NEWS FROM NEWSPAPERS [ SI ]

[ Home]


ANNIE SIBREE Miss Annie Sibree now a teacher in Peshtigo returned home for the holidays. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 23, 1884 P.3


DR. HY SIBREE Dr. Hy Sibree, son of our esteemed fellow citizen, H. Sibree, Esq., has been appointed school superintendent of Marinette county by the Governor. The position was not sought by him and was accepted with much reluctance, as he feared it would interfere with his large practice as a physician. The best wishes of his many friends here will be with him in the performance of his new and responsible duties. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


HENRY SIBREE Business card: HENRY SIBREE Justice of the Peace. Will make collections, pay taxes, search the records, draw deeds, mortgages, contracts, &c. All business entrusted to him will receive prompt attention, Office in Huebner's building, corner York and Eighth streets. Manitowoc Pilot, Jan. 4, 1870


M. SIBREE, MRS. Mrs. M. Sibree returned on Thursday from a protracted visit to her son Dr. Sibree at Sturgeon Bay. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 4, 1884 P.3


SARAH SIBREE "Home, Sweet Home." news: Miss Sarah Sibree has been teaching in Kewaunee county during the past year. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1 ******** Miss Sarah Sibree is passing her holidays at home. She is giving general satisfaction as teacher in the Squirrel district near the Branch. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


JOSEPH SIDOTY Two Rivers Section: PROPRIETOR SNOOZES, $15 IS TAKEN BY THIEF Business was quiet last evening at the Joseph Sidoty soft drink parlor, 1313 Madison street. The proprietor tilted back in his chair and dozed off. There was one customer in the place but he sauntered out. Then Mr. Sidoty roused himself and took a peek into the cash register. All the greenbacks were gone. He recalled that there had been a $5 bill and ten $1 bills, a total of $15. And they had disappeared. The proprietor called the police and they began an investigation. The thief had worked quietly and got away with the cash without arousing Sidoty. Manitowoc Herald News, Wednesday, July 18, 1928 Page 11


N. SIEBENHORN (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 30 Apr.) Last week Mr. N. Siebenhorn and his family went to Maribel where he will open a hardware store. 02 May 1907, Der Nord Westen


CHARLES SIEBENORN Mr. and Mrs. Charles Siebenorn have returned to Milwaukee after a brief visit at the home of Mrs. Siebtehorn's (sic) parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bode. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 29, 1916 P.3


WM. C. SIEKER Wm. C. Sieker, of this city, has just been elected a member of the Phi Beta Kappa society of the University of Wisconsin. Only persons who are distinguished for academic attainments are eligible for membership. Those chosen are regarded the best students that the University turns out. In a scholastic line the University can confer no greater honor than an election to the this classic organization. Among the member of the faculty in Phi Beta Kappa are Pres. Adams, Dean, Birge, Professors Haskins, Scott and Olin. June 5, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


WILLIAM SIEKER THREATENS A SUIT. William Sieker to Bring Action Against City if Streets Are Not Fixed. Residents and business people living on Park street are up in arms on account of that thoroughfare between Ninth and Tenth street. Imperfect drainage causes the water to stand in the street for a depth of six or seven inches and it thus remains well nigh impassible until the moisture is evaporated. At times a positive stench arises on account of the exisitng conditions and the unsanitary result, is a menace to good health. Complaint is made by William Sieker who threatens suit against the city if the matter is not attended to at once. It is said that a lowering of the grade at the corner of Ninth street will remedy the evil. Merchants allege that their trade is much impaired on account of the poor condition of the streets. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 30, 1904 P. 1


R.C. SIEVERT Mishicot news: R.C. Sievert is now riding a new three speed Indian twin. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 19, 1916 P.3


GEO. SILBERSACK, MRS. Town Two Rivers resident Mrs. Geo. Silbersack was trodden on by a cow she was milking last week and so severely injured that the outcome is uncertain. Several ribs were broken and she was generally seriously hurt. 24 May 1900, Der Nord Westen


DR. SIMON Dr. Simon, the "veteran" of our doctors, celebrated his 80th birthday yesterday in comparatively good health. Though he had been ill recently, he has recovered, and his many friends hope he has many more years. Since his daughter, Mrs. Dr. Luhmann and her husband, were observing their Silver Wedding Anniversary that same day, it was quite a family party. 29 Oct. 1903, Der Nord Westen


FRANK SIMON Frank Simon, son of the well known Dr. Simon, is enjoying life and making money as a druggist in Savannah, Ga. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


GEORGIANNE SIMON Miss Georgianne Simon has returned to her home at Milwaukee after and extended stay in the city with friends and relatives. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, March 14, 1916 P.3


HERMAN SIMON Herman Simon, who recently graduated from the Milwaukee Dental college, is in the city on a visit to relatives. Dr. Simon will leave for Chicago in a few days and will take a post graduate course, after which he will copy in this city. Apr. 13, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


LOUIS SIMON Coal Hole Catastrophe. The coal hole in F. Rudolph's sidewalk was left open last Friday night and proved a veritable "dead cave," to some of our peacable citizens. First in order came Uncle Wood. He was walking along leisurely, when his meditations were somewhat abruptly interrupted by a sudden descent, as it were. He saved himself from a complete tumble by getting hold of the sidewalk. Resting his elbows on the boards, while his body and feet were dangling beneath, he surveyed the surrounding scenery a while, and then by some unexplained gymnasic feat, got himself out of the blessed hole, with no further damages than a few slight brusies, though he claims "his back was nearly broken." Mr. Wood, in order save others from a similar accident, placed a dry good box over the aperture and then retired. A short time afterwards Mr. Louis Simon, on his way home, noticed this box, and thinking some boys had placed it there for hoax, determined to remove it by kicking. It was like killing two birds with one stone. The kick sent the box into the gutter and Mr. Simon into the basement below. He landed on a pile of kindling wood and empty oyster cans and was considerably bruised; so severe were his injuries, in fact, that it was some time before he was able to stand and walk home with the aid of a friend. Mr. Smallfeldt, the south side night watchman, was the next victim. He was seen on his beat about midnight, when suddenly he disappeared in the cavernous depths below. Smallfeldt was not seriously hurt, as he landed squarely on his feet. But the trouble he had was to get out of the basement. For about half an hour he groped his way under the sidewalk, trying to find some door or opening. He finally succeeded and before leaving that part of the city, took particular care to securely cover the hold. It is rumored that several of the boys met the same fate as the above, but they have kept quiet and not given themselves away. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


MRS. SIMON Mrs. Simon, the milliner, is having a new awning put in place. Vogelsang & Murphy furnished the awning. Mar. 23, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. JOSEPH SIMON Mrs. Joseph Simon and family departed for Milwaukee yesterday afternoon for a few days visit with friends and will probably make their home there. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 26, 1916 P.3


F. SIMONIS Mrs. F. Simonis of Two Rivers is spending a few days with her mother Mrs. Linstedt. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 4


DR. SIMONS Dr. Simons has changed his place of residence from the South to the North side and will soon be ready to receive calls at his new office on York Street. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


MRS. SIMONS Mrs. Simons' the milliner is in Chicago to select her stock for the spring trade. She is accompanied by her daughter, Miss Ella Simons. Feb. 18, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


S. SIMONSON Clark's Mills news: Mr. S. Simonson, of Door county, formerly a well known farmer of Liberty, visited friends here the past week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 1885 P.3


JOHN SIMS "Home, Sweet Home." news: John Sims is giving great satisfaction as teacher at the Rapids. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1 ******** The Rapids school John Sims, teacher, closed its winter term with an exhibition last Friday evening. This seems to have become a regular custom at the Rapids, and it is a good one, two (sic). Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


DOROTHEA SINGLEMANN MOTHER GETS PENSION OF $12 Mrs. Dorothea Singlemann Who Gave First Sacrifice to Philippines Twelve dollars per month is the pension which has been granted by the government to Mrs. Dorothea Singlemann, mother of Charles Singlemann, the first Manitowoc boy to give up his life in the Philippines while fighting with United States troops. Young Singlemann enlisted in Pennsylvania and was killed two years ago, the body being returned here for burial and the city honoring the memory with a military funeral. Mr. and Mrs. Singlemann are at present in Germany. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, February 20, 1902, Page 1


FRANK SINNOTT His three children died when his house burned near Kiel. 16 Aug 1860, Manitowoc Herald


MR. SIXTA Mr. Sixta has removed his entire stock of wines and liquors to the store formerly occupied by R. Adler, where he will carry on his wholesale and retail business until the completion of his new store. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), June 1, 1875 Manitowoc Business Notice


FRANK SIXTA FRANK SIXTA, AGED 8, SUFFERS FRACTURE OF ARM WHEN HE RUNS INTO AUTO WHILE PLAYING TAG Son of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Sixta Injured When He Collides With Auto Driven by Atty. A.L. Nash Last Night Playing tag on the street with a number of companions early last evening, Frank Sixta, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Sixta, St. Clair street, was seriously injured when he ran in the path of an automobile driven by Attorney A.L. Nash, struck the fender of the car, was thrown to the ground and severely bruised. The boys arm was fractured in two places by the force of the collision with the fender and he was bruised about the body. Mr. Nash's car was proceeding east while another car was on its way west. The Sixta lad dodged behind the west bound car and into the street in front of the Nash machine, which he collided with. Mr. Nash, whose machine was fortunately proceeding at a slow speed, stopped the car within six or seven feet and assisted in carrying the boy to his home where he was cared for by a physician who was summoned. It was found that the boy had sustained a double fracture of the arm and was bruised but not internally injured. The accident might have been a more serious one and is a warning to children not to play in the streets. The Sixta lad is reported resting easy today and will recover in a short time. Apr. 29, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRANK SIXTA Frank Sixta observed his 68th birthday Sun. with visits from his many friends. Regrettably, illness has him confined to his home. 04 May 1905, Der Nord Westen


DR. LOUIS SIRTA (SIXTA?) Dr. and Mrs. Louis Sirta, who were here over the holidays visiting with the Dr.'s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sirta, left Mon. to return to their home in Schuyler, Nebraska. 09 Jan. 1902, Der Nord Westen


DR. LOUIS SIXTA Dr. Louis Sixta and wife of Schuyler, Neb., are in the city for a few days to visit relatives and friends. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, August 4, 1904 P. 2


DR. LOUIS SIXTA Dr. Louis Sixta of Schuyler, Nebraska, a son of Frank Sixta here, is visiting here for several days. 11 Aug. 1904, Der Nord Westen


MATH SKARDA BLOOD VESSEL RUPTURED, FALLS FROM HIS WAGON Math Skarda, Teamster Meets With Peculiar Injury Math. Skarda, employed by Sam Hall as teamster, was peculiarly disabled this morning while about to go out on duty. While in the act of boarding his wagon he was suddenly stricken and it was found that blood vessels in one of his legs had been ruptured. He fell from the wagon. A physician was hurriedly summoned who pronounced the man's condition serious and ordered him removed to his home on Chicago street. July 09, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN SKARDA Kellnersville news: John Skarda left for Nebraska this morning. He intends to take up a farm in that state. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 12, 1885 P.4


MATTHIAS SKARDA (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 29 Oct.) Matthias Skarda of Manitowoc told your correspondent that on Sunday he attended the birthday party of Wm. Huebner. All the neighbors were also at the party and everyone enjoyed the food and drink. 01 Nov. 1906, Der Nord Westen


ANTON SKLADGE GIVE UP EFFORT TO REFORM BOY AFTER TWO YEARS TRY Anton Skladge, Two Rivers Lad of 14, Fails to "Make Good" on Probation and is Tent (sic) to Reform School Anton Skladge, a Two Rivers lad of 14 who has been under probation of municipal court for two years, and who is believed to have been the ringleader of a gang of youthful robbers who took $110 worth of manufactured products from the plant of the Standard Aluminum Co. plant on March 19 was yesterday committed to the state Industrial school at Waukesha. Three other boys, who confessed participation with Skladge, two 13 and one 11, the latter being a brother of Skladge, were released on probation by the court. Max. Lifchitz, a Two Rivers junk dealer who was arrested on the charge of receiving and secreting stolen goods in connection with the case, pleaded not guilty and was released under $200 bonds for hearing at the next session of the court at Two Rivers. It was alleged that Lifehitz purchased nine pounds of aluiminum ingots from the boys, valued at $5.40. Skladge, who is said by the authorities to have been implicated in other escapades and to have planned the robbery March 19, has been given every chance. The boys admitted that they had entered the Standard plant in February also. Most of the plunder secured by the boys, which included match boxes, ink stands, shaving cups and other manufactured articles, were recovered but in badly damaged condition it is said. The boys gained an entrance to the plant through a trap door and secreted the stolen goods under the warehouse. Mar. 28, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. ADOLPH SKARIVODA Brockville news: Misses Florence and Bernan Baugniet are staying with their aunt, Mrs. Adolph Skarivoda for a few weeks. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 18, 1916 P.5


JOS. SKLUTE Jos. Sklute is preparing to build a two story frame residence. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Feb. 2, 1899


JOS. SKLUTE Jac. Wachowitz and Mike Nitka were arrested by Constable Streich on a warrant sworn out by Jos. Sklute charging them with using abusive language. They were taken before Justice Craite and fined $3 and costs which they paid. Nov. 17, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPH SKLUTE SKLUTE LOSES CASE Jury Refuses to Hold Smazel For Assault Though the defendant virtually admitted that he had chastised the plaintiff, a jury in municipal court Saturday refused to hold Frank Smazel, the Clover dance hall man, for an alleged assault on Joseph Sklute and denied Sklute's claim of $200 for damages. The case occupied a day and one-half in hearing and was given to the jury late in the afternoon Saturday. After two hours, a verdict favoring the defense was brought in and Sklute was taxed for the costs of the case, having been brought in by the court to supply a bond to guarantee these before the hearing. Sklute has been in court with similar cases on several occasions of late and the jury evidently considered that he was little hurt. A jury of five heard the case. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, January 8, 1906 P.1


ALBERT SKOHRA Mr. and Mrs. Albert Skohra (sic) returned home last evening from their wedding trip. A reception was given at their home on Ninth St., in honor of their return. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, September 29, 1903 P. 2


FRANK SKORACKI Does Change of Man's Name Apply To Whole Family? Frank Joseph Skoracki, proprietor of the City Bakery, known all over the county, passed away yesterday at the register of deeds office and secured his burial at the nominal sum of $1, a funeral expense that no one should kick on in these days of high prices. No, Frank is not dead, in fact, he is more alive than ever but he has changed his name. Hereafter he is Mr. Frank Joseph Frieder and as Mr. Frieder he will continue his present business and his residence in this city. In citing the reasons for desiring a change Mr. Skoracki said he is fifty-five, was born in Germany, is married and has a family but owns no real estate and is desirous of changing his name to one of less foreign appearance. So hereafter if you go to the City Bakery and you want to talk to the proprietor you will have to ask for Mr. Frieder. What we wondered about was whether the change of the name would extend to Mrs. Skoracki or whether Mr. Frieder would live with Mrs. Skoracki and if it does change the name of the wife then how about the rest of the family. We tried to figure it all out and called up a couple of attorneys but they refused to give an off hand opinion. Anyway that's Mr. Frieder's trouble so why should we worry about it. Manitowoc Herald News, Wednesday, February 08, 1928, Page 2


JOSIE SKUBAL Joseph Woida is on trial in the municipal court this afternoon, to answer to a charge of assault with intent to do great bodily harm. Miss Josie Skubal is the complainant. It seems to be a case wherein the accused found that ardent affections were wholly unrequited and in his disappointed love he over-stepped the bounds of judicious conduct. The case is still in progress as we go to press. Oct. 19, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** In the trial of Joseph Woida in the municipal court yesterday afternoon the defendant was found guilty of simple assault. Several witnesses were examined, as were also the principals in the case and the weight of testimony did not sustain the charge of intent to do great bodily harm. But the evidence showed a clear case of assault and battery and Woida was given the option of paying $15 and costs or serving 30 days in jail. As the cost amounted to $27, he chose the time sentence and is now serving out his time. Oct. 21, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOS. SKWOR (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 26 July) Jos. Skwor celebrated his 38th birthday on Mon. in the company of many friends. 28 July 1904, Der Nord Westen


EMIL SLADKY Emil Sladky was up before Judge Craite to-day to answer to a complaint filed by Julius Pohl, charging the use of abusive language. Sladky was found guilty and assessed $3.00 and costs amounting in all to $7.95, which was paid. Oct. 25, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. SIMON SLADKY BROTHER KILLED IN WAR, MESSAGE TO LOCAL WOMAN OTTO MOLLY, BROTHER OF MRS. SIMON SLADKEY WOUNDED THREE TIMES, RETURNS TO FRONT AND TO HIS DEATH WIDOWED MOTHER, WHO GAVE THREE SONS, IS NOW ALONE After having been wounded and sent to the hospitals three times, only to recover and return to the front, Otto Molly, a brother of Mrs. Simon Sladky of this city, serving with the German army, was killed while fighting with his troop in Bohemia, according to messages received by Mrs. Sladky this week, from relatives in Germany. Mr. Molly was 35 years of age and is survived by a widow and two children, the youngest child having been born since Mr. Molly has been at the front. Mrs. Sladky, who came here from Germany three years ago to wed Mr. Sladky, has lost two brothers in the war and she is considerably worried over the fact that her widowed mother, residing in Germany, is now alone, the two brothers having been the last members of the family there. A year ago just before the outbreak of the war Mrs. Sladky made a trip to Germany for the purpose of having her mother accompany her to America to make her home here, but the aged woman declined to undertake the trip because of the loss of some time previously of the Titanic accident had made a great impression upon her of the danger of ocean travel. All pleadings of her daughter were in vain and Mrs. Sladky was finally forced to return alone. Mrs. Sladky's two brothers were among the first troops sent into the field by Germany and one of them met death in the early campaign of the army. The other, who has just been killed, was wounded and sent to the hospital three times but recovered each time and rejoined his regiment, meeting his death in a recent engagement of his troop with the enemy. Mrs. Sladky had written friends in Germany to keep her advised relative to her mother's health and her needs but at this time will not attempt to have her parent come here. Later she may return to Germany and try again to induce Mrs. Molly to return with her to make her home here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, Aug. 28, 1915, Page 1


WENZEL SLADKY TOOK A CLUB TO HIM. Wm. Lawrence Says Wenzel Sladky Assaulted Him. William Lawrence appeared in Municipal Court this morning and swore out a warrant for the arrest of Wenzel Sladky, on a charge of assault and battery. The case was adjourned one week. Late yesterday afternoon Lawrence came down Eight street in charge or (sic) Officer Royal Sniffins. He was bleeding profusely from wounds in the head and had evidently been roughly handled. It was thought by many that a knife had been used on the man and a rumor was soon current that he had been assaulted with an axe. He was not placed under arrest but taken to a doctor's office where his wounds were dressed and he was permitted to tell his story. It seems that he had trouble with Wenzel Sladky, who conducts a soloon (sic) on Chicago street, and alleges that Sladky assaulted him with a club, beating him about the head and body until forced to stop from sheer exhaustion. It was very apparent that something in the nature of a cyclone had struck him and from his battered appearance. Lawrence had been unable to stand against it. He says the assault was unwarranted and therefore filed a complaint against Sladky. The case will be watched with interest. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 1899 P.2


FRED SLEUNTZ Rapids news: Mr. Fred Sleuntz started his cheese factory this week. Fred is a good cheese maker and ought to be well patronized. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 12, 1885 P.4


FRED SLINTZ It is reported that our cheesemake, Fred Slintz has sold his factory to John Smith for $800. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 29, 1885 P.


CHAS. SLYKER Chas. Slyker, fireman on the Pere Marquette, indulged a little too freely in Manitowoc water, Saturday evening and becoming weary he forced an entrance into a vacant building in the second ward and laid himself down to sleep. Officers found him and landed him in jail where he remained over Sunday. When brought before Judge Craite yesterday he begged off and was allowed to depart in peace, on the promise to be more careful in the future. Apr. 18, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


C.A. SMALLEY C.A. Smalley, wife and family left to-day for Menominee where they will make their future home. Their many friends wish them success. Nov. 17, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


C.C. SMALLEY C.C. Smalley has finished an engine originally intended to be used on a pleasure yacht, but which he has now sold for $250. It is said to be a mechanical gem. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


CHARLEY SMALLEY Charley Smalley, son of C.C. Smalley, formerly employed by the Goodrich Co. (not foreman) has accepted a position at Marinette in a machine shop. His Many (sic) friends wish him success. Nov. 7, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CLARENCE SMALLEY Almost a fire - On Friday evening last, Mr. Clarence Smalley, on returning to his home about 10 o'clock, had to pass his father's office connected with the foundry and smelling a strong smoke near the vicinity, he rushed into the office and discovered the floor around the stove all a blaze and the room so full of smoke as to almost suffocate him. He immediately hastened for some water and finally succeeded in putting out the flames. It seems the stove was too near the floor, and becoming overly hot set the floor on fire. Five minutes later and the fire would have gained such headway that all efforts to save the office and foundry would, perhaps have proved futile. Feb. 17, 1870, Manitowoc Pilot


E.J. SMALLEY The well known writer, E.V. Smalley nephew of E.J. Smalley of this city has an article both instructive and entertaining in the January "Century." Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 23, 1884 P.3 ********** E.J. Smalley Esq. and bride arrived in this city Saturday and are receiving congratulations at the home of C.F. Smalley. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3 ********** October 15th,, 1885, in Paxton, Ill. by Dr. S.H. Bundy, E.J. Smalley Esq. of this city to Mrs. H.E. Harnit of Ludlow, Ill. Mr. Smalley has long been one of our leading and influential citizens. He is the senior partner in the enterprising firm known as the Smalley Manf. Co. and his genial nature and substantial business qualities have made him hosts of friends who will all wish him much joy in his new relation. Mrs. Smalley though a stranger here is winning golden opinions from all who meet her and will undoubtedly be a welcome addition to our social circles. Mr. Smalley has purchased the Olson property at the corner of 10th and Huron streets where they will soon establish their home. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 20, 1885 P.3


FANNIE AND MABLE SMALLEY The Misses Mable and Fannie Smalley departed for their new home at Sleepy Eye, Minn., yesterday. They carry with them the well wishes of countless friends and will be missed in the social circles of the city. June 29, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


H. SMALLEY On Mon. evening H. Smalley departed Manitowoc for his new home in Sleepy Eye, Minnesota. 01 June 1899, Der Nord Westen


H.D. SMALLEY H.D. Smalley is in quarantine at his home on Fourth street. A domestic in his household has the scarlet fever. All the children in the family have fled for refuge to other quarters. Feb. 3, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


H.D. SMALLEY TO LEAVE MANITOWOC. Ald. H.D. Smalley and Family Will Move to Sleepy Eye, Minn. This Month. Ald. H.D. Smalley and family are preparing to take up their residence in Sleepy Eye, Minn., where Mr. Smalley has purchased a hotel. For some time this step has been contemplated but the deal has only just been consummated. Mr. Smalley will manage the hotel personally and his many friends, while regretting the departure of this gentleman and his estimable family, will extend the best wishes for the future welfare. Mr. Smalley came to Manitowoc in 1856 and during the forty odd years of his residence here he has been a good citizen. As an alderman he has served his fellow citizens in a most efficient manner and his experience and genial countenance will be missed by the members of the council. He expects to leave with his family for their new home some time this month. May 11, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


H.D. SMALLEY Mr. and Mrs. H.D. Smalley took their department for Sleepy Eye, Minn., Monday night. Mr. Smalley will conduct a hotel at that place and many friends will wish him and his estimable wife prosperity in their new home. June 1, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HERSCHEL SMALLEY ACCIDENT.-Our apprentice, Herschel Smalley, had his arm borken on Sunday morning last, by having his horse fall upon him, while watering in the lake. Under the care of Dr. Preston, he is doing well, and we hope soon to see his good looking and kind face grace our sanctum, and prepared to call for "more copy." Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, Aug. 12, 1859 P.3


JOHN SMALLEY The home of Mr. and Mrs. John Smalley on North Fourth street, is brightened by the advent of a nine pound boy. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, December 28, 1903 P. 1


NED SMALLEY "Home, Sweet Home." news: Ned Smalley graduated from the Law Department of the University in 1875, then went went (sic) west to seek his fortune and now enjoys and excellent practice at Deadwood, D.T. His old friends will be glad to see him. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


P.J. SMALLEY P.J. Smalley is in the city visiting friends and relatives. He is now a thriving lawyer-editor of Caledonia, Minn. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2


MR. SMALLFELDT Coal Hole Catastrophe. The coal hole in F. Rudolph's sidewalk was left open last Friday night and proved a veritable "dead cave," to some of our peacable citizens. First in order came Uncle Wood. He was walking along leisurely, when his meditations were somewhat abruptly interrupted by a sudden descent, as it were. He saved himself from a complete tumble by getting hold of the sidewalk. Resting his elbows on the boards, while his body and feet were dangling beneath, he surveyed the surrounding scenery a while, and then by some unexplained gymnasic feat, got himself out of the blessed hole, with no further damages than a few slight brusies, though he claims "his back was nearly broken." Mr. Wood, in order save others from a similar accident, placed a dry good box over the aperture and then retired. A short time afterwards Mr. Louis Simon, on his way home, noticed this box, and thinking some boys had placed it there for hoax, determined to remove it by kicking. It was like killing two birds with one stone. The kick sent the box into the gutter and Mr. Simon into the basement below. He landed on a pile of kindling wood and empty oyster cans and was considerably bruised; so severe were his injuries, in fact, that it was some time before he was able to stand and walk home with the aid of a friend. Mr. Smallfeldt, the south side night watchman, was the next victim. He was seen on his beat about midnight, when suddenly he disappeared in the cavernous depths below. Smallfeldt was not seriously hurt, as he landed squarely on his feet. But the trouble he had was to get out of the basement. For about half an hour he groped his way under the sidewalk, trying to find some door or opening. He finally succeeded and before leaving that part of the city, took particular care to securely cover the hold. It is rumored that several of the boys met the same fate as the above, but they have kept quiet and not given themselves away. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


JUDGE SMART Judge Smart returned from a trip to the home of his youth on Thursday evening, looking as hale and hearty as ever. He reports having had a splendid time and no wonder; it must have done his heart good, to roam once more after many years of labor, among the scenes of his boyhood days. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 1


C.D. SMART Judge C.D. Smart and the editor of this paper celebrated their birthday anniversary on Christmas, and they would have exchanged congratulations with Assis't Supt. J.E. Langlois if he had been within hailing distance. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 30, 1884 P.4


R.D. SMART Mr. Joseph Rankin and R.D. Smart, of Manitowoc, were in town yesterday afternoon. They pretended to have come down here to get some fresh fish for breakfast, but the fact is they came here to see Johnnie Read off, as they failed to do it when he was in Manitowoc. Manitowoc County Chronicle (Two Rivers), May 11, 1875


FRANK SMAZEL SKLUTE LOSES CASE Jury Refuses to Hold Smazel For Assault Though the defendant virtually admitted that he had chastised the plaintiff, a jury in municipal court Saturday refused to hold Frank Smazel, the Clover dance hall man, for an alleged assault on Joseph Sklute and denied Sklute's claim of $200 for damages. The case occupied a day and one-half in hearing and was given to the jury late in the afternoon Saturday. After two hours, a verdict favoring the defense was brought in and Sklute was taxed for the costs of the case, having been brought in by the court to supply a bond to guarantee these before the hearing. Sklute has been in court with similar cases on several occasions of late and the jury evidently considered that he was little hurt. A jury of five heard the case. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, January 8, 1906 P.1


LIEUT. COL. SMEDLEY It may interest some of our comrades in this county who served in the 32nd Wis. to know that Lieut. Col. Smedley of that Reg. now resides at Milbank, Dak. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4


A.D. SMITH NOTICE. All persons who are indebted to me are requested to pay their indebtedness within a week after the date of this notice, and all persons having claims against me will please present the same at once for adjustment and settlement, as I have retired from the management of the Williams House, having disposed of my interest therein to A.D. Johnston who will conduct the same hereafter. A.D. Smith. Manitowoc, Nov. 17th. 1884. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1884 P.3


A.R. SMITH A.R. Smith and Ira Smith, of St. Louis, are home on their annual summer vacation. Manitowoc Tribune, July 19, 1877


ALDRICH SMITH We neglected to state last week that a portion of the pier belonging to Messrss. (sic) Aldrich Smith & Co. of Two Rivers was destroyed during the severe gale of the week previous. A small quantity of lumber was also carried away. This noble pier has weathered many a storm without injury save from those of more than ordinary violence. Feb. 7, 1855 P. 3, Manitowoc Tribune


ANDREW SMITH Two Rivers news: Mr. Andrew Smith and wife have moved to our city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 12, 1886 P.2


AVE SMITH (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Burmeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


CHARLES SMITH Charles Smith and family have arrived here from Cuba to visit Mr. Smith's mother, Mrs. Hiram Smith. They may decide to remain here. Mr. Smith, who was formerly attached to the U.S. marine corps in Cuba has lately been engaged in the fruit business there but the war has taken many boats away from the service and crippled shipping facilities and he decided to return to the states. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are parents of a two months old child having been born in Cuba. July 06, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. E.R. SMITH Mrs. E.R. Smith goes this week to Cardillac, (sic) Mich. where she will make her home with her son. The Smith homestead is unoccupied for the present no buyer having yet appeared. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 14, 1886 P.1


E.R. SMITH Mr. Albert E. Smith of Cadillac, Mich. has been visiting his parents Mr. and Mr. E.R. Smith for a few days, and returned home to-day. Miss Jenna A. Smith accompanied him as far as Chicago. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2 *********** E.R. Smith is ill at his home on St. Claire street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 4


E.R. SMITH, MRS. ACCIDENT.-We learn that a serious accident occurred on board the Steamer Huron, on her last trip.A young man named Andrew Westbrook, brother of Mrs. E.R. Smith, of this village, fell through an open coal-scuttle, and was so badly injured that his life is depaired of. He was brought to this place by the Queen City, and is now lying in a precarious condition. Nov. 22, 1855, Manitowoc Tribune


GEORGE SMITH Gibson news: George Smith and family formrely (sic) of this palce have gone to Texas, intending to make it their future home. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, December 8, 1885 P.4


H.H. SMITH (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Bormeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


HIRAM SMITH Hiram Smith and wife, of California, are visiting P.P. Smith. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


IRA SMITH A.R. Smith and Ira Smith, of St. Louis, are home on their annual summer vacation. Manitowoc Tribune, July 19, 1877


IRA SMITH Three new diphtheria cases were reported from our city's West Side on Friday- in the families of 21st Street resident Robert Murphy, 19th Street resident D. Miller, and in yet another family. Also, a fourth child in the Jagodinski family is severely stricken with the disease. The disease also exists in the A. Tatek and Ira Smith families on Chicago Street, and in the Schroeder family on the North Side. So far Health Officer Dr. Meany does not fear an epidemic. 22 Oct. 1908, Der Nord Westen


JOHN SMITH John was working in the Durgin & Co. Mill when he broke his foot which got caught in a wheel. 03 Feb 1855, Manitowoc Herald


JOHN SMITH It is reported that our cheesemake, Fred Slintz has sold his factory to John Smith for $800. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 29, 1885 P.3


JOHN SMITH The $50 reward money for finding the body of Edward J. Morgan was awarded Saturday to Charles M. Downer and John Smith. 22 Mar. 1906, Der Nord Westen


JOHN SMITH A fine large Bear was killed on Thursday last by John Reynolds & John Smith of the town of Kossuth. The meat when dressed weighted 166 lbs and the skin was brought to town sold to a gentleman for $5. Quite a number have been killed during the past season, and hunters have had rare sport. Dec. 20, 1855, Manitowoc Tribune


JOHN A. SMITH John A. Smith, traveling agent for the Singer Sewing Machine Co., is spending a short vacation in the city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 1


MIKE SMITH A few Nimrods of this place went up to Gibson lately, where they were joined by Mike Smith, to hunt the savage coon. They spent a very pleasant evening and brought home a number of coons. Isaac Craite has great faith in the medicinal properties of coon oil, and he anoints himself from head to foot several times a year with this fragrant grease. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), July, 1888


P.P. SMITH (NOTE: I have put the list in alphabetical order with surnames first to facilitate finding a certain surname) Old Settlers Club. At a meeting held pursuant to a notice published in the Manitowoc Pilot, Manitowoc County Chronicle, and the Nord-Western, at the Windiate House in the city of Manitowoc, on the 16th day of January A. D. 1879, for the purpose of organizing an Old Settlers Club, P. P. Smith was chosen chairman of the meeting and William Bach Secretary. Mr. Markham addressed the meeting and stated the object. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to appoint a committee of three, to draft a Constitution and By-Laws for said club and to confer with the commitee, appointed by a meeting held at Klingholtz hall, January 4th, for the same purpose, for consolidation both clubs. H. H. Smith, W. W. Waldo, and William Bach were appointed as such committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to consider all present members of the club, and to instruct the Secretary to take their names down with date and year of arrival in this country. The following are the names and dates as recorded by the Secretary: Anderson, James S. - 1852 Bach, Wm. - April 1848 Bock, Chas. - June 1852 Bormeister, W. - May 1844 Cooper, Geo. - May 1855 Edwards, Henry - 1837 Fellows, M. - Sept. 1848 Hall, John - March 1851 Hall, Sam. - 1851 Hubbard, H. - April 1837 Jones, A. D. - June 1837 Klingholz, R. - July 1847 Kostomlastky, F. - July 1857 Lennox, Jos. - 1839 Markham, J. D. - May 1856 Miller, J. - 1856 Mulholland, H. - 1852 Mulholland, P. - May 1850 Noble, W. H. - May 1855 O'Shea, P. - 1853 Patterson, James - Aug. 1848 Ross, Norris - 1841 Seeger, L. - May 1850 Sherman, E. - Spring 1850 Smith, Ave - April 1844 Trummel, F. - May 1844 Tyler, M. - July 1854 Waldo, W. W. - May 1850 White, Chr. W. - 1852 Windiate, Thos. - Nov 1854 Wood, S. A. - Oct. 1849 On motion of J. D. Markham it was resolved to appoint a committee of arrangements and to have a social of the 21st day of February next, the following were so appointed: H. H. Smith, Chas. Esslinger, A. Wittmann, Lyman Emerson, H. S. Pierpont, H. Edwards. On motion of Chas. W. White it was resolved to meet again on the 15th day of Feb. next at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place to hear the reports of committee. On motion of J. S. Anderson it was resolved to instruct the Secretary of the meeting to publish the proceedings in the newspapers of the County. On motion of J. D. Markham the meeting adjourned till the 15th day of Feb., 1879 at 7 o'clock P. M. at the same place. William Bach, Secretary Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), Jan. 21, 1879


MR. & MRS. P.P. SMITH Alonzo Smith, of St. Louis, Mo., and Ira Smith, of San Francisco, Cal., are here for a visit with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. P.P. Smith. Both are Manitowoc boys whose success in life is gratifying to a large circle of friends of their boyhood days. They will remain for several days and are being warmly welcomed. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, April 14, 1903 P. 1


PERRY SMITH Perry Smith has been improving his home and grounds. He has always had the name of having one of the neatest places in Manitowoc and don't intend to lose it. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 21, 1885 P.3


PERRY SMITH It has been generally known by everyone that Mr. Perry Smith, an old resident of our city, had always been sight impaired and then 7 years ago became totally blind. Since that time he has not sought any medical help because the specialists at that time told him nothing could be done. On Wed. morning last week as he left his storehouse, it seemed to him that the darkness was less intense. As he sat at breakfast he was able to see the porcelain crock on the table. Since then his sight, which was lost for so long, has wondrously returned to some degree. Although he cannot drive a nail he can discern almost everything, and he is quite pleased with it after so many years of deep darkness. We hope for him that this improvement endures. 13 July 1899, Der Nord Westen


S.G. SMITH Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Smith of Waukesha, are visitng in the city, the guests of her parents Mr. and Mrs Bernhard Rhode. Nov. 25, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


SYLVESTER B. SMITH (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 16 Dec.) Sylvester B. Smith, who has lived here for the past few years, has bought a farm in Montague, Michigan, and will move there with his family on Wednesday. 19 Dec. 1907, Der Nord Westen


S.W. SMITH Capt. S.W. Smith the pioneer editor of this city so well known to old residents has been elected Mayor of Warsaw, Mo. his present home by an almost unanimous vote. The Capt. seems to have gained the good will of the people there regardless of party. May he live long and continue to prosper. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 13, 1886 P.2


W.H. SMITH Two Rivers news: We understand W.H. Smith, who has been superintendent of Hintze's sash door and blind factory at this place for a few years has been given the superintendency of the firm's shop in Chicago. J. Delille and O. Nelson have been giving Mr. Smith's position here. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 28, 1885 P.2


MR. SMOTZ Branch news: The Branch has enjoyed a boom in the barn-raising business. Messrs. Schneider, Mausnest, Lorenzon, Smotz and Voelker raised large barns on their farms, and Messrs. Squirrel and Eatough raised horse barns, all within two weeks. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 29, 1883 P.4


FRANK SMUGGLER, MRS. Mrs. Frank Smuggler and sons, Raymond and Mare, left for Milwaukee yesterday and today will attend the ceremonies at which Mrs. Smuggler's daughter, Miss Clara, will receive the veil in the Felician order of Catholic sisterhood. July 20, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


BERLIN SNIFTIN Berlin Sniftin, who has been down with the fever is improving. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


JOSEPH SNYDER Joseph Snyder is home to spend Sunday. Mr. Snyder is traveling representative of the Sheboygan Chair Co. Apr. 15, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. SOENKSEN Branch news: Mrs. Soenksen of Mishicott, is vising with her mother, Mrs. C. Herrman for a few days. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 29, 1885 P.3


MRS. R. SOENKSEN Branch news: Mrs. R. Soenksen, of Mishicott, is the guest of her mother, Mrs. P. Herrmann, this week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 1, 1886 P.1


B. SOENKSEN Mishicot News: Mr. Peter Rau has pruchased the Lake House in Two Rivers, formerly owned by Mrs. J.C. Bohn and will remove there soon. He has sold his village property, including water-power, to B. Soenksen. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 10, 1882 P. 4


BOY SOENKSEN Last week 3 gentlemen, whose combined years total 246, paid a visit to Wm. Zander in Eastwin. They are Louis Zander and Boy Soenksen of Mishicott, and L. Heyroth of Manitowoc, each of whom is 82 yrs. old, still active and healthy. 16 Nov. 1905, Der Nord Westen


ARTHUR SOENTJEN (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 24 Dec.) Mr. and Mrs. B. Soentjen traveled to Chicago Sat. to spend several months with their son Arthur Soentjen. 02 Jan. 1902, Der Nord Westen


E. SOGGE E. Sogge, a former Two Rivers man, now located at Kewaunee, who recently purchased the Dick Bishop dance hall and saloon on the Shoto road, will take possession of the place Friday. It is said the consideration was $7,000. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, March 8, 1916 P.3


GEORGE SOGGE Capt. George Sogge of Two Rivers Coast guard station has received orders to open the station March 1. This is the same date as last year's opening. It is expected that the same crew as last year will be at the Two Rivers station. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, February 28, 1916 P.3


F. SOLOMON Mr. and Mrs. F. Solomon celebrated their Silver wedding on Tuesday evening. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 15, 1885 P.4


BOY SONGSEN (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 16 May) Mr. Boy Songsen, despite his 82 years is still remarkably healthy. We encountered him yesterday as he was working in his garden. 17 May 1906, Der Nord Westen (NOTE: This is probably Boie Soenksen)


AUGUST SONNTAG (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 09 Jan.) Our beloved innkeeper August Sonntag celebrated his 30th birthday on Fri. The National Band, to which he belongs, played for the party. 12 Jan. 1899, Der Nord Westen ******* (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 07 Jan.) August Sonntag celebrated his 32nd birthday on Sun. 10 Jan. 1901, Der Nord Westen


FRED SORGE Fred Sorge, the hustling agent for the New Era Gas Engine, has recently placed a five horse power engine for Nick Blau in his elevator at Brillion. A 7 1/2 horse power engine has also been purchased by Ed Wenndorf of this city. He will use the machine for wood cutting purposes. Feb. 11, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. FRANK SOSONOSKY Youth Visits With His Grandmother, "Missing" Excitement reigned at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Endries, South Fourteenth street, early this afternoon when Mrs. Endries discovered that 4-year-old Allen was missing. Fear for his safety was soon relieved when a telephone call from Two Rivers informed her that the young lad was safe at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Frank Sosonosky, there. He had taken the bus to Two Rivers, believing that he would enjoy a visit of several days there. Manitowoc Herald Times, Tuesday, June 28, 1932 P.1


MR. SOUZIAN Miss Alvena Sauville of this city and a Mr. Souzian of Gibson were married at the Catholic Church, at this place on Monday a week ago. The wedding festivities took place in Voshardts Hall in the evening. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 11, 1882 P. 4


JOSEPH SPAET Sad Accident.- A little girl, aged two years, daughter of Mr. Joseph Spaet, of the town of Newton, was playing with a little brother of three years, on Monday of this week, the latter having an axe in his hand. While thus engaged, he accidentally struck his sister's right hand, and nearly severed it from the wrist-cutting it through from the thumb to the little finger-leaving it hanging. The little sufferer was brought to town immediately, and placed under the care of Dr. Schencke, an experienced surgeon, who has hopes of curing the wound. The Manitowoc Pilot, Apr. 26, 1861


EARL SPAETH Calls The Coast Guard To Halt Boys In Boat Wilbur Thompson and Earl Spaeth, both 13, were on a little hiking trip to Two Rivers Saturday afternoon. They were proceeding along the beach and when a little more than half way the trip became wearysome. They spied a small skiff drawn on the shore with oars handy. It belonged to Frank Gauthier, of the Moonlight Inn. The pair shoved off and headed for the Two Rivers piers. But Mr. Gauthier scanning the horizon with his trusty binoculars spied the boys but was more concerned about his boat. He telephoned the coast guard at Two Rivers. Capt Staal and his men responded and soon came up with the boys. The boat was returned to its resting place on the beach. Gauthier gave the boys a lecture on the benefits of walking and the boys were sent back to their homes here with orders to finish their hikes on foot in the future. Manitowoc Herald News, Monday, April 14, 1930 P.13


FRANK SPAGNUOLO Frank Spagnuolo, who ran a bakery on N. 8th St., has given up the business and will relocate to Grand Haven, Michigan. 17 Sep. 1903, Der Nord Westen


MR. SPECHT Mishicott news: With the aid of friends Mr. Specht celebrated the forty-seventh anniversary of his birthday, on Friday last. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4


MR. A. SPECHT (From the correspondent in Mishicott, 26 Feb.) On Sunday Mr. A. Specht observed his 65th birthday. 28 Feb. 1901, Der Nord Westen


F. SPEERING (SON) TWO RIVERS BABE SCALLED(sic) BUT WILL LIVE Little Son of F. Speering Falls into Tub Hot Water The two year old child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Speering of Two Rivers, was severely scalded when a tub of hot water was overturned onto the body of the babe while the child was playing about the house. Though the child's body from the breast down was severely burned, the little one will survive, say physicians. The mother had placed a tub with hot water on a chair that was turned down on its front side intending to add cold water at once. Before she could do so the child took hold of the chair back and pulled it down spilling the hot water over its body. Sept. 03, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HENRY SPENCER Kossuth news: Mr. and Mrs. Henry Spencer after several weeks absence, visiting relatives in Sturgeon Bay and Ahnapee are back at the old homestead. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 13, 1886 P.2


LOUISE SPIERING Miss Louise Spiering left for Fargo, N.D., this mornng, where she will spend three months visiting relatives and friends. June 6, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. SPINDLER Mr. Spindler, of the well known firm of Barnard Spindler, & Co., Type Founders, Chicago, will spend his vaction, a full years, in our city. He has just returned from a visit to Germany, and brought with him a young and charming wife, who, his friends predict will be "the joy of his life." The City Band serenaded him on his arrival Saturday night. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


CARL SPINDLER Carl Spindler celebrated his 53rd birthday on Tuesday. 27 June 1895, Der Nord Westen


CHARLES SPINDLER Charles Spindler and son, Edward, departed for Milwaukee today where they will get Mr. Spindler's new Packard twin six and will drive it up here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 19, 1916 P.2


CHARLES E. SPINDLER Celebrated his 53rd birthday on Thurs. with friends 02 July 1896, Der Nord Westen


JOHN SPINDLER JUDGE LYNCH AFTER HIM Prisoner Brought Here Today Narrowly Escaped Vengeance of Villagers KIEL POSSE ON HIS TRACK Sheboygan Man Held in $1000 to Answer Charge of Heinous Crime at Kiel-8 Year Old Girl Victim After narrowly escaping the vengeance of a posse of incensed villagers at Kiel who pursued him for miles with intent to mete out justice according to the laws of Judge Lynch, John Spindler, Jr., a Sheboygan man, was brought here Thursday in charge of Deputy Sheriff C. R. Zorn of Schleswig, and arraigned in Municipal Court to answer to the charge of a heinous crime-that of assault, the victim being an eight year old girl. Little Anita Voland, the eight year old daughter of Alfred Voland, a prominent resident of Kiel, is the victim of the crime alleged against Spindler and the condition of the child is precarious. Wednesday afternoon, accompanied by her sister, six years old, the child was returning home on the road between Wilhelm and Kiel when accosted. The older girl was treated in shameful a manner and terribly abused by the assailant, reaching home in a pitiable condition. Physicians attending the child report her injuries are serious. A posse was organized and armed and search immediately instituted for the miscreant, a good description of the assailant having been given by the younger child. Spindler was found in hiding by Deputy Sheriff Zorn, who, recognizing the danger to the prisoner in event of his falling into the hands of the villagers, made his escape and started for the city. Spindler was taken late Wednesday evening and offered no resistance. Spindler is the son of a well-to-do farmer of Sheboygan county near the Manitowoc county line. He is 21 years of age and has heretofore borne a good reputation. The preliminary hearing in the case has been continued until June 26, the prisoner furnishing bonds in the amount of $1000. It is expected that the victim of the assault will then be able to be in court to identify the defendant. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, June 20, 1902, Page 1


WM. SPINKE Wm. Spinke, while out driving Sunday night was thrown from the carriage by a sudden lurch and was quite severely injured. He has an ugly cut on his forehead and one of his eyes is injured slightly. Oct. 25, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. SPOENTGEN (DAUGHTER) On Sunday the 3-year old daughter of Mr. Spoentgen fell 20 feet from a balcony of their residence onto a cement walk. She broke an arm, lost 3 teeth, and suffered various scrapes. It is a wonder she escaped with her life. 18 June 1908, Der Nord Westen


MINNIE SPOENTGEN Long article May 12, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


EDWARD SPORER 13 YEAR OLD LAD PROVES HERO AS HE RESCUES TWO EDWARD SPORER SHOWS RARE PRESENCE OF MIND AND SAVES LIVES OF TWO SMALL TOTS ON THE RIVER The presence of mind of 13-year-old Edward Sporer, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Sporer, N. Tenth street, saved two children from probable death in the river yesterday when the tots while playing in a boat moored at the river bank released the craft and were carried adrift. Young Sporer, hearing the cries of the children, Melvin Orth, aged six, and Lester, five, hurried to the rescue. The two children had been playing about a boat on the bank and thought it would be great sport to get into the river and pushed the boat off, having provided themselves with sticks for paddles. There was a rope in the boat and to this fact and Sporer's presence of mind, the youngsters probably owe their lives When a distance from the shore the children became frightened and cried for help, Sporer, who lives near, heard the cries and rushing in the river directed the older boy to throw out the rope which Sporer proceeded in getting hold of and pulled the boat to shore. The boat had partially filled with water and ? would probably have cost the children their lives. The Sporer lad assisted the children from the boat and took them to their home at 410 N. Tenth street. The lad is a modest little ? and showed rare presence of mind for someone so young and is (illegible). July 17, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


AMBROS SPRANG (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 28 Aug.) Mr. and Mrs. Ambros Sprang of Milwaukee are here this week visiting Mr. Sprang's parents and sisters. 30 Aug. 1906, Der Nord Westen


MR. SQUIRREL Branch news: The Branch has enjoyed a boom in the barn-raising business. Messrs. Schneider, Mausnest, Lorenzon, Smotz and Voelker raised large barns on their farms, and Messrs. Squirrel and Eatough raised horse barns, all within two weeks. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 29, 1883 P.4


MR. SQUIRREL Branch news: Mr. Squirrel, father of J. Squirrel, celebrated his eightieth birthday a few days ago by inviting in a few of his friends. 18 Sep. 1883, Lakeshore Times


MRS. SQUIRREL Mrs. Squirrel started Thursday on a visit to her daughter, who lives in Iowa. Sep. 18, 1883, Lakeshore Times


HENRY STADLER Two Rivers news: Henry Stadler, of Neshoto joined the army of Benedicts during the first week. One of the belles of Chicago is the fair one who has succeeded in making a conquest of the affections of a young man, who has long been considered proof against the attacks of the wily Cupid. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 4


CHAS. H. STADDLER Chas. H. Staddler, a mason contractor of Chicago, is in the city visiting his brother. Jan. 23, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRANK STADEK Fred Haseloff, who stole a bicycle from Frank Stadek last October and who pleaded guilty to the charge in Municipal court Tuesday afternoon, yesterday paid his fine and costs, amounting to $32.22. The alternative was 90 days in jail and decided that the weather was too fine, and the amount of the fine too small, to induce him to languish in "durance vile" for three months. Apr. 20, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


BERTHA STAHL Miss Bertha Stahl, of Milwaukee is here for a visit at the home of her brother, Charles Stahl, Division street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 27, 1916 P.3


MRS. CHARLES STAHL Mrs. Charles Stahl has returned from Ironwood where she was called by the death of her brother. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, February 26, 1916 P.3


A.C. STAHL Corp. A.C. Stahl, of Co. H., who was left in the hospital at Porto Rico when the regiment started north, is once more among the boys. He returned home y esterday afternoon. Oct. 19, 1898, Manitowoc Daily Herald


GEORGE STAHL George Stahl of Cumberland, is here for a visit, a guest of George Groffman, for a few days. Mr. Stahl, who is a successful business man at Cumberland, engaged in the real estate business, was formerly a resident of Manitowoc but this is his first visit to the city in thirty or more years. Mr. Stahl was impressed by the changes in the city and the evidence of advancement here. Mar. 22, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


LIEUT. STAHL Blind Pickerel Takes Refuge in Henry Nienaber's Rubber Boot Lieut. Stahl and Henry Nienaber went fishing yesterday at Hines. They succeeded in capturing a few nice specimens and Mr. Nienaber is credited with a novel experience. Blind pickerel are scarce but they do exist. Mr. Nienaber hooked a pickerel but he couldn't land him. He had on high rubber boots, (we mean Henry, not the pickerel) so he waded in after him. The water was deep and went over the tops of the boots. The fish swam into one of the boots and the captor waded out triumphantly. The pickerel weighed only a pound and it is needless to say was stone blind. This is not a fish story. Manitowoc Daily Herald, May 15, 1899 p.4


FRANK STANGEL Two Creeks News: Mathias Hallada, of the town of Mishicott, sold his farm of eighty acres to Frank Stagel, for $2,950 the other day. He then immediately bought Chas. Wagner's hotel and farm near Tisch Mills, for $4,000. Wagner intends to remove to Milwaukee. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 31, 1882 P. 4


FRANK STANGEL (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 14 May) Frank Stangel of Peoria, visited here last week with local relatives - Frank Hascheck and Joseph Dolesch. Mr. Stangel is a Bohemian by birth. 17 May 1906, Der Nord Westen


J. STANGEL Tisch Mills news: Several new automobiles have been sold to a number of the farmers in our vicinity. Messrs. E. Kerch, J. Stangel and W.I. Stangel purchased Oakland cars. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 22, 1916 P.4


J.J. STANGEL J.J. Stangel asked the council to refund him $17.54 taxes paid under protest on an automobile assessed to him and which he says he did not own, May 1. He says that tax was assessed to the dealer also. The machine is assessed at $900. Feb. 8, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOSEPH W. STANGEL (DAUGHTER) The youngest daughter of Joseph W. Stangel in Tisch Mills recently fell from a swing and injured her legs so badly that the doctors fear an amputation may be necessary. 15 Oct. 1903, Der Nord Westen (NOTE: Possibly Emma who was 8 yrs. on the 1900 Mishicot census)


PAUL STANGEL FIND HEART OF KELLNERSVILLE MAN, WRONG SIDE Despite This Fact it is Said Man Was Passed By 2 Rivers Board Paul Stangel, a Kellnersville man, registered for the conscription army, examined by the board in Dist. 2 at Two Rivers, was found to be physically fit for service notwithstanding that physicians reported that Stangel's heart was misplaced, being on the right side of the body instead of the left. The young man, however, was robust and the organ performed its normal functions despite the fact of the unusual location and physicians said that they would pass Stangel. There have been several cases of this kind reported as result of the examinations in the country, although they are not frequent. Aug. 16, 1917, Manitowoc Daily Herald


W.I. STANGEL Tisch Mills news: Several new automobiles have been sold to a number of the farmers in our vicinity. Messrs. E. Kerch, J. Stangel and W.I. Stangel purchased Oakland cars. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 22, 1916 P.4


JOSEPH STANGL Joseph Stangl of Two Creeks, who sold his farm last spring, has bought 195 acres of land for $15,000 in Willamette Valley, Oregon, and his family left for there on Tuesday. 04 Aug. 1904, Der Nord Westen


MRS. STAUCH Rapids news: Mrs. Stauch, who sold her place some time since has bought a residence in Manitowoc, on the North Side. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, April 28, 1885 P.3


G.W. STAUDINGER G.W. Staudinger, formerly a resident of Clarks Mills, has now located in Casa Grande, Ariz., and writes the Herald a letter in which he says he likes the country and will make his permanent home there. Incidently Mr. Staudinger says he must keep in touch with his old home and has ordered the paper sent to him there. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 21, 1916 P.8


GRETCHEN STAUDT Dr. and Mrs. J.A. Spalsbury of Sturgeon Bay, the latter formerly Miss Gretchen Staudt of this city, have adopted a baby boy at Milwaukee, according to the Door County News. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, March 9, 1916 P.3


JOHN STAUDT Mr. John Staudt was driving by with his wife and child in the wagon the horses took fright sheered to one side, ran the wagon over a log and threw the occupants into the mud one of the wheels passing over Mrs. Saudt and her child. Fortunately the wagon was a light one and the injuries inflicted were slight. Apr. 15, 1884, Lakeshore Times


MRS. J.A. STAUDT Walter Staudt has returned to Milwaukee after a short stay in the city with his mother, Mrs. J.A. Staudt. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 5, 1916 P.3


JOHN STAUDT John Staudt celebrated his 42nd birthday on Fri. last week with friends. 16 Sept. 1897, Der Nord Westen


LESTER STAUDT LOCAL BOY TO APPEAR IN OPERA, DETROIT & CHICAGO LESTER STAUDT, OF THIS CITY TO TAKE PART IN PRODUCTION BY UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENTS (Special to the Herald.) ANN ARBOR, Mich., Jan. 17. - Lester C. Staudt of Manitowoc, who is a student of the University of Michigan this winter, has just been chosen for the cast of the Michigan Union opera which will be staged here in the middle of March. The Michigan Union is the organization of all the men on the campus, and the Union Opera, given exclusively by the members of the Union, in which they take the roles of dancing chorus girls, is the greatest annual student dramatic production of the years. A week or so after the presentation here it will be staged in Chicago, Detroit, Saginaw, Toledo, and possibly other cities. The name of the opera has not yet been made public. Mr. Staudt is a son of Mrs. ?. Staudt of this city and has been a student at the University of Michigan for two years. He has taken an active part in activities of the university and is one of the popular students at the Michigan school. He attended the local schools. It is probable that John Staudt, brother of Mr. Staudt, will journey to Chicago to witness the production of the opera in that city when it is produced, probably early in April. Jan. 17, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


M.P. STAUDT M. P. Staudt observed his 25th birthday yesterday. 05 Aug. 1897, Der Nord Westen


MRS. WILLIAM ST. CLAIRE Timely Arrival of Husband Prevents Death ESCAPING GAS NEARLY CAUSES WOMAN'S DEATH Mrs. William St. Claire Found on Floor Unconscious By Husband, Resuscitated Escaping gas nearly took the life of Mrs. William St. Claire, Twenty-seventh and Wollmer streets, Saturday night, the return of her husband shortly after ? o'clock and his discovery of her unconscious form alone preventing death. Mrs. St. Claire is at her home today, apparently little the worse for her experience following treatment at her home and at the hospital. Artificial respiration was used for an hour and a half before Mrs. St. Claire could be revived by Dr. Donahue who was called to the scene. The police ambulance and the pulmotor were also called for but the city equipment was not used. Mrs. St. Claire was found lying on the first floor of the home where she had succumbed. Her husband immediately summoned help when he discovered her but it took considerable time before she could be revived sufficiently to be taken to the hospital. She was able to return to her home yesterday. All the burners on her gas stove were turned off, according to the attending physician who said it was believed the gas came from other sources. Manitowoc Herald News, Monday, September 17, 1928 Page 2


MRS. STEBBINS Mrs. B.H. Healy is in the city from Kenosha for a visit with her sister, Mrs. Stebbins. Mrs. Healy is interested in the Vaudette motion picture house and will remain here for several days. Feb. 11, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald ******** Mrs. B.H. Healy has returned to her home at Kenosha after a visit in the city with her sister, Mrs. C.J. Stebbins. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, March 7, 1916 P.3


H. STECHMESSER LEG SHOT AWAY Gun Falls From Wall and discharge Cripples Well Known Farmer. Herman Stechmesser, a farmer residing on the Range Line road five miles north of Two Rivers, had the lower portion of his left leg shot off Wednesday by the discharge of a shot gun which fell from a hook on the wall and was exploded. The gun, a muzzle loader, had not been used for several months and the charge had not been removed. The gun was dislodged from its place on wall and fell to the floor, being discharged, the entire contents entering Stechmesser's leg and almost completely severing it. Amputation was had and it is not thought that the accident will have any more result. Stechmesser is one of the well known farmers of the county, married and has a family. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, January 15, 1903 P. 1


H. STECHMESSER (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 13 June) H. Stechmesser, a farmer in this vicinity, was in Two Rivers today on a visit. Some years ago Mr. Stechmesser was taking a loaded gun from the wall when it fell to the floor, went off and hit him in the leg, which had to be amputated. Since then he has worn a wooden leg, but next week he will go to Milwaukee to try a rubber leg for a while. Today Mr. Stechmesser was visiting Theodor Stollberg, shopping for farm machinery. 16 June 1904, Der Nord Westen


HENRY STEDJE TWO MANITOWOC CO. BOYS IN CASUALTY LISTS TODAY; BOTH AS SEVERELY WOUNDED Names of two more Manitowoc county boys are given in the casualty lists released by the war department today, both men being listed as "wounded severely." Arthur Bolzenthal, who was sent to Camp Custer from Two Rivers, having made his home there at the time of his call to service is one of the men and Henry Stedje, of Grimms is the second. Both men were members of the national army before they crossed seas. Relatives were notified by telegraph of the wounding of the two boys. Dec. 17, 1918, Manitowoc Herald News


JANE STEELE Miss Jane Steele, living a short distance from town, met with a slight accident last week, by being thrown from a wagon. One of the wheels passed over her, but the injury is not severe. July 22, 1859, Manitowoc Pilot


CARL STEFFEN, MRS. Mrs. Carl Steffen celebrated her 61st birthday last week. 19 Sept. 1895, Der Nord Westen


PETER STEFFEN, MRS. Rapids news: Mrs. Peter Steffen was taken seriously ill while visiting at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Fricke at Manitowoc. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 28, 1916 P.5 ******* Mrs. Peter Steffen is seriously ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Heinrichs. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, May 26, 1916 P.3


JAMES STEFFEL MARIBEL MAN IS VICTIM OF PECULIAR ACCIDENT; HURT JAMES STEFFEL PULLED FROM WAGON BY HORSE AND STRIKES ON HEAD AND SERIOUS INJURIES RESULT James Steffel, a well known Maribel farmer, was the victim of a pecular accident late Tuesday and is at his home suffering from serious injuries which may prove fatal. Mr. Steffel's condition is reported improved and there is a chance that he will recover. Steffel was thrown from his wagon and struck on his head and was picked up unconscious in the roadway. Physicians worked over him for twenty-four hours before he regained consciousness. Steffel was driving to his home in Kossuth and was leading a young colt at the side of the wagon. He had wrapped the halter strap about his wrist and hand to handle the animal. While crossing the railway tracks of the Green Bay extension near Cooperstown the colt became frightened at approach of an engine and Mr. Steffel was unable to release his hold on the horse and was pulled from his seat to the ground. He struck on his head and was rendered unconscious. He was removed to a near-by residence and physicians summoned and examination of the injured man, showed his condition to be serious. Later, after twenty-four hours, Steffel regained consciousness and physicians are hopeful that he will recover. The accident happended late Tuesday and word was immediately sent to the family of the injured man and to relatives who reside in this city. Steffel was dragged a considerable distance by the runaway colt but the hold of the man on the halter strap was finally broken and he was saved from serious injury which might have resulted from striking rocks in the roadway or against a fence had the colt left the road. The colt was found near the scene of the accident uninjured. Steffel is known in this city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, December 12, 1912 P.1 ******* (NOTE: The only James Steffel/Stefl is in Evergreen, Manitowoc)


FRANK STEHLE Frank Stehle got his fingers too near some machinery and now has them carefully wrapped in a handerchief. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


AUGUST STEHN Mishicott news: August Stehn is preparing to erect a new frame barn in the spring. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 28, 1882 P. 4


WM. STEINBECK In County court. The supplimentary and final decree in the estate of Wm. Steinbeck was issued. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Manitowoc, Wis. Saturday, January 21, 1899 P. 1


FRANCES STEINBRECHER (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 27 Jan.) Miss Frances Steinbrecher, who for years has worked as a stenographer in the office of the Hamilton Manufacturing Co., has resigned and in two weeks will go to Montana to take a job with the firm of Streater & Lusk. 30 Jan. 1908, Der Nord Westen


WALTER STEINBRECHER Gibson news: A large number of neighbors and friends from far around gathered at Maribel Caves Hotel Friday evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Steinbrecher and family, to bid them farewell and wish them prosperity and good fortune. In their new home where they will move to in the near future, and which they purchased recently in Carney, Mich. The evening was delighfully spent in dancing and at midnight a sumptuous supper was served. Mr. and Mrs. Stenbrecher have lived here a number of years and have gained a large acquaintance. Although their departure will be regretted, they have the well wishes of their many friends. Mar. 1, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


JOHN STEINER Kossuth news: In spite of hard times a number of buildings are being put up hereabouts. John Steiner is building a large stone stable; Joe Vrany and John Heran are each building a stable and Daniel Grumdick is building an addition to his hall and otherwise improving his place. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, June 15, 1886 P.1


MINNIE STEINHAUER F. Boun and Miss Minnie Steinhauer, both of Two Rivers, were quietly married some time ago and kept the affair a secret from their parents until last Sunday. A celebration of the event was held at that time. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, January 18, 1899 P. 4 ******** (Note: I can find nothing in Manitowoc county, it's possible they got married in an adjoining county.


WILLIE STEPHAN Willie Stephan, a lad 13 years of age, left his home on the 15th of September and has not been heard from since. His parents live on 20th street, in the 3rd Ward. Any information concerning their child will be thankfully received by the anxious parents. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 4, 1881 P.1


CHARLES STEPHANI STEPHANI, POP MAN, SELLS OUT HIS BUSINESS Charles Stephani, who for twenty-five years has been engaged in manufacture of pop and soft beverages with a plant on Franklin street, has disposed of the business and will retire. Mr. Stephani has sold the business to Wencel Panosh, who has been in employ of the plant for seven years and who will continue the business. The plant is one of the old established ones of its line and Mr. Stephani has been identified in the manufacture of products for fifty years though owner of the plant only the past 25 years. Mr. Stephani sold the property building and land several months ago to George Kunz. Manitowoc Herald News |Friday, February 10, 1928 | Page 1


ERWIN STEPHANI Erwin Stephani departed for Aurora, Ill., this morning after spending the past few days at his home here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday, May 24, 1916 P.2


WILHELM STEPHANI Wilhelm Stephani celebrated his 58th birthday on Monday. 18 Feb. 1897, Der Nord Westen ******* Wilhelm Stephani celebrated his 60th birthday yesterday. 16 Feb. 1899, Der Nord Westen ******* Wilhelm Stephani celebrated his 66th birthday yesterday. 16 Feb. 1905, Der Nord Westen


WM. STEPHANI, JR. HAD TO CELEBRATE Wm. Stephani Jr. Is Treated to a Surprise. Yesterday was Wm. Stephani, Jr's. birthday and if he thought for an instant that he could pass the event up without celebration, he has been undeceived. Last night, when he least expected it, a number of his friends took possession of his home and proceeded to enjoy themselves. About a dozen of them were from Two Rivers and had made the trip with the avowed purpose of assisting in commemorating this anniversary of his birth. The remainder of the party were from this city and had planned the surprise. Although taken completely unawares their host was equal to the occasion and entered into the spirit of the affair in the usual hearty manner. The evening was passed in feasting and merry making and the enjoyable time was only marred by its brevity. Those present from Two Rivers were: Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Hammel, Mrs. E. Niquette, Mrs. Rehrauer, Messrs. Dr. Farrall, Arthur Baetz, B.E. Lade, Nick Niquette, Chas. Rehrauer, Frank Rehrauer, A.J. Niquette, and the Misses Smith, Lizzie Baetz, Julia Niquette, Emma Henington, Esa Niquette. Those from this city were: Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Stephani, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kries, Messrs. Nich Strauch, Wm. Strauch, John Wolf, Henry Wolf, Ed. Stepahni, and the Misses, Rose Stephani, and Nettie Wainshenck. Jan. 24, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MR. STEPHANY Rapids news: Mr. Stephany, Alverno Postmaster is building an addition to his barn. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 12, 1885 P.4


SARAH STEINBURG WILL SEND FLAG SHE KNITTED TO PRES. COOLIDGE Mrs. Sarah Steinburg Does Stars and Stripes in Beautiful Handicraft Mrs. Sarah Steinburg, 504 Buffalo Street, is proudly exhibiting a bit of unusual handwork, a knitted American flag, to friends and callers at the little store. Mrs. Steinburg is sixty-eight and is justly proud of her accomplishment, a perfectly worked flag that is forty-five inches wide by six feet long, is in one piece with the stripes, the blue field, the knitted stars, tassels to set it off and color that could not be matched in silk. It is a wonderful bit of handwork and Mrs. Steinburg, despite the fact that she has been offered $200 in cash for the flag, is determined to send it to the White House, a gift to President Coolidge. It is probable that arrangements may be made to display the flag in one of the down town show windows before it is forwarded to Washington. It required a year to make the flag. Manitowoc Herald News, Monday, April 02, 1928 Page 15 ********* Mrs. Sarah Steinburg says the report of her presenting the flag to the president is not correct. She wants the flag forwarded to Washington to give President Coolidge a chance to see it and then expects to have it returned to this city. Manitowoc Herald News, Tuesday, April 03, 1928 Page 3


PAT. STEVENS Sheriff's Sale. Manitowoc County, Circuit Court. Adam Bleser against Pat. Stevens. Execution. BY virtue of an execution issued out of the Circuit Court of Manitowoc county in favor of Adam Bleser against Pat. Stevens, I have levied upon the south west quarter of the south west quarter of section thirty two in township nineteen, north of range twenty three east, which said real estate I shall expose for sale and sell at public auction at the Court house in the Village and County of Manitowoc on the 20th day January A D 1860 at the hour of ten o'clock A.M. to satisfy said execution and costs. Louis Kemper, Sheriff. Dated, Sheriff's office Manitowoc County, December 5th 1859. Manitowoc Herald, Wednesday, December 7, 1859 P.2


ARCHIE STEVENSON Archie Stevenson, who has been employed at the local shipyards as one of the expert draftmen, has resigned his position and departed for Detroit last night where he will spend a few days before proceeding to the east. Mr. Stevenson will accept a position which has been tendered him in the Brooklyn navy yard. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 20, 1916 P.2


CELIA STEWART Mrs. Mathilda Neubauer and Mrs. Celia Stewart have returned to Saganaw, Mich., after a visit with their brother, Ed. Wirtz, who is confined to the hospital since his recent injuries at the Rahr plant. Feb. 10, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


CHARLES STEWART, MRS. Judge Oscar Torrison of Chicago, Dr. George Torrison, Mrs. Charles Stewart of Chicago; and Isaac Torrison of Decorah, Ia., were here to spend Sunday with Mrs. O. Torrison, Michigan avenue, a family reunion being held at the Torrison home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, March 13, 1916 P.3


STIEBER (FROM MAPLE GROVE) Long article March 29, 1855, Manitowoc Tribune


JOHN STIEFVATER (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 18 Sep.) Peter Stiefvater of Missouri is here visiting his parents Mr. and Mrs. John Stiefvater, as well as the latter's 2 daughters, Mrs. Ambros Pfefferle and Miss Mary from Appleton. 20 Sep. 1906, Der Nord Westen


LORENZ STIEFVATER (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 09 Oct.) Also, Elderly Lorenz Stiefvater fell quite ill with peritonitis. His daughter, Mrs. Adoline Proell and her daughter Mrs. Geo. Vits of Manitowoc hastened to his bedside. He is expected to get better. 11 Oct. 1906, Der Nord Westen


MRS. J.M. STIPPIC Mrs. J.M. Stippic departed for Milwaukee this morning to spend a few days after which she will join her husband at Saxon, Wis., to make their home for the summer. Mrs. Stippic has been visiting her mother, Mrs. Hamel, here the past few weeks. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, May 25, 1916 P.3


CATHERINE STITCH Miss Catherine Stitch has returned to her home at Milwaukee after an extended visit with her sister, Mrs. Frank Linder of this city. Mar. 14, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


J.L. STITT Two Rivers news: J.L. Stitt, at one time a prominent teacher of the county, has recently been engaged as foreman in the tannery of the Wisconsin Leather Co., a few miles north of this place. The position which Mr. Stitt takes has been made vacant by the resignation of C.B. Whitcomb. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 7, 1882 P. 4


JAS. S. STITT Two Rivers news: Jas. S. Stitt, at one time one of the bright lights in the pedagogical corps of this county, but who quit the business a year ago to become assistant foreman in the tannery of the Wis. Leather Co., a few miles north of here, has decided to make a start in the near future to seek his fortune elsewhere. Jim is a young man who is deserving of success, and we earnestly hope that he will meet a full measure of it. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 8, 1881 P. 1


ALBERT STOCK TIMOTHY MAN WANTED MARRIAGE LICENSE, DIDN'T SAY SO AND GOT HUNTING LICENSE. HURRIES BACK Albert Stock, a Timothy man, wanted a license and applied to Miss Rose Wanish, assistant at the county clerk's office for the paper. Stock neglected to designate the kind of license he wanted and Miss Wanish, who had been kept busy for a week issuing hunting licenses, presumed that the Timothy man was to join the hunters and provided him with a permit. Stock departed with the license but a few minutes later returned, and explained that a mistake had been made in the license. He confided to Miss Wanish that he was a candidate for matrimony and wouldn't have time to hunt this season and the hunting license was no good to him. Miss Wanish issued a marriage license and Stock departed satisfied and with the statement that hereafter he would say what he wanted. Mr. Stock is to wed Miss Jennie Daeke of this city. Miss Daeke has been employed as a bookkeeper at the offices of the Guse Lumber Co. the couple will reside at Timothy. Sept. 04, 1915, Manitowoc Daily Herald


C. STOCK C. Stock has bought out the interest of A. Liebig in the firm of A. Liebig & Co., and that popular drug store will now be under the exclusive control of Mr. Stock, in name as well as in fact. Enjoying the friendship of the young and the confidence of the old, the new firm cannot fail being successful. Lifting the veil that hides the future, we see Stocks so rich that he is enabled to wear golden spectacles and set up the cigars to the Y.M.C.A. at every meeting. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 4, 1881 P.1


EMIL STOCK Fingers had to suffer last week. Emil Stock started the music by trying to chop off his thumb and he very nearly succeeded. Then came Max Stauss, who while trying to open a can opened his index finger instead and now wears a large glove on it. As a sort of a finale the foreman of this office was unfortunate enough to get the fourth and fifth fingers of his right hand smashed. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


EMIL STOCK Emil Stock celebrated his 31st birthday on Sun. 20 Aug. 1891, Der Nord Westen


WALTER STOCK Walter Stock and John Herman left yesterday for Fond du Lac where they will be employed at the Palmer House, now owned by G.A. Alexander. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, June 21, 1904 P. 2


CASPER STOCKINGER Caspar Stockinger, well-known musician, suffered a stroke Tues. afternoon and his right side is paralyzed. 31 Aug. 1905, Der Nord Westen


STOCKMEYER Edward Schaffland and W.E. Seibel and families were participants at a large party at Two Rivers Sunday, a reunion of the Stockmeyer and Zlatnik families at which more than sixty guests attended. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, October 26, 1903 P. 2


OSCAR STOCKMEYER (From the correspondent in Two Rivers) Oscar Stockmeyer has accepted a clerkship in a large drug store in Fond du Lac. His family traveled there on Saturday to join him. 24 Oct. 1907, Der Nord Westen


GEN. JOHN O. STOCKWELL The Inter-Ocean says that Gen. John O. Stockwell of Manitowoc, Wis. was at the soldiers reunion, in Chicago last week. We are ashamed to own it, but it is a fact nevertheless that no such mighty man figures in this locality. We have a few majors, however, whose military qualifications in times of peace, answer ever purpose; but none of them were at the reunion, last week, as their blouses and blue coats were worn out long ago, and times are too tight to get new ones for one spree. Manitowoc Co. Chronicle (Two Rivers), May 18, 1875


SIMON STOK The following estates were admitted to probate during the month of February, 1916: Joseph Drill; Isaac Halverson; Jacob Tossen; Morgan Connell; Mervin Geraldson; Ernst Vogelsang; Joseph Holly; Torger K. Hougen; Sidona Boettger; Mary F. Seidl; Simon Stok; Dorothea Schmidt; Rankchild Anderson; Joseph Thalhammer; Catherine Lenerville. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 4, 1916 P.5


MRS. E. STOKER …Mrs. E. Stoker appeared before the council and asked aid to get back to New York, where her children, she claimed, were in danger of being thrust out of their rooms for non-payment of rent. It was found that a subscription had been started for her and that Peter Stoker had helped her, but the means forthcoming were not sufficient, and so the council granted her request and charged it up to the county. Manitowoc Daily Herald, July 25, 1900 P.1


HARRY STOKER Harry Stoker, taken in charge for the burglary of the Williams House and sentenced to three years' at the Green Bay refomatory, was transported this morning in charge of a deputy. Stoker has exhibited indifference since his arrest, but his attempt to escape from the officers on the night of his capture resulted in close survilleance (sic) of the prisoner and he wore the braclets when taken away today. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, September 3, 1903 P. 1


CHARLES STOKES Kellnersville news: Charles Stokes a former resident of this place was married at Sturgeon Bay a few days since. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4


EMIL STOKES Kellnersville news: Emil Stokes left to visit his brother Charles, at Sturgeon Bay on Monday. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 13, 1885 P.4


MRS. FRANK STOKES Kellnersville news: Mrs. Frank Stokes left to visit her father in Antigo this week. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 9, 1884 P.4


ED. STOLBERG Two Rivers news: On Tuesday of last week, P. Petruski a farmer who lives a few miles north of here and J. Schmokler a railroad employee at Manitowoc, who were on their way to the latter place created considerable excitement in this city. They stopped at the Washington House and the landlord perceiving that they wanted to make a disturbance, ordered them out. Somewhat enraged, they left and entered a neighboring hostelry and got pretty well under the influence of "fire water." Schmokler began to scuffle about the room with Ed. Stolberg, and finally it grew serious and Stolberg struck him above one of the eyes inflicting quite a gash. Stolberg not wanting to have anything more to do with the fellow, immediately took his leave, Schmokler being armed with a revolver fired two shots at hap hazzard, but it is suspected with the intention of shooting Stolberg. Petruski and Schmokler were arrested and charged $7 and $13 respectively besides enjoying a nights lodging in the "lock up." Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 1885 P.3


HENRY STOLL Henry Stoll of Rockville celebrated his birthday last Wed. with a big party - 4 kegs of beer - 662 people (not counting the children - many other details). 05 June 1890, Der Nord Westen


THEODOR STOLLBERG (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 01 Feb.) There were many local birthdays on Tues. last week - Theodor Stollberg, his 39th. 04 Feb. 1897, Der Nord Westen ******* (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 30 Jan.) Theodor Stollberg celebrated his 41st birthday last Thurs. 02 Feb. 1899, Der Nord Westen ******* Theodor Stollberg celebrated his 43rd birthday in grand style Sat. and Sun. 31 Jan. 1901, Der Nord Westen


MAYOR STOLZE Mayor Stolze sends the Herald a post card from Jacksonville, Fla., showing the orange trees in blossom and several other scenes of mid-usmmer (sic). The card arrived on the wings of a 10 below zero wind. That's rubbing it in. Feb. 8, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MARTIN STOLLZMAN Edwards news: Martin Stollzman and Henry Bohne, both young farmers of Meeme, sold their farms this week. The former sold his to his neighbor, Mr. Kamman; the later sold his to his father; the former received the neat and desirable sum of $7,000 for his; what the figures were in the other case we were unable to learn. Both are now contemplating removing to Iowa, where they will re enter farming on a much more comprehensive scale. Success is what their friends who have shared their society for years, and who now regret their proposed departure wish them in their new fields of labor. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 4


MARTIN STOLZMAN Edwards news: Wm. Wilke, of Eaton, Moritz Rossberg, of Centerville, and Martin Stolzman, of Meeme, will at different times during the next few weeks, sell their personal property at public auction. Anton Schad, the celebrated auctioneer of Schleswig, who last year earned $280 as auctioneer, will sell on all these occasions. In the spring Mr. Wilkes will go to Nebraska, Mr. Stoltzman will follow Mr. Bohne to Iowa, and Mr. Rossberg will cross the sea to again view Germany, the land of his birth. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 21, 1882 P. 10


MRS. STRACK (From the correspondent in St. Nazianz, 14 Aug.) Mrs. J.P. Schreihart of Manitowoc and Mrs. Strack of Milwaukee, along with their children, visited their sister, Mrs. Proell here. 16 Aug. 1906, Der Nord Westen


MIKE STRASSMANN Mike Strassmann, the farmer who resides about 8 miles outside of Kiel, started work Fri. with his sons to clean out a 50 ft. well. The pulley on the crane broke, so the older son sought to repair it. In the meantime, the younger brother climbed into the bucket in order to more quickly reach the foot of the well and fell to the bottom. The boy broke his neck and lies in critical condition. 09 July 1896, Der Nord Westen


JOHN STRATHEARN STRATHEARN STOPS TRAIN TO SAVE A LIFE Sleeper on Track Misses Death by Ten Feet Applying the brakes and stopping his train suddenly, when it was within ten feet of the prostrate body on the track ahead of it, John Strathearn, veteran engineer of No. 124, on the Manitowoc-Green Bay line of the North Western, yesterday saved the life of an unknown man at Pulaski. The man, who is believed to be demented, was taken in charge of authorities at Pulaski and will be examined. The train was proceeding at the usual rate on the run from the north into Green Bay yesterday, on its way to Manitowoc, when Engineer Strathearn from the window of his cab, noticed an obstruction on the track when he was about one mile east of Pulaski. As the engine approached the spot Mr. Strathearn discovered what appeared to be the form of a man, the body extending across the rails, the head resting upon what looked to be a suit case. The engineer sounded the warning whistle and when there was no move on part of the bundle on the track, applied the brakes and brought the train to a stop when it was not more than ten feet from the object on the rails. May Have Wanted to Die Although investigation revealed that the man was apparently sound asleep on the track, members of the train crew were not so sure that he was not feigning sleep and that he had deliberately sought death under the wheels of the train by making a bed on the rails. The man had rested his head on a suit case which had been placed on one of the rails while his body extended across the track. When the train crew reached him the man made no move to get up and had to be aroused. His actions, however, caused suspicion that he had not been so soundly asleep as he wanted the crew to believe and was taken aboard the train and turned over to the authorities at Pulaski. Mar. 22, 1923, Manitowoc Herald News


ARTHUR STRAUCH Arthur Strauch, the sickly son of the late John Strauch, was brought to the State School in Sparta by Constable Henry Schweitzer on Monday. 25 Feb. 1897, Der Nord Westen


ARTHUR STRAUCH Arthur Strauch, who has been receiving treatment at the Northern hospital, has been pronounced incurable by attending physicians, and has been returned to the county asylum. He has been an inmate of the Oshkosh institution for two years. Apr. 10, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HENRY STRAUCH Henry Strauch, aged 3 years, while crossing Washington street, on the south side was run over by a farmers wagon, and had both bones in his right leg crushed above the ankle, Dr. Easton attended the little sufferer, and has hopes of saving the limb. The reckless driving of vehicles of all kinds in our city should be put a stop to by our police, and the offenders punished. Oct. 12, 1871, Manitowoc Pilot


JOHN STRAUCH John Strauch is here from Montana on a visit to friends. This is Mr. Strauch's first visit to the city in more than ten years. Relatives had heard nothing from him for sometime and were much surprised by his arrival. May 22, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MAX STRAUSS Max Stauss dealt out some pure Havanna cigars, imported direct from Cuba. He received a box of them as a present from a friend and generously distributed them among the boys. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 1, 1881 P. 1


GUSTAV STREICH Congratulations to Gustav Streich who celebrated his 45th birthday last Fri. 23 Jan. 1890, Der Nord Westen


GUSTAV STREICH Gustav Streich celebrated his 45th birthday on Sat. 22 Jan. 1891, Der Nord Westen ****** Gustav Streich celebrated his 51st birthday Sun. with friends. 21 Jan. 1897, Der Nord Westen


FRIDA STEMANS Kellnersville news: We are going to have a tailor in our village. Frida Stemans a young man who can cut fit and make a suit of clothes fit for anyone and everyone. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 5, 1885 P.6


HERMAN STRODHOFF RAPIDS MAN LOSES PART OF HAND IN SAW For a second time within three days the circular saw has claimed a victim in Manitowoc county. On Saturday Fred Herman, a former Cato man, had a portion of his hand cut off while engaged in operating a wood saw, falling against the saw when he slipped. Today Herman Strodhoff, a Rapids man, met with a similar accident, his hand being caught in the saw when he attempted to save himself from falling. Mr. Strodhoff lost two fingers of his left hand and a portion of the palm as a result of the accident. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, March 30, 1914 p.8 ******** Mr. and Mrs. Herman Strodhoff departed this morning for Milwaukee where they will visit their daughter, Mrs. Emil Hacker, who resides in that city. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 18, 1916 P.3


ADOLPH STROUF Larrabee news: Miss Flora Strouf of Montana is visiting friends and relatives here. She is spending this week at Adolph Strouf's. Feb. 5, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FLORA STROUF Larrabee news: Miss Flora Strouf of Montana is visiting friends and relatives here. She is spending this week at Adolph Strouf's. Feb. 5, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald ================================================== Mishicot news: Miss Flora Strouf of Montana is visiting relatives here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, February 25, 1916 P.4


LADISLAV STROUF Larrabee news: A number of Ladislav Strouf's friends gave a farewell party Saturday evening. Mr. Strouf left for Montana where he is running a ranch. He has been visiting with his parents the past four months. A pair of bright eyes at the corners will miss him. April 7, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


PASTOR STRUBE Pastor Strube will soon be leaving to reside in Milwaukee. 04 Apr. 1889, Der Nord Westen


PETER STRUPP, MRS. ARTHUR STRUPP Mrs. Peter Strupp and son, Arthur, have returned from Michigan where they attended the wedding of Mrs. Strupp's brother, Otto, who took Miss Martha Ohn of Collins for his bride. The local people also spent some time visiting with the W.F. Kolemchek and family at Crivitz en route home. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 8, 1916 P.3


PETER STRUPP, MRS. Mrs. Joseph Kolensyck of Newton, accompanied by Mrs. Peter Strupp and son, Arthur, have departed for Carney, Mich., to visit Mrs. Kolansyck's (sic) daughter, Mrs. Alex Rieck and they will also visit her son Otto at Madeau, Mich., where he is owner of a large farm. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Wednesday April 26, 1916 P.3


HANK STRUSS A farmer and wife came into town yesterday to make purchases, etc. During the day the man filled himself up with "nose paint." He then hitched up his horses and drove around town, having a grand hurrah all by himself. The woman going to where the horses were kept, and not finding them, thought the man had gone home, and left her, so she took the train for home. Toward evening the man got a little too uproarious, and Hank Struss, after considerable trouble, took him to the cooler. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 10, 1882 P. 1


WM. STUCKE The Chicago Times of last Saturday states that Mr. Wm. Stucke was adjudged insane and committed to the county jail. Mr. Stucke was at one time a heavy grain buyer in our city. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, December 27, 1881 P. 1


HELEN STUEBER Miss Helen Stueber left to spend Easter with her parents at Shoto, West Twin road. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, April 21, 1916 P.3


JAKOB STUEBER Jakob Stueber celebrated his 34th birthday with a celebration last Saturday. 30 July 1896, Der Nord Westen ****** Jakob Stueber will celebrate his 35th birthday next Sunday. 22 July 1897, Der Nord Westen


MRS. JAKOB STUEBER Mrs. Jakob Stueber celebrated her 33rd birthday Tues. with friends and relatives. 29 Oct. 1896, Der Nord Westen


DR. ARTHUR STUECK Dr. Arthur Stueck, who has been visiting at his home at Mishicott, and with friends in the city, returned to Milwaukee this morning. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, June 10, 1916 P.3


EDWARD STUECK Edward Stueck has returned from up north. He brought back a bride formerly Miss Ruth Mackey. Jan. 25, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


HATTIE STUEMPGES Miss Hattie Stuempges is at Milwaukee to spend the day with her parents, departing this morning. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, May 20, 1916 P.2


HERMANN STUEMPGES (SON) On Mon. the 6-yr. old son of Hermann Stuempges here was shot in the eye with an arrow by a playmate. He was injured so badly that there is no hope of saving the eye. The boy was taken to a specialist in Milwaukee yesterday. 05 Dec. 1901, Der Nord Westen (NOTE: This is probably Ervin Stuempges who was 4 on the 1900 Manitowoc 7 ward census.)


FRANK STUPECKY MAN UNDER COURT MARTIAL AT PRAGUE HAS RELATIVES HERE JAN HASLAVA, FACING DEATH FOR WRITINGS, WEDDED TO GRANDDAUGHTER OF FRANK STUPECKY Under court marital at Prague, Bohemia, for alleged sedition in articles of which he is the author, the case of Jan Haslava, prominent as an author and writer, is of interest here where Haslava is known as the husband of a granddaughter of Frank Stupecky, of this city. According to reports received here Haslava has been held for trial by court martial and his conviction may mean that he will face death. Appeals have been made in an effort to save him, but with what success, if any, is not known. Haslava married Elsie Herman, a daughter of Mrs. Blanche Herman, nee Stupecky, in California a few years ago, the couple having met there while Haslava was in the United States on a tour. The wedding was a social event, Haslava being a social lion in the West during his stay here. The couple later sailed for Europe locating at Prague where Haslava is prominent as a writer. Recently articles written by Haslava are said to have attracted the attention of government officials and to have been strongly condemned and their continued appearance led to his arrest on a charge that carries with it court martial trial. News of the troubles of the Haslava family reached here in letters to relatives from Mrs. Haslava and the case is being followed with much interest. Mrs. Haslava is known in the city, though it has been years since she visited here with her mother. Manitowoc Daily Herald,Thursday, May 20, 1915, Page 8


JULIUS STUPECKY ILL LUCK FOLLOWS STUPECKY FAMILY FOR MANY MONTHS; ILLNESS. Ill luck has hit the family of Julius Stupecky the past few months. Some time ago Mr. Stupecky's brother died and the following Sunday Mrs. Stupecky was taken to the hospital and underwent a serious operation. Mrs. Stupecky had not recovered when Mr. Stupecky was forced to take to his bed as result of a severe attack of quincy. Two weeks ago he suffered an attack of la grippe and had just recovered and returned to work when he again suffered from quinsy and is reported to be seriously ill. Mar. 28, 1916, Manitowoc Daily Herald


MRS. R. SUETTINGER Dr. Gau of St. Cloud, Minnesota, who for several weeks has been visiting his daughter here, Mrs. R. Suettinger, has returned home. The 85-year old gentleman is still hearty and told your correspondent that he still keeps up his practice. He said he has never lost a diphtheria patient despite the many cases he has handled. 11 Apr. 1907, Der Nord Westen


MRS. R. SUETTINGER Mrs. R. Suettinger, Sr. had an important last week. All of her daughters - Agnes, Anna, Emma, Stella, and Salvina, along with all of their children, came to visit their mother and grandmother. All have now left except Salvina. It was a great joy for Mrs. Suettinger to have a visit from all her children and grandchildren at one time. Aug. 6, 1891, Der Nord Westen


MRS. ROBERT SUETTINGER, SR. (From the correspondent in Two Rivers, 17 Nov.) Mrs. Robert Suettinger, Sr. celebrated her 64th birthday last week among a large group of friends. 19 Nov. 1891, Der Nord Westen


FRANK SUGARWATER Steinthal news: Frank Sugarwater who located here last spring as blacksmith has done an extensive business. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 17, 1885 P.4


JOSEPH SUGARWATER Steinthal news: Joseph Sugarwater a young farmer of Eaton had his legs badly frozen one night this winter while coming home from Manitowoc. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, February 23, 1886 P.2


ALICE SULLIVAN Miss Alice Sullivan has returend to Kiel where she teaches after spending the week end at her home on North Eleventh street. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, April 24, 1916 P.3


ALICE SULLIVAN Miss Alice Sullivan, who teaches at Kiel, is home to spend a few days. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, May 29, 1916 P.2


CON SULLIVAN St. Nazianz news: Miss Sarah Crowe raffled a log cabin quilt in the Weinkoetz hall last Saturday night and a dance followed. The spacious hall was filled with boys and girls and an amusing time resulted. Con. Sullivan and Herman Vecker discoursed excellent music. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, September 14, 1886 P.1


CORNELIUS SULLIVAN Destructive Fire.- The house of Mr. Cornelius Sullivan, in the town of Kossuth, caught fire on Monday night last, about 12 o'clock, and but a few minues elapsed before the building was in ashes. Mrs. S. was sick at the time, and it required the most active efforts to save her and her seven small children. In the house was a year's provisions, consisting of flour, pork, etc., all of which was consumed- leaving Mr. S. and his family entirely destitute of clothing and the other necessaries of life. Mr. Sullivan is an old resident of the county, and the products of ten years hard labor have been swept away in one night. His case is truly a pitiable one, and we hope tht the benevolent of our village will not be backward in extending him relief. Mr. James B. Crowley has kindly consented to receive donations in money, provisions, and clothing, for Mr. Sullivan, and they can be sent to his house, or he will call for them when invited to do so. Let every man and woman give their mite, and assist a worthy and deserving family. Dec. 16, 1859 P. 3, The Manitowoc Pilot


MARIE SULLIVAN Brockville news Our local school has been closed for the past few days, our teacher, Miss Marie Sullivan having spent her vacation at her home in Meeme. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, February 25, 1916 P.4


PAT SULLIVAN Pat. Sullivan returned from his trip to Chicago last Tuesday. He was in attendance on his sister's wedding. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, January 3, 1882 P. 1


THOMAS SULLIVAN St. Nazians news (sic): Thomas Sullivan has concluded to engage in the dairy business, and has entered Koeppler's factory to practice cheese making. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, May 26, 1885 P.4


TOM SULLIVAN BADGER ENGINE CO. NO. 1.- Thos. Sullivan has been elected Secretary of this Fire Company. "Tom" will make a good officer, and we rejoice at his promotion. Oct. 14, 1859 P. 3, The Manitowoc Pilot


MRS. G.A. SUNDBY Mrs. G.A. Sundby of Rio, and Miss Inga Bredeson were here for a visit with their brother, Osuld Bredeson here. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Monday, March 13, 1916 P.3


PETER F. SUSIER Mr. Peter F. Susier of Gibson, and H. Wilson of this place are very sick. Mar. 4, 1884, The Lakeshore Times


ROBERT SUTTINGER Robert Suttinger of Two Rivers caught a 3 ft. long, 20 lb. Muskellunge in the river there. 10 Oct. 1901, Der Nord Westen


ALBERT SVACINA Grimms news: Albert Svacina installed a system of water works in his cattle barn, each cow having her own sanitary water bubbler to drink from. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, March 18, 1916 P.5


JOS. SWADA Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Swada, of Chicago, are visiting with relatives in the county for a week. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, August 4, 1904 P. 2


MRS. E.S. SWAZEY Mrs. H.B. Hamilton of Two Rivers departed on a journey to New York this morning, where she will visit her daughter, Mrs. E.S. Swazey, who resides there. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, March 10, 1916 P.3


C.W. SWEETING C.W. Sweeting was in the city last evening receiving the congratulations of his numerous friends. He has received notification of his appointment as assistant Dairy and food Commissioner and will assume his new duties about Dec. 1. The change has not affected Charley, as he is the same old boy, as of old. Nov. 9, 1899, Manitowoc Daily Herald


FRANK SWEIDINGER The marriage of Frank Sweidinger to Miss Anna Pankratz will be solemnized June 19. The bride is a daughter of M. Pankratz. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Thursday, June 7, 1900 P. 2


NICHOLAS SWEIG Two Rivers news: Nicholas Sweig, who has been a resident of the Tannery for a number of years past, moved with his family to Milwaukee on Friday last, where he will continue in the employ of the Wisconsin Leather Company. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, November 22, 1881 P. 4


MRS. FRANK SWEITINGER Mrs. Frank Sweitinger and children of Cleveland Ohio, are in the city guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Pankratz. Mrs. Sweitinger is a daughter of the latter. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, June 21, 1904 P. 6


ALFRED SWENSON Niles news: Alfred Swenson arrived from Oregon last week. He came back after his brothers Wallace and Ole. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, Nov. 25, 1884 P.3


MR. SWETLIK Kellnersville news: Messrs. Ledivind Reuben and Swetlik will go to Minnesota this week with a view to purchasing land. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, August 4, 1885 P.1


EDWIN SYKORA Tisch Mills news: Edwin Sykora is employed at A. Dvorak's. Edwin commenced work last week. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Saturday, April 22, 1916 P.4


JOS. SYKORA Polifka's Corners news: Jos. Sykora had a "bee" of ten men hauling wood for the Rockwell Lime company, one day last week. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Friday, February 25, 1916 P.4


BENJAMIN SYMES Referee's Sale. Circuit Court, County of Manitowoc.-Michael Mahoney against George Rice, Albert Journey, Benjamin Symes, W.W. Young, A.C. Gibson, and Marshall Morse. Judgement of Foreclosure and Sale. IN virture of, and pursuant to a judgment rendered in said Court, in the above entitled action, dated the 3d day of November, 1859, I, Edgar D. Beardsley, Referee appointed in said judgment, shall expose for sale and sell at public auction, at the Court House in the village of Manitowoc, in the county of Manitowoc, on Wednesday, the 7th day of March, 1860, at the hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day, the following described mortgaged premises, or so much thereof as may be necessary to raise the amount of said judgement, interest and costs, together with the expense of sale. All the following described premises situate in the village of Manitowoc, county of Manitowoc, and State of Wisconsin, to wit: Lot number six, (6) in block number one hundred and sixty six, (166). Dated Manitowoc, November 26, 1850. E.D. Beardsley, Referee. Wm. M. Nichols, Pl'ffs Att'y. Manitowoc Pilot, Friday, December 2, 1859 P.3


JOHN SYMES John Symes, the valedictorian of the High School Class of '81, is teaching at the Rapids. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, October 11, 1881 P. 1


JOSEPH SYMES Business card: JOSEPH SYMES: Dealer in STOVES; also, manufacture of Tin, Sheet-iron and Copper Ware. All kinds of Repairing done. Shop on Eight, at nearly opposite the First National Bank. Manitowoc Pilot, Jan. 4, 1870


LUDWIG SYPIEWSKI BOY GOES TO STATE SCHOOL. Polish Lad Committed to Industrial Reform Institution. Ludwig Sypiewski, the 12-year old Polish lad who was recently the cause of a mild sensation in court and police circles, is now an inmate of the State Industrial school for boys at Waukesha where he will remain until he attains to the age of 21 years. The commitment was issued by Probate Judge Chloupek Monday and met the approval of the parents of the boy. Since his return from the school a few weeks ago, the lad continued to disregard the commands of his parents and has violated every promise made to the court, so that there was no hope of reform. When informed of his commitment, the child pleaded for one more trial, but this was the same story he put up before and officers were unmoved by it. Manitowoc Daily Herald, Tuesday, September 29, 1903 P. 1


LUDWIG SYPINEWSKI Ludwig Sypinewski, an unimprovable delinquent, age 12, has been sent to the state industrial school for boys in Waukesha where he will stay until he is 21. 01 Oct. 1903, Der Nord Westen