein the Bride and Groom-Full Rites of Church Not used. Curiosity directed the steps of many citizens to Turner Opera House Sunday evening where the perfomance of a marriage in accordance with Jewish rites proved a unique and interesting event, witnessed by some 200 people. For several weeks since the announcement of the date of the wedding, there has been considerable interest manifested, and there was no abatement of it up to the time the ceremony was performed. The guests at the ceremony included many from abroad and the participants in the festivities were mainly of the Hebrew race. The performance of the ceremony was to have taken place at 5 o'clock, but it was not until 6:40 that the first move was made. The Jewish marriage service is in itself an interesting study, but the ceremony Sunday evening was not in full accordance with the rites, many features of the service being eliminated and making the whole incomplete. Rabbi Cohen, of Madison, was the officiating prelate. The contracting parties to the wedding were Abraham Schwarz (sic) and Miss Martha Stein and the bridal party included the bride's parents, friends, and a number of flower girls, who officiated. Early in the service the bride was seated in an easy chair in the southwest corner of the hall, and, surrounded by friends and relatives, awaited the march, which is the closing observance. When everything was in readiness two lines, extending the length of the hall, with ribbon strands to the bride's corner, were formed. The Rabbi was stationed in the center of the hall, beneath a canopy supported by four carriers, and as he commenced the reading of the service, the groom accompanied by six of his friends, approached. The bride soon followed, and when both had taken their positions, the Rabbi paused to open a bottle of wine, presenting a glass to the bride, who, after taking a sip, passed it to the groom, it again being handed to the prelate, who dashed it to the floor and broke it, thus it was that two were declared man and wife. During the ceremony each guest was supplied with a lighted candle which was held in the hand during the time. Hats were not removed, this being customary with the Hebrew observance, and even the Rabbi officiated with his head gear in place. After the ceremony the guests marched to the dining hall and partook of refreshments, the bride and groom being at the head of one table for a time and then changing positions to the next. For over three hours the feasting continued and then dancing was the order of the program. Prof. Otto Weinshchenk and an orchestra of five pieces provided the music, both for the ceremony and the dancing. The bride presented a pleasing picture of youth and beauty and many admiring glances were bestowed upon her. Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz will reside here, the groom being engaged in the iron and metal business. The ceremony was somewhat of a disappintment to many who attended, owing to the changes made, but proved interesting, never-the-less. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, June 11, 1900 P. 1


FRED SCHWARTZ Mr. Fred Schwartz, of Reedsville, a graduate of the South Side High School, now a student of the Oshkosh Normal School visited friends on the south side, Friday. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 6, 1901, p. 1


PETER SCHWARZENBART Peter Schwarzenbart celebrated his 61st on 03 Apr. 06 Apr. 1893, Der Nord Westen


DR. SCHWEICHLER Dr. Schweichler removed his office to the frame building just south of the TIMES office. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 25, 1881 P. 1


DR. SCHWEICHLER Dr. Schweichler wishes to inform the public that he will be ready hereafter to receive patients at his new office and residence, corner 8th and Washington Sts., opposite the Court House. Having lately purchased the place from Mr. Henry Greve. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


EDWARD AND LOUIS SCHWEITZER HOME WAS WITHOUT CHARMS St. Nazianz Youngsters Set Out To See The World Uncongenial home surroundings and the hard work of farm life made existence for Edward and Louis Schweitzer, St. Nazianz lads tiresome and Wednesday they set out to see the world and seek a fortune elsewhere, and in consequences of the manner of their departure, officers are now making a search for them. The boys are aged 17 and 14 respectfully and had been at work on the farm. Their mother is dead and the father recently remarried and it is reported that the home life of the children was not made pleasant. The last trace of the youngsters was obtained at Meeme and it was thought they were in this city. Deputy Sheriff John Lelbic of St. Nazianz was here today but was unable to locate the runaways. June 12, 1902, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HENRY SCHWEITZER, JR. Yesterday, about 5 o'clock, Henry Schweitzer, Jr. caught his left hand in the circular saw while working in the Schreihart & Kunz Brewery, cutting off his "gold finger", injuring the middle finger so that it will probably be necessary to amputate it, and damaging the index finger. The 16-year old boy is the son of Mr. Henry Schweitzer who works in this newspaper's office. 01 May 1884, Der Nord Westen


JOHN SCHWEITZER, JR. PATHETIC CASE OF YOUNG GIRL WIFE, WEDDED YEAR AGO, TODAY COMMITTED TO ASYLUM Wedded little over a year ago, applicant for a divorce at the last term of circuit court and today and inmate of the state hospital at Oshkosh, the story of Mrs. John Schweitzer, Jr., is a pathetic one. Mrs. Schweitzer was adjudged insane by physicians following an inquiry in probate court yesterday. Mrs. Schweitzer, nee Miss DeLord, was married a year ago to John Schweitzer, Jr., a barber and in January filed suit for divorce alleging that Schweitzer failed to support her and her child. A previous complaint had been filed but was withdrawn. In the examination yesterday it was said that the girl mother had recently during a temporary fit of violent insanity, attempted the life of her child. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 10, 1915 Page 5 ============================================== John Schweitzer, Jr., who is said to have failed to pay some $75 under court orders, is in jail. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 18, 1916 P.8


AGGIE SCOTT Two Rivers news: Miss Aggie Scott, one of Two Rivers proficient school teachers, is at present visiting her sister, Mrs. Byron, of Kewaunee. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.2


MRS. C.B. SCOTT Mrs. C. McCombs, and daughter, Miss Valeiare, of Omro, are the guests of her sister Mrs. C.B. Scott at 1201 Marshall St. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, Nov. 24, 1899 P.2


GEORGE SCOVE Henry Thompson Departs for the Klondyke Regions to Accept Position. Conduct Extensive Farm. To Be Associated with George Scove(?) in the Raising of Fur Bearing Animals Money in Sight. Lured on by the prospect of acquiring some of the glittering gold that lies buried in the cold Klondyke regions, Henry Thompson, of the city will leave the warm temperate climate of his native state and journey to the land of promise and icebergs. Mr. Thompson has not the same object in view as that which prompts others who go to Alaska, but will be employed in a more certain venture than that of digging for the yellow metal. He will be employed on a farm on the mainland, and will be associated with George Scove, a former Manitowoc man, who is engaging in the raising of fur bearing animals. The Scove farm is conducted on a extensive scale and embraces a large acreage. The proprietor, who left here some five years ago, has been highly successful since engaging in his present business, and has recently enlarged upon his operation, necessitating additional help to carry on the farm. Mr. Thompson who is an old friend, was induced to accept the management of the business and is now enroute (sic) to his new home. In no section of the country are the conditions for this new and lucrative industry more adapted than in the Alaskan region, and the facilities are such that success is almost a foregone conclusion. Friends of the two men anticipate the fulfillment of their fondest expectations. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 28, 1901, p. 1


NORMAN SCOVE Norman Scove has about recoverd from a serious attack of the grip. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Monday, January 23, 1899 P. 4


THOMAS SEARS Meeme news: Thomas Sears, who has for sometime been sojourning in Colorado and other parts of the west, returned to his home in Meeme recently. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 4


LAWRENCE SEBATSKY CRIME ON INCREASE Municipal Court Kept Busy Hearing Criminal Actions. ASSAULT CASES IN MAJORITY. One of the Worst Yet Tried to Come up Tomorrow-Ulness Bound Over on Criminal Charge-Other Cases. About the worst case of assault and battery that has ever come before the Municipal court came up this morning when Lawrence Sebatsky was arrested on that charge, preferred by Mike Taddick. Taddick was about the worst used up man that has ever appeared before the court and when he swore out the warrant this morning told the story of a saloon battle that must have been a terror while it lasted. It seems that Taddick was at Sebatsky's saloon, corner Fifteenth and Madison streets, last evening and while there started to quarrel with the man. At first they only hit each other with their hats and then, Taddick alleges, Sebatsky went behind the bar and secured a round from a stair railing and used it with telling effect upon the complainant's head. His face is all scratched up, one eye discolored from a blow and his head covered with a number of bad gashes. A doctor was called to attend him last evening and for a time it was feared he would loose his life. In court this morning Sebatsky pleaded not guilty to the charge and the case was set for hearing for tomorrow afternoon. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 20, 1903 P. 1


C.H. SEDGWICK JR. The law firm of Sedgwick, Sedgwick & Schmidt has an addition. C.H. Sedgwick Jr., who made appearance on the scene Tuesday evening will undoubtedly follow in the footsteps of his grandsire and father. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, January 13, 1904 P. 1


FLORENCE SEDGWICK BELOIT HOLDS EXERCISES. Graduating Class Contains Name of Florence Sedgwick From Here. Fifty seventh annual commencement of Beloit college which numbers many graduates from this city was held yesterday. Miss Florence Sedgwick of Manitowoc is included in the 1904 class roll of studetns who have finished school, and received her diploma. The exercises in connection with the graduation were impressive and were conducted with the solemnity usually co-incident with these events. A total of forty-six students were numbered in the graduating class, this year, which is an unusually large one. Relatives of Miss Sedgwick were in attnedance. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, June 22, 1904 P. 5


FLORENCE SEDGWICK Miss Florence Sedgwick, daughter of G.G. Sedgwick here, has accepted a teaching position in Sheboygan. 31 Aug. 1905, Der Nord Westen


G.G. SEDGWICK G.G. Sedgwick, well-known local resident who has been ill recently, suffered a stroke Sunday morning and his left side is paralyzed… He is a veteran of the Civil War. 29 Nov. 1906, From Der Nord Westen ******* Death Monday morning of George G. Sedgewick after a 2-month illness with heart trouble. Mr. Sedgewick had suffered a stroke on 25 November which paralyzed his left side. At the time it was thought that the end was near, but because over time he slowly improved, his actual death was unanticipated. Mr. Sedgewick was born 13 February 1843 in Andover, New York. That same year he came west with his parents and settled in Bloomington, Illinois, where he grew up. In 1862 Mr. Sedgewick served in the 115th Illinois Infantry Regiment for a year and received a medical discharge. In 1864 he reentered the Army, this time with 132nd Illinois Infantry Regiment, and served until the end of the war. After the war he moved to Port Washington and took a post with G.W. Foster to study law, went to Kewaunee in 1874 and came to Manitowoc in 1880 where he has lived ever since. He was one of our most eminent attorneys. He was a member of the local post of the G.A.R. and was also a member of Knights of Pythias and the local Odd Fellows Lodge. His funeral will take place this afternoon at 2 p.m. from the Presbyterian Church. Der Nord Westen, 31 Jan. 1907


HARRY SEDLACHEK Larrabee news: A farewell party was given to Harry and Rudolph Sedlachek who left for Superior last week. Feb. 5, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


J. SEDLACHEK Larrabee news: Mrs. and Mrs. Ed. Leamon of Superior visited with Mrs. Leamon's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Sedlachek. From here they will leave for Detroit to make their home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 1, 1916 P.2


LOUIS SEDLACHEK Larrabee news: Smallpox and mumps are both going through this town. The homes of Joe Hronek, Louis Sedlachek, Wenzel Ramash of this vicinity are quarantined, also many other homes in neighboring districts. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 24, 1916 P.4


RUDOLPH SEDLACHEK Larrabee news: A farewell party was given to Harry and Rudolph Sedlachek who left for Superior last week. Feb. 5, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


RUDOLPH SEDLICHEK Larrabee news: Rudolph Sedlichek of Superior is visiting his parents and brother here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, April 19, 1916 P.4


ERNST SEEGAR, MRS. Mrs. Peter Shea has returned to her home at DePere after visiting here with her mother, Mrs. Ernst Seegar, on Park street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 9, 1916 P.3


FRED SEEGER Mr. Fred. Seeger, publishes a notice in the Pilot of last week, in which he states that his wife is not sick with the typhoid fever. We are glad to hear it. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


MRS. FRED SEEGER Mrs. Fred. Seeger is said to be low with typhoid fever. Her many friends will anxiously pray for her speedy recovery from that dread disease. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 20, 1881 P. 1 (Note: This may be Minnie Seeger who died in Jan. of 1882.)


L. SEEGER (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


LOUIS SEEGER, JR. Louis Seeger, Jr., finding the barber business not very congenial to his health, has quit it, and now tries his hand at clerking. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 4, 1881 P.1


LOUIS SEEGER, MRS. Mrs. Louis Seeger celebrated her 74th birthday on Sun. 14 Feb. 1901, Der Nord Westen


MRS. SEEGER Mrs. Peter Shen, of DePere, is here to visit her mother, Mrs. Seeger, at her home on Park street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 6, 1916 P.3


R. SEEGER R. Seeger of Manitowoc has opened a barber shop on the south side. -Kaukauna Sun. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3


DR. WILL SEEGER Dr. Will. Seeger has rented the rooms in the rear of his Dental Parlors, and will fit them up in elegant style and use them as a waiting room for his patients. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1 ******** Dr. Seeger says he has never had such a brave patient as Mr. Jas. Conway, of Meeme. He never flinched when the nerve of a tooth was struck. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 1


WILLIAM M. SEEGER Wm. M. Seeger has just opened his Dental Rooms in Anderson's new brick block, two doors south of the post office. He has just received a chair with all the latest improvements; it is really a marvel of beauty and mechanism. His tools are all new, and of the best make; in fact, his whole outfit is of the latest style and he is well able to perform any operation in his line. Will learned to extract teeth while yet a little boy, and it is as natural to him as it is to talk. He studied diligently, while at the Cincinnatti Dental College, the subject of filling teeth and making plates. He is qualified to furnish a set of teeth as good as any in the city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 4, 1881 P.1


CHARLES SEEHASE, DR. Dr. and Mrs. Charles Seehase departed for Chicago this morning to attend the graduation exercises at which Miss Marie Seehase will receive her diploma as a nurse. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 12, 1916 P.3


JOHN SEIBEL Kossuth news: The home of John Seibel was made happy last week by arrival of a brand new daughter. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 15, 1886 P.1


W.E. SEIBEL Edward Schaffland and W.E. Seibel and families were participants at a large party at Two Rivers Sunday, a reunion of the Stockmeyer and Zlatnik families at which more than sixty guests attended. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 26, 1903 P. 2


W.E. SEIBEL Joseph M. Seibel, of Marinette, state parole agent of the state board of control, is in town visiting his brother, W.E. Seibel. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 24, 1916 P.2


W. E. SEIBEL 4 GENERATIONS SEIBEL FAMILY GIVEN WRITE-UP Milwaukee Paper Publishes Cut of Castor Seibel Family Four generations of the Seibel family, of which W.E. Seibel of this city, is a son, are shown in a cut published by the Milwaukee Sentinel Sunday, together with a story, under Marinette dateline. The cut contains the picture of Castor Seibel, of Two Rivers, father of W.E. Seibel, and past 80 years of age, but still active; Joseph Seibel, state patrol agent, 58, his daughter, Mrs. Russel Lamb, 26, of LaPorte, Ind., and her son, Master Lloyd Russell, aged two. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 22, 1916 P.1


WILLIAM SEIBEL William Seibel, the clothing man, had a close call from a bad accident when his car was bumped by a street car on South Eighth street. Mr. Seibel turned out to pass another rig and a street car, bearing down upon him from the rear, and which he says he did not hear give warning, struck his machine amidships, damaging the automobile by bending the fender and running board. Fortunately the car was not hit squarely or the accident would have been much more serious in its results. Mr. Seibel was uninjured. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, May 4, 1916 P.3


FRANK SEIDEL Kellnersville news: Frank Seidl and Anton Bruno both of whom were married here on Monday will leave with their wives for Chippewa Co. in a few days. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4 ******* (Note: A Francis Seidel and an Anton Bruner were both married on Dec. 29, 1884 which was the last Tuesday of the year. Anton married Anna Seidel. On the 1880 census there is a Frank Sidle age 23 and his sister Ann Sidle age 17. These are probably the two Seidel people in the marriages and article. Also an Anton Bruno lived in the dwelling after the Sidle one on the census. I'm listing them under the names in the marriages so they can be found.)


F.W. SEIDL F.W. Seidl will open his hotel the first of May. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 28, 1885 P.3


FRANK SEIDL Frank Seidl, celebrated his 45th on Monday. 02 July 1896, Der Nord Westen


MARY SEIDL There was a family reunion at the home of Mrs. Mary Seidl in the town of Kossuth last Sunday. Relatives, who had not met before in three years, were gathered about the fireside and the day was most pleasantly passed in reviving old memories. Six sons-in-law and their families were also in attendance. They were Frank Pellischek, Stephen Krainik, Paul Staudt, Joseph Kromfuest, Frank Urban and Louis Vraney. May 27, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MARY F. SEIDL The following estates were admitted to probate during the month of February, 1916: Joseph Drill; Isaac Halverson; Jacob Tossen; Morgan Connell; Mervin Geraldson; Ernst Vogelsang; Joseph Holly; Torger K. Hougen; Sidona Boettger; Mary F. Seidl; Simon Stok; Dorothea Schmidt; Rankchild Anderson; Joseph Thalhammer; Catherine Lenerville. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 4, 1916 P.5


MIKE SEIDL A team belonging to Mike Seidl ran away Saturday night and demolished the rig. The team became frightened when near the toll gate and never stopped going until they reached Four Corners. No one was injured. June 5, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. SEIFKE The 3-year old son of Mr. Seifke, was playing in the house on Hancock Street, and a cow wounded him in the face with its horns. The Dr. was called, but the wounds were determined not to be life threatening. 07 July 1881, Der Nord Westen


EMIL SEITZ Messrs. Ernst Wagner and Emil Seitz have decided to make a permanent move to Los Angeles, Calif. Both are already there and will soon have their families follow. 24 Apr. 1902, Der Nord Westen


IGNATZ SEITZ Mr. Ignatz Seits (sic) is putting up a new cooper shop opposite Rahr's malt house. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 8, 1881 P. 1


JOSEPH SEITZ Jos. Seitz of the firm of Beigel & Seitz had his hand painfully scalded while making a connection of a steam pipe at Schuette Bros. store. Jan. 27, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPH SEITZ (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 06 May) Joseph Seitz celebrated his 34th birthday last week with friends and relatives. 09 May 1901, Der Nord Westen


ROSE SEITZ Misses Rose Seitz, Viola Miller, Josephine Craite, Helen Hess and Rose Teitgen have returned to Milwaukee to resume their studies at Normal school after spending Easter at their home here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 24, 1916 P.3


CHARLES SELK Charles Selk, who visited Hilbert to investigate the identity of the man recently found dead there and who is believed to be Louis Selk, a brother, had decided not to have the body removed at this time, though convinced that the man is his relative. Some mystery surrounds Selk's death and detectives are at work to determine whether the man was the victim of a murderous assault or a suicide. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 12, 1916 P.3


CHRISTIAN SELK (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 07 Aug.) Mrs. M. Arnold from Milwaukee was here for a visit and stayed at the Waverly Hotel. Mrs. Arnold was first married to Christian Selk who operated a store in Mishicott. After Mr. Selk's death she married Mr. Arnold, a countryman of your correspondent, and they moved to Milwaukee. Mr. Arnold is with the firm of Arnold & Quistorf there…and went to Colorado several weeks ago for reasons of health. During his absence Mrs. Arnold will be visiting her mother, Mrs. L. Koehnke in Mishicott. 10 Aug. 1905, Der Nord Westen ******** Order to Hear Petition for Final Settlement. (First Publication July 15, 1884.) In the matter of the estate of Christiaa (sic) L.F. Selk, deceased. On reading and filing the petition of Mary Arnold (nee Selk) excentrix of the estate of said deceased for the adjustment and allowance of her administration account and the assignment of the residue of said estate to ???? other persons as are by law entitled to the same; It is ordered that said account be examined, adjusted and allowed at a special term of said court to be held at the office of the County Judge in the city of Manitowoc in said County, on Tuesday, the 12th day in August A.D., 1884, at ten o'clock A.M. of said day. It is further ordered that upon the adjustment and allowance of such account by this Court as aforesaid, the residue of said estate be, by the further order and judgement of this Court, assigned to such persons as are by law entitled to the same. It is further ordered, that notice of the time and place of the examination and allowance of such account ???? of the assignment of the residue of said estate be given to all persons interested, by publication of this order for three successive weeks before said day, in the Lake Shore Times a weekly newspaper printed and published at the city of Manitowoc and State of Wisconsin. Dated July 8th, A.D. 1884. By the Court, R.D. Smart, County Judge. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 23, 1884 P.3 (NOTE: Despite the (nee Selk) in the notice, I believe this goes with this Christian Selk)


GEORGE SENDRA, SR. On Monday, George Sendra, Sr. was just getting down from his wagon when the team of horses started up, throwing him down so he suffered injuries to his head and several other parts of his body. 16 May 1889, Der Nord Westen


O.H. SENGLAUB Mr. and Mrs. O.H. Senglaub are parents of a son. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, January 28, 1904 P. 6


OTTO SENGLAUB Otto Senglaub, who has been spending a few days with his folks returned to Wabena (sic) this morning to resume his work as book-keeper for Bush Bros., at that city. Oct. 22, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


RUDOLPH SENGLAUB Rudolph Senglaub will take his departure Monday for Vera Cruz, Mexico, where he will make his future home. Mr. Senglaub will be employed on the large building of Dusbolt & Co., in that city. Many friends will wish him success. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, Dec. 9, 1899 P.1


MRS. JOHN SESTAK Mrs. John Sestak of Francis Creek sustained a fracture to an arm by falling, on Saturday. Dr. Pritchard of this city attended the injured woman. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, June 21, 1904 P. 6


ERWIN SEVERSON LOCAL MAN BADLY BURNED AT KEWAUNEE Full extent of the seriousness of burns suffered by Erwin Severson, 108 Riverview Drive, employed by the Wisconsin Public Service corporation at Kewaunee has not yet been determined by his attending physician it was said today. Severson was burned severely about the right hand and forearm when he came in contact with a high voltage wire at Kewaunee on Friday. He was brought to Kewaunee and given treatment and then removed to Manitowoc. His condition became more serious and he was removed to the hospital this morning. It was said the burns are extremely deep and the man is suffering excruciating pains. Manitowoc Herald News, Tuesday, September 04, 1928 Page 1


O. SEVERSON Eaton news: Mr. O. Severson, of Shawano, was here to see his brothers last week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, August 11, 1885 P.3


P. SEVERSON Niles news: Mr. P. Severson is quite sick with lung fever. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 9, 1886 P.3


WILHELM SEYRING Wilhelm Seyring, who is visiting Alvin Lange here, celebrated his 77th birthday on 21 Mar. Despite his age he is as lively as a weasel. 28 Mar. 1901, Der Nord Westen


MRS. SHAEFER AND DAU. OHMA Little 5-year old Ohma Shaefer was an unusual heroine Saturday by saving her mother's life. While Mrs. Shaefer was cleaning clothes with gasoline, she lit a match - there was an explosion and her clothing caught fire. The little girl rushed over and without hesitation stripped off her mother's clothing and in so doing suffered burns herself. Neighbors came and the lady was saved, but the child herself was burned. She was taken to the hospital as quickly as possible, and the outlook will be forthcoming. 23 Apr. 1908, Der Nord Westen


OTTMAR SHALLERN Ottmar Shallern was recently elected Junior Warden of the Masonic lodge at Ripon. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


J. SHAMBEAU, MRS. (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 07 Nov.) Mrs. J. Shambeau, who has been staying here with her parents, will soon go to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to join her husband who is working there and where they will make their residence. 09 Nov. 1905, Der Nord Westen


FRANK SHAMROCK Frank Shamrock, of Two Rivers and Miss Anna Salansky, of this city, were married at the St. Mary's Polish Catholic church this morning by Rev. Kryzwonos. The couple will make their home at Two Rivers. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, November 26, 1902 P. 1


DANIEL SHANAHAN Melancholy Accident - On Monday last, Mr. Daniel Shanahan, residing about four miles from this village, was driving his team from a farm beyond his residence and on his way home, the horses from some cause ran away, throwing him out, hurting him severely. He was taken up insensible and conveyed home. His skull was fractured and otherwise injured. Mr. Shanahan is one of the most respectable citizens of this county, well liked by all and his many friends ardently hope for an early recovery. On Wednesday, Mr. S. was improving a little and strong hopes were entertained for his recovery. Manitowoc Pilot, Fri. July 29, 1859


DANIEL SHANAHAN Recovering - the numerous friends of Mr. Daniel Shanahan who was severely injured last week by being thrown from his wagon, will be happy to learn that he is recovering and will shortly be in his usual health. Manitowoc Pilot, Aug. 12, 1859


MALACHI SHANAHAN St. Nazians (sic) news: Malachi Shanahan of Nebraska returned home a few weeks ago. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.2


GUSTAVE SHARBACH In the list of marriage licenses issued in Milwaukee county under date of January 26, is one to Herman Kantsch (sic), of Cato, Manitowoc county and Miss Gustave Sharbach, of Milwaukee, residence 211 Fifth street. Katsch (sic) is unknown in this city and is thought to be a new resident at Cato. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, January 27, 1904 P. 4


JOHN SHARIDON Word was received here this morning by Henry Mulholland, of the death of John Sharidon, a 16 year old youth formerly a reident (sic) of Meeme. His demise occurred at Elizbeth, N.J. Mr. Mulholland was appointed guardian of the boy and his sister, sometime ago. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, June 25, 1904 P. 5


EDWARD SHARP ALMOST DROWNED.- EDWARD SHARP, well known to our citizens, came near being drowned, on Friday evening last. In company with one or two other boys, he went to bathe in the river near the saw mill of B. Jones & C., and before he knew, got out into the deep water, and being unable to swim, sank three times and was about to sink again when Fredrick Albee rescued him. Fred. deserves to be put on record for his manly courage. June 28, 1858 P. 3, The Daily Tribune


DR. J. L. SHAW Dr. J.L. Shaw, who has been taking post graduate work at Chattanooga, Tenn., and Chicago, and who was confined to the hospital at Chicago for a few days with an infected foot, has returned here to resume his practice. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, June 3, 1916 P.2


ALLAN SHEA Allan Shea, who has been employed as night clerk at the Williams House for the past two years, has resigned his position to accept one at the C. & N.W. railroad in the freight offices at Milwuakee. He leaves for Milwaukee tonight to take up his new duties. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, April 20, 1916 P.3


PETER SHEA, MRS. Mrs. Peter Shea has returned to her home at DePere after visiting here with her mother, Mrs. Ernst Seegar, on Park street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, May 9, 1916 P.3


P.J. SHEA Mrs. P.J. Shea is at Milwaukee, called there by a message announcing the serious illness of her son, Edward. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Feb. 23, 1916 P.3 ********* Allen Shea is at Milwaukee, called there by the illness of his brother, Edward, who is in a hospital suffering from typhoid fever. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Feb. 23, 1916 P.3


JOHN SHEAHAN, SON OF DISTRESSING ACCIDENT.- On Wednesday evening, a son of Mr. John Sheahan, aged about 14, was thrown off a horse, and had his arm broken by the fall. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, September 23, 1859 P.3


FRANK SHEBESTA TWO RIVERS MAN PAYS AS 1ST SPEEDER Frank Shebesta First Speeder Fined for Year of 1915 Two Rivers turned the first money into municipal court for membership in the speeders club this year when Frank Shebesta, of that city, was arraigned yesterday upon complaint filed by Officer Henry Martin of that city and pleaded guilty to the charge of violating the speed laws. Shebesta paid a fine of $10 and costs totaling $14.58. Shebesta was charged by the officer with running his automobile at a speed of 22 miles an hour on Washington street in Two Rivers. He is a subagent for the Ford car. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 16, 1915, Page 1


DANIEL SHEEHY Want news of Thomas Sheehy, a native of Newcastle West, County Limerick. When last heard from, in 1860, he was in Memphis, Tenn., engaged as fireman on a railroad. Information concerning him will be thankfully received by his father, Daniel Sheehy, Paquette P.O., Manitowoc County, Wis. [Paquette was in Franklin township, est. 31 Dec. 1858, disct. 19 Aug. 1870] 01 December 1866 From classified information wanted ads in The Irish-American-published weekly in New York City. The ads were used to try to locate relatives who entered America in 1849 during the exodus from Ireland. There are microfilmed copies of the original newspapers available at the New York State Library and the New York Public Library.


JOHN SHEPPERT FINGER OFF FROM ACCIDENT. John Sheppert, Seating Co. Employe, Crippled Under Knife at Factory. Injury necessitating the amputation of the third finger on the left hand was suffered by John Sheppert, a young lad employed at the factory of the Manitowoc Seating Co. today. The accident resulted while Sheppert was operating a machine, a knife which revolves several hundred times in a minute having fallen on the hand. The whole hand was badly lacerated and two fingers were so badly cut that the amputation of one was immediately necessary and the other may have to be taken off. Drs. Paine & Hubbard operated. Sheppert resides with his parents on the south side. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 19, 1903 P. 1


E. SHERMAN (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


E.S. SHERMAN E.S. Sherman celebrated his 57th yesterday. He says he felt just "like a boy with a brand new pair of red top boots". Mar. 24, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


E.S. SHERMAN E.S. Sherman of this city is one of the men living today who voted for Abraham Lincoln, though not in the first campaign of the martyred president. Mr. Sherman, who was 22 at that time, voted for Lincoln in the 1864 campaign. Feb. 14, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******* E.S. Sherman, who has been spending the past month with his daughter at Appleton, returned Saturday. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 29, 1916 P.2


EUGENE SHERMAN The sociable at the residence of Eugene Sherman was enjoyed by a large number. The grounds were illuminated by Chinese lanterns and the young people enjoyed themselves at croquet and other games out door, which proves the evening to have been unusually favorable. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 6, 1886 P.3


JULIUS SHERWALT A house and barn belonging to Julius Sherwalt of the Town of Two Rivers was burned to the ground on Wednesday morning last. The family were wakened by the howling of a dog just in time to same themselves from being smothered. The entire furniture and bedding in the house were consumed and a horse in the stable was smothered. The origin of the fire is unknown. The house was insured. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 29, 1886 P.3


SHERWOOD'S NOTE: The following was in the Sunday Telegraph of Milwaukee. The case referred to by the Fort Collins (Col) Courier in the following is of interest to the people in Manitowoc, the Sherwoods having lived there for many years. Mrs. Sherwood, who brings the suit, is a daughter of Durgin, a pioneer of Manitowoc, and at one time a lumber man. A large sum is involved in the suit. The Courier says: The case Sherwood vs. Sherwood is on trial in the county court. It is expected to consume the whole week. The Plaintiff is ripresented (sic) by Major Smith, of the firm of Wells, Smith & Macon, Denver and Haynes, Dunning and Haynes; and the defendant by Messrs Rhodes & Love and Judge E.A. Ballard. This suitis brought by Mrs. Sherwood, widow of the late Judge Jessie Sherwood, agains F.W. Sherwood for a settlement and accounting of partnership interests. The case has excited considerable interest in this county, where the parties are all well known and highly respected. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 14, 1882 P. 1


JESSE M. SHERWOOD Jesse M. went to Green Bay to see a gold crusher which crushed his finger. 21 Jun 1860, Manitowoc Herald ****** Jesse M. left for Pike's Peak 27 Sep 1860, Manitowoc Herald


WILLIAM SHERWOOD Left for Pike's Peak 30 Aug 1860, Manitowoc Herald


CHARLES SHIMEK MAY CAUSE HIS DEATH Charles Shimek, Aged 21 Is The Victim of a Peculiar Accident, May Die SUSTAINS FRACTURED SKULL Heavy Sign Board Falls and Strikes Him on the Head-Is at the Hospital Charles Shimek, a young man employed in the tailoring department at O. Torrison Co.'s, met with a peculiar accident shortly after noon today, which may result in his death. At present he is at Holy Family hospital and is resting easy, but his injuries are of a nature that makes his recovery a matter of considerable doubt. While on his way home from work and when passing the book store of G.W. Fechter on North Eighth street, a large sign which hung suspended over the sidewalk, fell, striking the young man on the head and fractured the skull. He was bleeding profusely from the nose and mouth when picked up. An examination was made by Drs. Paine and Patchen and it was found that the fracture was very serious. The ambulance was summoned and the young man removed to the hospital, where a more thorough investigation revealed the fact that the fracture was nearly four inches in length and extended from the top of the head, a little to the left, forward. All medical attention was given and when the injuries were dressed, the patient rested quietly. Shimek formerly resided at Reedsville and entered the employ of the Torrison Company, March 1. He is 21 years of age and a bright young fellow, who has made hosts of friends since his arrival here. His father died some years ago and his mother, who resides at Reedsville was notified this afternoon of the accident will arrive this evening. The high wind prevailing to-day undoubtedly loosened the sign and it was Shimek's misfortune to be passing at the time. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 14, 1900, Page 1


EMIL SHIMEK REEDSVILLE BOY SHOT WHILE FIRING TARGET While target shooting with several boy friends, Emil, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Shimek met with a serious injury. The boys had placed a percussion cap of dynamite on a rock and were using it as a target. Emil fired, hit the cap which bounded backward and entered the abdomen through his clothing. After the accident the boy walked to his home in Reedsville, a distance of two miles and to the office of Dr. Cary who after an examination had him removed to the Holy Family hospital at Manitowoc where an operation to remove the bullet was performed. The condition of the boy is as good as could be expected and his recovery is looked for. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, Nov. 05, 1915, Page 1


LOUIS SHIMEK AND PEARL SHIMEK BURNED WIFE WITH HOT POKER AND THEN THREATENED HER LIFE THIS IS CHARGE ON WHICH LOUIS SHIMEK IN JAIL IN DEFAULT OF PEACE BOND DIVORCE PETITION SAID TO BE BEHIND TROUBLE Angered it is said, by the action of his wife in instituting divorce proceedings and securing an order for temporary alimony, in which he is reported to have defaulted, Louis Shimek is alleged to have violated a circuit court order enjoining him from interfering with her and it is charged visited her home and attacked the woman, beating and bruising her and threatening her life. As a result Shimek must furnish a peace bond of $400 and pay costs or go to jail for five months. The man had failed to furnish the bond today and is in jail. A story of domestic infelicity and alleged abuse was told by Mrs. Pearl Shimek, wife of the defendant in municipal court yesterday afternoon when Shimek pleaded not guilty to the charge of beating her on Sunday and with threatening her life. From the testimony the couple, married a year, have never lived happily and twice the wife has filed divorce proceedings in court. The first papers were filed several weeks ago when she alleged Shimek had beaten her and struck her with a heated poker, severely burning her arm. Later the suit was withdrawn and the couple "made up" and decided to start ?. It was the same old story over again, according to the testimony of Mrs. Shimek and when patience ceased to longer be a virtue she renewed the divorce suit and secured an order in court for temporary alimony and restraining Shimek from interfering with her and her child, a boy of 9 months. On the occasion of the assault in which the heated poker was used, Shimek was arrested on a charge of assault and battery and pleaded guilty. He was released on probation by Judge Schmidt in municipal court after he had paid the costs and up to March 6, when the probation period expired, is said not to have troubled his wife. Sunday, however, he visited the home again and following a quarrel attacked the woman and she says threatened to kill her. A warrant was issued Monday and Shimek was in court yesterday. After Shimek had denied the charges made by his wife and the woman had told her story to the court, Judge Schmidt ordered that Shimek furnish a peace bond in sum of $400 for four months or be committed to jail for that time. Shimek was also ordered to pay the costs or serve an additional month, making five in all in jail. He was unable to comply with the court orders and was committed to jail. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 31, 1915, Page 1


LOUIS SHIMEK Shimek Case Up The case of the State vs. Louis Shimek followed the Wagner case and was near its close this afternoon. Shimek is charged with assault with intent to do great bodily harm upon his wife. Shimek has been in jail for several weeks awaiting trial. Testimony in the Shimek case ended at 2:30 and arguments in the case were opened by Dist. Atty. Schmidtz. Attorney J.J. Healy appears for Shimek who is charged with having attacked his divorced wife with a razor. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, January 18, 1916 P.1 ******** Shimek Guilty of Assault Louis Shimek, who faced a term at Waupun on a charge of assault with intent to commit great bodily harm to his divorced wife and who has been in jail since last August, was found guilty of assault with intent, the jury returning this verdict after an hour's deliberation. The court submitted three forms of verdict, not guilty, guilty of assault with intent to do great bodily harm, and assault without intent. The court did not submit the second count of the complaint, assault and battery. The penalty for assault is a fine or jail sentence whereas assault with intent carries a prison sentence or a heavy fine. Shimek was on the stand in his own behalf and denied using a razor in an attack as was charged by his divorced wife. Attorney John Healy appeared for Shimek and Districk Attorney Schmitz for the state. Shimek will be sentenced later. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, January 19, 1916 P.1 ******* The Herald, in a write-up of the verdict in the Shimek case yesterday, stated that the jury had found Shimek guilty of assault with intent. It should have read "assault without intent." The verdict held Shimek guilty only of plain assault, a misdemeanor. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, January 20, 1916 P.8


EDWARD SHIMON REEDSVILLE BOY LOSES A HAND Edw. Shemon (sic), Aged 18, is Crippled in Saw He Was Operating Edward Shemon, a Reedsville youth lost his right hand as result of an accident at the Rusch sawmill in that village this morning, the hand being severed at the wrist. The accident happened while Shemon, who was an employe of the mill was operating one of the big saws and the hand was almost completely severed by the saw being so terribly mutilated that amputation was performed at once. Shemon was using his left hand to operate the lever controlling the saw and had reached over with the right to place a piece of slab wood which he was cutting, in the saw when in some manner his hand was caught with the slab and drawn into the saw in the shock of the accident Shemon whose hand was on the lever which would have thrown off the saw was unable to do so and the hand was severed. Shemon is 18 years of age and one of the best known young men of Reedsville and sympathy is extended to him. The boy will be crippled for life. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, January 18, 1911 Page 1 (Note: This may be Edward Shimon in #77 St. Mary's Catholic cemetery)


FRANK SHIMON, MRS. Brockville news: Mrs. Frank Shimon is spending a couple of days with her daughter, Mrs. Joe Fiddler at Maribel. Feb. 26, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRANK SHIMON, SR. Melnik news: Frank Shimon, Sr., has returned home from Rice Lake, Wis., where he spent a few weeks with his brother, Joseph. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, April 25, 1916 P.4


MAYME SHIMON Brockville news: Miss Mayme Shimon departed for a couple of days' visit with her sister, Mrs. Jos. Fiddler. Feb. 26, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. SHIMONEK Mr. Shimonek of this city received a pleasant surprise on the occasion of his seventieth birthday from his old pupils in Bohmia. They sent him an oil picture of the school building where he instructed them over thirty years ago. It was a h andsome compliment which was fully appreciated by the recipient. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 12, 1886 P.2


JOHN SHIMONEK Conine & Fischbein have appointed the following sub-agents for the Mutual Hail Insurance Co: Manitowoc County Peter Rau John Shimonek Morris Mann Kewaunee County Chas. Tisch Fred. Werner Hermann Pautz Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 15, 1875


LOUIS M. SHIPPER, MRS. Mrs. P. Case has returned to Fayette, Mich., after an extended visit with her daughter, Mrs. Louis M. Shipper, at Two Rivers. Feb. 7, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRANK SHITSKA THEY NEVER SPEAK. But No Telling What Will Happen When Uraynok Gets Out of Jail. Ninety-days in the county jail. This was the sentence Judge Craite imposed Chas. Uraynok when he was informed that he couldn't pay a fine of $10 and costs, amounting in all to $48.47. Uraynok was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Meany at Rockland yesterday of a charge of assult and battery, preferred by Frank Shitska. Last Sunday it seems that Uraynok, Shitska and a man named Krause visited Reedsville. While there they thoroughly enjoyed themselves and celebrated Easter in a manner well pleasing to themselves. They indulged freely in the "joyful" and before evening an altercation arose. It is claimed that Uraynok and Krause attacked Shitska and pounded him so unmercifully that even his relatives did'nt (sic) recognize him. He swore out a warrant for both, and Uraynok pleaded guilty in Municipal court yesterday and the result is given above. Krause was discharged as there was no evidence against him. Apr. 8, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. GEORGE SHON School Hill news: Mr. and Mr. (sic) Wertz of Hilbert have been visiting here, called here by the sickness of their sister Mrs. George Shon whose recovery is very doubtful. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


A. SHOVE ACCIDENT.- Mr. A. Shove was seriously injured by being thrown from a Wagon on the pier last Friday Evening. His jaw was broken and he was otherwise injured but we learn that he is expected to recover. Apr. 10, 1856, Manitowoc Tribune


DELLE SHOVE Cato news: John Laurence was in Cato last week visiting his cousins, Mrs. J.E. Harris, Miss Delle Shove, and Miss Cora Laurence. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 21, 1882 P. 10


DELLE SHOVE Misses Delle Shove, Annie Heinemann and Mary Packard who wield the birch over unruly pupils in Kewaunee are spending their holidays with their relatives in this city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 23, 1884 P.3


DELLE SHOVE Miss Delle Shove who has for the past two years been teaching in Kewaunee goes this coming year to Ahnapee. She will have charge of the Grammar Dep't. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.3


H.A. SHOVE DARING BURGLARY. Spring guns, man traps and vigilance committees are in order. The villains who have been driven from other places by the determined action of the citizens and officers, are evidently collecting in Manitowoc. On Saturday night the Boot and Shoe Store of H.A. Shove was broken open and about $50 worth of property taken. The Jewelry Store near the corner of York and Eighth Street was also the subject of a burglarious attempt, but the rascals were evidently disturbed before they had accomplished their designs. The front door was nearly cut through, but nothing was disturbed on the inside. We give the scoundrels notice, in the most emphatic manner, that if they attempt their nefarious game in some parts of the village they will be subjects of a coroner's inquest instead of a Justice's court. July 13, 1858 P. 3, The Daily Tribune


MARY SHOVE Miss Mary Shove has so far recovered from her recent illness as to be able to again attend to her duties at Schuette's store. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 29, 1881 P. 1


MRS. R.A. SHOVE A tramp entered the house of Mrs. R.A. Shove on Sixth St. between the hours of one and two on Sunday morning. His entrance aroused some one of the family who immediately awakened the other members, and together they pre-cuted(?) themselves to the no doubt astonished eyes of their visitor who did not seem to be expecting so much attention. Fortunately Marshal Blake lives so near that he was easily summoned and the guest was conducted to a place prepared for such as he. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 27, 1885 P.3


T.C. SHOVE Business card: Banking and Exchange Office -of- T. C. SHOVE, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. U.S. BONDS (7-30's, 5-20's, and all other kinds) purchased, sold and exchanged. Coupons on Interest Warrants cashed. Gold, Silver, and Coin drafts purchased at the highest market rates. Drafts, on all the principal cities of the United States and Canada, bought and sold. Foreign Exchange, on Great Britain and Continental Europe, for sale in sums to suit. Deposits received, subject to sight draft. Also interest paid on deposits by special agreement. Collections made on all parts of the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and Europe made at reasonable rates. Passage tickets by Steam or Sail Line to and from Great Britain and Continental Europe, for sale at New York prices. T.C. SHOVE Manitowoc, March 27, 1867 Manitowoc Pilot, Jan. 4, 1870


THEODORE C. SHOVE Referee's Sale. Circuit Court, County of Manitowoc.-George S. Glover against Willowby Liskum, Mary Liskum, Daniel D. Hammond, and Theodore C. Shove. Judgement of Foreclosure and Sale. IN virtue of, and pursuant to a judgement rendered in said court, in the above entilted action, dated the 31st day of October, 1859, I, Edgar D. Beardsley, Referee appointed in said judgment, shall expose for sale and sell at public auction, at the Court House in the village of Manitowoc, in the county of Manitowoc, on Wednesday, the 7th day of March, 1860, at the hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day, the following described mortgaged premises, or so much thereof as may be necessary to raise the amount of said judgment, interest and costs, together with the expense of sale.-All those certain pieces of parcels of land lying and being situate in the county of Manitowoc, and State of Wisconsin, and known and described as follows, to wit: The sourth west quarter of the north east quarter of section number twenty nine, (29) in town nineteen, (19) range twenty one (21) east, and the north west quarter of the north east quarter of section twenty nine, (29) in town nineteen, (19) range twenty, (21) east; also the east half of the north west quarter of section number thrityone, (31) town nineteen, (19) range twenty two, (22) east. Dated Manitowoc, November 26, 1859. E.D. Beardsley, Referee. Wm. M. Nichols, Plff's Att'y. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, December 2, 1859 P.3


GUS. SHUMAKER Gus. Shumaker, for a long time clerk, with merchants L.D. Dorschel & Bro. left here on Wednesday for Manitowoc, where he has secured a position with Merchant Torrison, of that city.-Chilton Times. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, March 9, 1886 P.3