SHIPS AND SHIPWRECKS OF MANITOWOC COUNTY



MAGELLAN Other names : none Official no. : C none Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1873, L. Shickluna, St. Catharines, Ont. Specs : 142x26x12, 370 t. Date of loss : 1877, Nov 9 Place of loss : Wisconsin, near Two Rivers Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 9 [all] Carrying : corn Detail : She foundered in a storm and became a total loss. At first it was thought that she had simply been overwhelmed by a gale, but it later appeared out that she had been run down & totally destroyed, probably by the propeller JOSEPH L. HURD. Crewmen aboard another Canadian schooner, C.P. MERRICK, claimed to have witnessed the collision. At least one crewman's body was torn to pieces. Another theory said that she capsized in storm and the wreckage was then inadvertently run over by the HURD. Her wreckage came ashore 3 mi N of Manitowoc. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ________________________________ ANOTHER LAKE HORROR! The Schooner Magellan, of St. Catherines, Canada, Lost, Together With Her Entire Crew. Four of the Bodies Found on the Beach Between This Place and Manitowoc. It is no uncommon thing, at this season of the year, to hear of disasters on the lake and the sacrifice of human lives to the fury of the wind and waves; consequently the wreck of a vessel is news that is not likely to create much alarm only among those who have friedns or property exposed to the many dangers incident to lake navigation after the sun has crossed the equinox. But notwithstanding that the public mind is more or less prepared for the news of disaster to some of the many vessels that help to carry on commerce of the lakes, the coast is eagerly scanned after each storm for some evidence of ship wreck and lost of life. The latest loss on the lake occurred of this point last Thursday night, during one of the most terrific gales that has been known for years. On Friday morning the spars of a vessel, which proved to be the Magellan, of St. Catharines, Canada, a full-sized canaler, valued at $14,000, and loaded with 20,000 bushels of corn, bound from Chicago to Toronto, were seen sticking out of the water a short distance northeast of the harbor piers. At the time of the discovery the seas were running so high that it was impossible to get out to the wreck, and it was too late for the life- boat crew to be of any service in rescuing the lives of those on board the ill-fated craft. About noon on Friday the wreck parted and most of the hulk was carried off by the current which sweeps around the point to the southwest whenever there is a northeaster, and was beached about midway between this place and Manitowoc. The crew of the Magellan consisted of eight persons, all of whom are lost. Their names, as far as can be ascertained, are as follows: John Belyea, captain; Jessup Belyea, first mate; John Sullivan, second mate; Sandy Kennedy, cook; a man by the name of Baker and another by the name of Marshall. the crew are from St. Catharines, with the exception of Marshall, who is from Clayton, N.Y. Thus far, four of the bodies have been recovered, but only one of them has been positively identified. Photographs have been taken and forwarded to friends. A leg, torn from the body of another of the victims of the disaster, has been driven ashore by the waves, but as it is badly crushed and mangled it is probably that the body, if found, will be mutilated beyond recognition. The cause of the disaster is at present unknown, and perhaps may never be known. Some are of the opinion that she sprung a leak, owing to injuries received while being towed out of the Chicago river, and that she became unmanageable in the heavy seas. Others at Manitowoc are firm in the belief that she was run down while at anchor off the point by one of the large Lake Superior propellers. The Inter-Ocean of yesterday intimates that a collision occurred between the schooners Magellan and Neelon, and that both vessels are sunk near this place. As the Neelon had a woman cook on board, and as several articles of woman's apparel have been washed ashore, it looks as thought this may be true. Indeed, that paper has telegraphed the tug men at this place that it has positive evidence that the Neelon and the Magellan went down together, and directs them to keep a lookout along the shore. A dispatch dated Port Colborn, Ont. Nov. 10, says: "A gloom was cast over the community today by the intelligence from Mr. Richards, of Manitowoc, Wis., of the loss of the schooner Magellan and all hands near Two Rivers, Wis. Capt. Belyea leaves a wife, who is at present very ill. The cook, a young man named Kennedy, belonged to this place, and all the crew belonged to this district. Capt Belyea owned a two-thirds interest in the vessel. She was built in St. Catharines, rated A1, and was partially insured." Manitowoc County Chronicle, Nov. 13, 1877 (Contributed by Tyler) _______________________________ THE CANADIAN SCHOONER MAGELLAN FOUNDERED IN LAKE MICHIGAN. Special Dispatch to the New York Times. Chicago, Ill., Nov. 10 - It was rumored last night, and confirmed to-day, that a large vessel had foundered off Three Rivers on Lake Michigan. The first intelligence of the disaster was received in the shape of two masts found floating off the pier. A tug was immediately summoned from Manitowoc, and search began. About half way between the two places a large portion of the hulk was discovered upon the beach. Near by was the body of a man clad in sailor's apparel, but unknown to the people on the tug. About 4 o'clock in the afternoon another body was found about a mile north of Manitowoc. Nothing could be found on his body to denote who he was or to what vessel he belonged. It transpires to-day that the lost vessel was the Magellan, and that every soul on board was lost. She was a Canadian schooner, and one of the finest of her class: was loaded with 20,488 bushels of corn, and was bound from this city to Toronto. Her crew consisted of eight men all told and she was commanded by Capt. Jessup, a man highly esteemed on the lakes. He hailed from Catherines, Canaday. Four more bodies were found to-day along the shore, but the names of none of them can be learned. The New York Times, November 11, 1877 (Contributed by Tyler) From the Manitowoc Herald November 8, 1922 Magellan Was Lost 44 Years Ago Today Today, November 8, is the forty-fourth anniversary of the loss of the steamer Magellan, a Canadian vessel which went down in a terrific storm off Two Rivers on November 8, 1878, with her entire crew, eight men and one woman. Reports current at the time that the Magellan had been struck and sunk by the steamer Hurd, which later put into port here for shelter, were never proved, although bodies of the victims of the wreck, when found on the beach showed every evidence of having been through the propellor of some boat, one having an arm cut off, another a large chunk of flesh ripped from the back. The Magellan carried a cargo of 28,000 bushels of corn and for ten days after the wreck farmers shoveled corn by the wagon load and hauled it away from the lake shore between this city and Two Rivers. The loss of the Magellan was one of the worst tragedies of the lakes in this vicinity. ______________________ From the Manitowoc Herald June 16, 1923 ANCHOR OF STR. MAGELLAN, LOST OFF TWO RIVERS 46 YEARS AGO, RECOVERED BY DREDGE YESTERDAY First Wreckage Found of Boat on Which Nine Lost Lives Found by Local Contractors At Work There A bit of ancient marine history, the wreck of the Canadian schooner Magellan with the loss of nine lives, was vividly recalled through a find made yesterday by the dredge of the McMullen & Pitz Construction company while at work on a trench for the new lake intake of the Two Rivers municipal water works plant. The find is nothing more or less than the anchor of the lost schooner together with a section of the chain which was used to hold it in place on the vesel and it is the most interesting bit of salvage that has been unearthed in years. The anchor was brought up by the big dipper of the dredge yesterday afternoon and was taken to the shore where it now rests on the dock near the Reiss Coal company yards. Disposition of the relic is to be decided upon later but a movement is already on foot at Two Rivers to have it placed in a park as a memento. Story of the Wreck The real story of the Magellan will probably never be learned. The craft, which was the "canaler" type, was a big boat for her day, being of 500 tons capacity, and was enroute from Chicago to Oswego with a cargo of 20,000 bushels of corn. She hailed from Toronto and was sailed by a Canadian crew. Because of the storm she came to anchor outside of Two Rivers and the story is that she was run down by the Joseph L Hurd of the Leopold Austrian line but this was never investigated. The Hurd came into this port with some damage to her bow and a shifted cargo, retrimmed and left but no statement was made regarding any accident. The accident occurred on November 8, 1877 and the Magellan with all hands on board went down to Davy Jones locker. Days later the sea gave up its dead, the bodies being washed to the shore where they were recovered by people from this city. The finding of the anchor of the Magellan at the point off Two Rivers would indicate, say marine men, that when the storm broke the boat may have dropped anchor at that spot and that the vessel tore loose in the storm to be wrecked and sunk nearby, probably within a mile or two of the place where the anchor was recovered yesterday. The wrecked hull of the lost steamer for many years has lain on the beach between this city and Two Rivers and the fact that pieces of the boat still are intact points to the staunchness of the craft which must have been of sturdy build and timber to have withstood for so long a time the onslaught of the elements, the winds, rains, snows and ice. Photograph Dead of Wreck The victims of the disaster were all brought to a building east of Eighth street, near where the Torrison warehouse is now, where a rather unusual procedure was taken. The dead bodies were placed in standing positions and photographs taken of all of them. The photographs were forwarded to Toronto, home port of the vessel and all of the bodies claimed by relatives with a single exception, that of Emil Gilius Larson which was buried in the Potter's Field at Evergreen cemetery. But Larson's grave did not go unmarked. For the purpose of future identification a wooden board with the name of Larson, the date of the disaster and other information marked the spot and then years ago a visit to the spot by Nic Kettenhoffen resulted in a permanent monument at his own expense. It is not an elaborate headstone but it is a wonderful piece of work showing the old style anchor with hawser attached and bearing on its face an inscription that gives Larson's history as far as it was known here. Anchor Weighs 1,000 lbs. And that anchor which was recovered from the bottom of the lake might have been the model from which the headstone was taken. It is an anchor of type not seen in this age and day and probably dates back seventy to a hundred years. It is what in the olden days was known as an Oswego anchor. The anchor is heavy iron, the total weight being close to a 1,000 pounds but the cross bar is of wood, heavy, bowed, bound with heavy iron straps. The wooden cross bar is eight feet across and is a remarkable piece of work and that the artisan who made the anchor was skilled in his craft is proved by the fact that it is still serviceable after all these years. The bar is partly octagonal and of a type that is never seen now. Found Half Mile Off Shore The find yesterday was made about one-half mile from shore but the Magellan when it was wrecked was much further from shore. It is probable that wreckage from the boat may have carried the heavy anchor closer in shore. It is the first time that any wreckage from the schooner has been found, since the disaster which which occurred near a half century ago. The recalling of the wreck of the Magellan to the old timers will bring recollections of the Phoenix, Merrill, Jeanette, Irvin, Amelia, Lady Elgin, Seabird and others, all disasters in which the city was interested.

MANITOWOC Other names : none Official no. : 90465 Type at loss : schooner, wood, 3-mast, lumber Build info : 1868, Rand, Manitowoc, WI as a sidewheeler Specs : 210x29x13, 507g 479n Date of loss : 1900, Nov 10 Place of loss : on North Manitou Isl. Lake : Michigan Type of loss : (storm) Loss of life : ? Carrying : ? Detail : Ashore and wrecked. Converted to a barge in 1874 after a fire; her engine, formerly in the steamer MAY QUEEN, going into the steamer CHICAGO. The barge was later rebuilt to this schooner. Rebuilt 1879, 83 Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI __________________________________ Marine Disasters on the Western Lakes during 1869 By Capt. J. W Hall, Marine Reporter, Detroit April - Steamer Manitowoc, damaged by collision with schooner Jefferson, 4 miles from Chicago. June - Steamer Manitowoc, broke her cross-head off Port Washington, Lake Michigan. Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Sep 1873 - Steamer Manitowoc, damaged $300 in upper works by collision with schooner M. R. Goffe near Chicago.

MARIA Other names : none Official no. : (91096) Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : (1878, Milwaukee) Specs : (34x12x4, 9g 8n) Date of loss : 1895, Nov Place of loss : near Two Rivers, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none of 6 Carrying : railroad ties Detail : After she began to leak heavily in a storm, her crew was evacuated by local fishermen. The vessel blew ashore near Two Rivers and broke up. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

MARINETTE Other names : renamed JOHN B. BREYMANN before 1910 Official no. : 91857 Type at loss : propeller steam tug, wood Build info : 1885, Rand & Burger, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 71x18x10, 59g 40n Date of loss : 1926, Jun 28 Place of loss : at Toledo, OH Lake : Erie Type of loss : fire Loss of life : ? Carrying : none Detail : Burned to a total loss in the Toledo boneyard, just E of the Pennsy Railroad Bridge. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

JOSEPH G. MASTEN Other names : none Official no. : 13750 Type at loss : schooner, wood, 3-mast, bulk freight Build info : 1867, Quayle & Martin, Cleveland as a bark Specs : 186x34x13, 620g 590n Date of loss : 1897, Dec 4 Place of loss : N of Two Rivers, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : ? Carrying : coal Detail : Blown ashore and wrecked. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ___________________________ Marine casualties of 1871 Nov - Schooner J. G. Masten, struck and obstruction at Chicago and sprung aleak. Detroit Free Press, 17 Dec., 1872 Nov - Schooners J. Masten, Mary, J. McLeod, Mariner and Rutherford, all drove back to the canal, all more or less damaged in outfit.

EMILY B. MAXWELL Other names : none Official no. : C112362 Type at loss : schooner-barge, wood, bulk freight, 3-mast Build info : 1881, Hanson & Scove*, Manitowoc, WI as a schooner US#135536 Specs : 149x31x11, 362gc 327nc Date of loss : 1909, Aug 31 Place of loss : Cleveland harbor Lake : Erie Type of loss : storm Loss of life : (none) Carrying : ? Detail : Driven on the breakwater at Cleveland and torn to pieces. *builder also shown as Rand & Burger (Note: L. Falge in "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" (1910) has the ship built by Hanson and Scove. Sold Canadian, 1903 Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

J. LOOMIS MCLAREN Other names : none Official no. : 76331 Type at loss : schooner, wood, lumber Build info : 1882, Rand & Burger, Manitowoc, WI (Note: L. Falge in "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" (1910) has Hanson and Scove Specs : 132x29x10, 287g 272n Date of loss : 1894, May 18 Place of loss : off 27th St. N of downtown Chicago Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 1 Carrying : lumber Detail : Lost from tow of a tug in terrific gale when her towpost ripped out, spraying flying gear which killed her mate. She went into the shallows where police and bystanders rescued the balance of her crew. Broke up in place. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

LOUISA MCDONALD/LILY E. Other names : Built as LOUISA McDONALD, renamed in 1883. Also seen as LILLIE E., LILLY E. Official no. : 15872 Type at loss : schooner, wood, 3-mast Build info : 1869, J. Hanson, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 192g 182n Date of loss : 1883, Nov 11 (May 21 also given) Place of loss : off Manistee, MI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none of 8 Carrying : sacked oats Detail : In tow of the tug WILLIAMS and inbound to Manistee, she struck a bar in a heavy SW gale and limped in close to shore before sinking. Lifesaving Service saved her crew by breeches’ bouy. Bound Milwaukee for Manistee. Out of Grand Haven (or Manistee). By the 26th she had been stripped and a channel was dredged to her and she was refloated. As she was being towed away a storm blew up and she was scuttled to save her. On the 27th she was again raised during a lull in the weather, but had to be scutted again. She was raised for a third time on the 30th and towed in. Both times the Life-saving Service had to rescue those aboard, 28 in all. The whole venture had cost much more than the vessel and her cargo were worth, but she was eventually returned to service. Turned into a floating clubhouse for the South Shore Yacht Club, Milwaukee, in 1914, reported wrecked near Milwaukee in 1922. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI _________________ Detroit Free Press, Sat., 14 Dec, 1872 Sep - Schooner Louisa McDonald, sprung her mainmast in the gale on Lake Michigan. Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Jul 1873 - Schooner Louisa McDonald run into by a steamer at Chicago and lost jibboom, bowsprit, headgear besides other damages. ******** Manitowoc County Chronicle, Tuesday, October 19, 1880 Involved in a storm on Lake Michigan

LOUIS MEEKER Other names : also seen as LOUISE MEEKER, LOUIE MEEKER, LEWIS MEEKER, L. MEEKER Official no. : ? Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1872, Manitowoc Specs : ca. 400 t. Date of loss : 1872, Aug 28 Place of loss : near Big Sable Point, MI* Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 5 of 9 Carrying : 22,000 bu. wheat Detail : Capsized and foundered. Owned out of Chicago by Charles Lindgreen. *one source says she foundered with all hands off Middle Island, near Thunder Bay, Lake Huron. - newspapers report Lake Michigan Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ______________________ Detroit Free Press, Sat., 14 Dec, 1872 Disasters to Shipping on the Lakes in 1872 Aug - Schooner L. Meeker, capsized off Point Sauble, Lake Michigan, grain laden, vessel and cargo a total loss with five lives.

MENOMINEE Type: Steamer Launched: 1872, Burger Boat Co., Manitowoc Specs: ? _____________________ Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 May 1873 - Propeller Menominee, ashore at Bois Blanc, in the Straits, pulled off by tug Leviathan.

MERCHANT Other names : none Official no. : 90616 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1874, Larsen, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 79x19x7, 66g 63n Date of loss : 1904, Jun 28 Place of loss : near Sandusky, OH Lake : Erie Type of loss : (storm) Loss of life : ? Carrying : ? Detail : Stranded and wrecked, little detail. Document surrendered at Port Huron, 6/30/1905, annotated "wrecked near Sandusky, Ohio." Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

LIZZIE METZNER Other names : none Official no. : C116549 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1888, Burger & Burger, Manitowoc US#140950 Specs : 81x22x8 [77g 73n U.S. measure] Date of loss : 1916, Oct 17 Place of loss : at Oswego, NY Lake : Ontario Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none Carrying : light Detail : Caught in a 60mph NW gale, she was blown free of her dock at Oswego, dragged her anchors and went into the shallows on opposite side of the harbor. The Lifesaving Service took her crew off, but the vessel was a total loss. Owned by Capt Chauncey Daryaw of Kingston, Ont. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

MILTON Other names : none Official no. : 50395 Type at loss : scow-schooner, wood, bulk freight Build info : 1867, Ellsworth, Milwaukee Specs : 102x24x7, 131g 124n Date of loss : 1885, Sep 8 Place of loss : off Two Rivers Point, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 5 Carrying : wood Detail : Bound Ellison’s Bay, WI, for Milwaukee, she foundered in a heavy gale. Three brothers were among the lost. Owned and commanded bt Capt. Matheson, Milwaukee Driven ashore and thought to be a total loss, Oct 9, 1883, near Jacksonport, WI. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI _________________ Detroit Free Press, December 20, 1867 MARINE DISASTERS OF 1867 May - Schr W H Hinsdale and scow Milton, collided at Milwaukee. Damage to each $100.

MINNEHAHA Other names : none Official no. : 90584 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1872, Earnst, Manitowoc [builder also given as M. Omes] Specs : 71x18x7, 59g 56n Date of loss : 1898, Nov 7 Place of loss : off Sheboygan, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : (storm) Loss of life : ? Carrying : wood Detail : Reportedly missed the piers and drove ashore. May have been MINNEHAHA US#91020, below, which was still registered in 1902. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

MINNESOTA Other names : none Official no. : 16644 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1847, G. Weeks, Oswego Specs : 216g 205n Date of loss : 1873, mid-Nov Place of loss : N of Two Rivers, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : ? Carrying : lumber Detail : Driven ashore in a gale and became a total loss. Out of Chicago. Major repairs in 1862, 65 Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI _______________________ Detroit Free Press, December 19, 1866 Casualties on the Lakes the Past Season. August 1866 - Schooner Minnesota, cargo lumber, struck a rock in Detroit river and sunk; got up. Marine casualties of 1871 Sept - Propeller Buffalo lost her rudder, and schooner Minnesota her mainboom on Lake Michigan. Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Nov 1873 - Schooner Minnesota, another old stager of twenty-six years, ashore and total loss north of Two Rivers; cargo lumber.

MARGARET A. MUIR Detroit Free Press, 17 Dec., 1872 Nov - Schooner MARGARET A. MUIR, run into by Schooner STRONACH at Manitowoc, the former lost her bowsprit; Schooner Ashtabula sunk at the dock same time. Nov - Schooner Margaret A. Muir, sprung a leak at Milwaukee immediately after taking on her first cargo. Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Oct 1873 - Schooner Margaret Muir collides with barge Rutter at Chicago, losing a jibboom.

GEORGE MURRAY Other names : GEORGE Official no. : 85305 Type at loss : schooner, wood, bulk freight, 3-mast Build info : 1873, Rand & Burger, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 203x34x14, 790g 751n Date of loss : 1893, Oct 24 Place of loss : Pictured Rocks, near Munising, MI Lake : Superior Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none Carrying : coal Detail : Upbound, her masts were blown out by a quick-rising NW gale. Helpless, she was driven aground about 30 yards offshore at Pictured Rocks and torn to pieces. Bound Lake Erie for Marquette. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ******** Manitowoc County Chronicle, Tuesday, October 19, 1880 Involved in a storm on Lake Michigan

MUSKEGON Other names : none Official no. : 90466 Type at loss : sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight Build info : 1871, G.S. Rand, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 193x29x12, 618g 486n Date of loss : 1896, Sep 22 Place of loss : at drydock, Milwaukee Lake : Michigan Type of loss : fall Loss of life : none Carrying : none Detail : She fell a few feet off her blocks in drydock at the Milwaukee Dry Dock Co.. The hull broke in two and was damaged beyond repair. Dismantled in 1905. Goodrich Line steamer was worth $25,000. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

MYSTIC STAR Oswego Daily Palladium, Sat., Sept. 13, 1873 The Mystic Star A Handsome Schooner and a Good One. The new schooner Mystic Star, built at Manitowac by James Butler for Mr. Michael J. Cummings, of this city, arrived in port last night, grain laden, from Milwaukee on her maiden trip, having made the passage down in the quick time of ten days. The new schooner has been visited today by a number of gentlemen interested in marine matters and naval architecture who have admired her many fine points, her symmetry and finish and the really model cabin. The building of the Mystic Star was commenced May 1st, the contractor agreeing to have her ready by the first of September. She was launched on August 25th and sailed from Manitowoc for Milwaukee Saturday, the 30th, where she loaded the following Tuesday with 22,500 bushels of wheat for this port. The new schooner is one of the strongest ever built on the lakes, the best oak being used, and is thoroughly ironed. - She is of handsome model, with a graceful sheer, and when loaded to eleven feet, has a good side out of water. She has what is called the elliptic stern, becoming so popular in the West, with the run extending nearly to the main mast. She is a three and after, well sparred and carries a great spread of canvas. The cabin of the new schooner is a model of convenience and finish, is roomy and furnished elegantly. The rooms for the mates and steward are larger than any we have seen, while the dining room is large and well lighted and ventilated. The captain's rooms, parlor with bedroom off, are without but the handsomest and best arranged of any vessel on the lakes, and reflect credit upon the good taste and judgment of Captain John Griffin, who has superintended the building of the vessel. In the closet, through which the mizzen mast passes, are the toilet utensils for the captain, with the wash bowl in a receiver attached to the door. On the opposite side, in the kitchen, is a door opening in the same closet, thus allowing the cook to attend to it without entering the parlor. Instead of cumbering the room with a bureau the drawers are set in the side of the room with lockers off thus utilizing the space. The drawers and sliding desk are finished off with black walnut, adding to the beauty of the room. The bedroom of the captain is aft of the parlor, and instead being a small, cramped affair with a bunk or trundle bed, it is large and commodious, with a parlor bedstead. The floor is carpeted with Brussels, while the curtains are heavy "reps." The dining room has a large table of a new pattern, which folds up, and is superior to the old fashioned extension tables. The following are the definitions of the schooner: Length over all, 143 feet, 4 inches; depth of hold, 11 feet 6 inches; width 26 feet 2 inches. The Mystic Star is commanded by Captain John Griffin, the commodore of the Star fleet, an experienced seaman, who will keep her bottom free from sea weed and barnacles. We wish her a continuance of quick passages and high freights and hope that good luck may attend her to a green age.

NABOB Other names : built as schooner NABOB, renamed WAUKESHA before 1884 Official no. : 18175 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1862, Rand, Manitowoc (also given: Milwaukee) Specs : 138x27x12, 310g 295n Date of loss : 1896, Nov 7 Place of loss : off Muskegon, MI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 6 of 7 Carrying : ? Detail : Trying to ride out a gale at anchor, she waterlogged and foundered. major repairs in 1881 & 82 Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ____________________________ Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Jul 1873 - Schooner NABOB and bark Elizabeth Jones collided near the Straits, the former damaged, losing bowsprit and a portion of rail; latter damages of lesser importance. Jul 1873 - The bark Constitution; schooners Perew, Comanche, NABOB, Elide, D. A. Wells and Turner & Keller arrive at Chicago at about one and the same time damaged in sails and outfit, the result of a heavy gale on Lake Michigan. Jul 1873 - The Frank Parson and NABOB also damaged in outfit by same storm on Lake Michigan. ____________________________ The Butte Weekly Miner, (Butte, MT) Friday, November 13, 1896; pg. 5; Issue 45; col G Crew and Ship Go down Schooner Waukesha Failed to Ride Cut a Gale at Anchor Muskegon, Mich., Nov. 8-The schooner Waukesha broke up while trying to ride out the gale at anchor near here last night and only one survivor of the crew of seven has been rescued. He is still too weak to talk. The vessel had a load of salt and apples which was taken on at Manistee Saturday morning. At 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon she was sighted running with gale under a torn mail sail. Attempt was made to enter Muskegon harbor but the schooner drifted a mile south of the piers and then the anchor was dropped. She was riding three quarters of a mile off shore at dark. The engineer and fireman of the city pumping station watched the lights until 9 o'clock last night, when they disappeared. Shortly afterwards wreckage began coming in and to-day nothing can be seen of the lost boat above the water where she anchored. All night long the wreckage continued to come up on the beach and five bodies have been recovered. The names of the dead cannot be learned as nothing about the clothing will identify them. The surviving sailor was washed ashore unconscious and nothing can be learned from him. The Waukesha as one of the oldest of the fleet of "canalers" and true to all tradition she has taken almost her entire crew down with her in her last disaster. She was owned by H.H. Head of Chicago, and was formerly known as the Nabob. She was built in Manitomoc [sic] in 1864 and rated at 295 tons.

JAMES NAVAGH Other Names: none Build Info: 1857, Baker & Navagh, Oswego, NY Type at loss: schooner, wood, 2-mast Official No: 13304 Specs: 276 g Date of Loss: 1868, Oct 30 Type of Loss: storm Lake: Michigan Accident Place: N of Twin River Pt. Last Updated Cargo: 15,000 bu. wheat Loss of Life: 1 Detail: Bound Milwaukee for Oswego, she struck north of Twin River Pt. and broke in two, a total loss. The survivors of her crew spent a miserable night on her bowsprit and were later rescued by local residents in two Mackinaw boats from shore, but her cook later died of exposure. NAVAGH's rigging was later salvaged and used in the schooner LOUISA McDONALD (see LILY E.).Ashore and expected to break up on Middle Island, L. Huron, in October, 1864. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI _______________________ From the Detroit Free Press, 12 Nov, 1868 THE LOSS OF THE SCHOONER JAMES NAVAGH. - The last number of the Manitowoc Pilot contains the following highly interesting particulars of the loss of the schooner James Navagh on Two Rivers Point on the night of the 30th ult.: "The crew of the Navagh consisted of Captain Griffin, two mates, five seamen, and Mrs. Margaret Miles, a widow woman who was employed as cook. As soon as the vessel struck, her stern was carried away, taking her yawl boat with it, and her cabin commenced filling with water. The sea making a clean breach over her, the crew went into the forecastle and attempted to build a fire, but the forecastle commenced to fill, they were compelled to leave that also, the water coming in so rapidly that the last man out had to be pulled out with ropes. The vessel was now nearly submerged, and the unfortunate crew were compelled to crawl out upon the bowsprit and jibboom for ten (some of them twelve) hours, suffering everything but death. Every stitch of clothing upon them was saturated with water, the night was dark and intensely cold, and they were benumbed and nearly exhausted. After daybreak, finding that they were not observed from shore, it became evident that something must be done to obtain succor, or all would soon perish. Michael O'Brien, a sailor before the mast, of whose courage Capt. Griffin speaks in the highest terms of praise, volunteered to make the perilous attempt. He stripped off his clothing, and plunging into the lake, struck out bravely for the shore, which was about a quarter of a mile distant. A stiff current, setting down the lake, carried him about two miles to the northward before he succeeded in reaching land. When he did get ashore, he was so thoroughly chilled and exhausted that he had barely strength to crawl into an unoccupied shanty near at hand, where he covered himself with some hay until he regained a little warmth and strength, and then proceeded in quest of relief for his suffering friends. "In the meantime Mr. Joe Gagnon, of Two Rivers, had discovered the perilous situation of the crew of the wrecked vessel, and hastened to the village for assistance. As soon as possible, two Mackinaw boats were brought down to the beach, opposite the wreck. The first one was speedily manned, and started for the vessel. A tremendous sea was rolling in to the shore at the time, and the gale had not abated in violence; but no sense of personal danger, nor the certainty of death itself, could deter the noble hearted men from making the attempt to rescue the hapless people who were dying by inches in plain sight. The boat succeeded in reaching the vessel, and taking off the two mates, two of the seamen and Mrs. Miles, attempted to return to shore. This was about noon on Saturday [31st]. The boat was twice overturned by the waves in returning, the last time in the surf near the beach when those ashore waded out and rescued the crew and passengers. Mrs. Miles, who had endured every hardship during the night without a murmur, was utterly exhausted and chilled through, and half drowned by the capsizing of the boat. Dry clothing was wrapped about her, and she was placed in a wagon and driven to Two Rivers as rapidly as possible, but died immediately afterward. She was about fifty-five years of age, and the captain speaks of her as a worthy woman, who was the only support of a widowed daughter and three grandchildren, who live in Chicago. "Capt. Griffin and two seamen still remained on the ill-fated vessel. The other Mackinaw was launched into the seething waters, and brave hearts and sturdy arms were not wanting to complete the work so nobly begun. No mishap attended this second trip, which was made between two and three o'clock, and the three men were brought safely ashore. The officers and crew of the Navagh express their warmest gratitude to and admiration for the noble, self-sacrificing men, through whose superhuman exertions alone they were rescued from a terrible death. Two Rivers has reason to be proud of this heroic achievement of her citizens. The following is the roll of honor, as furnished us my Captain Griffin, being the names of the crews of the two boats, and those who were foremost in aiding them: Joseph Gagnon, Tim Harrington, Dennis Battee, Frank Leffawn, Godfray Leffawn, Alfred Leffawn, Frank St. Peter, Nezen Borneau, Teleafor St. Peter, Dolf Gokie."

NAVARINO Other names : none Official no. : 18703 Type at loss : propeller, wood, passenger & package freight Build info : 1870, G. Rand, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 184x35x13, 761 t. Date of loss : 1871, Oct 9 Place of loss : at Chicago Lake : Michigan Type of loss : fire Loss of life : none Carrying : ? Detail : This brand new vessel was lying at a dock when the city of Chicago was destroyed by its great fire. She tried to pull away, but the wind drawing into the fire held her against the dock. She burned to a total loss. Owned by Goodrich Line. Her machinery was later salvaged and used in the new prop MENOMINEE (later IOWA), which replaced NAVARINO. The remains of the hull may also have been revcoered and rebuilt to a barge or lighter. She was built with an "oscillating" engine, but it proved a failure and was removed in October of her first season, just after her trials. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ____________________________ Marine casualties of 1871 Oct - Propeller Navarino, destroyed by Chicago fire; total loss.

SIDNEY O. NEFF Other names : named M.C. & M.C. No. 2 from 1920 to 24, then returned to her original name Official no. : 116377 Type at loss : propeller, wood, bulk freight Build info : 1890, Burger, Manitowoc, WI as a schooner-barge Specs : 150x30x10, 347g Date of loss : 1940, Jun Place of loss : mouth of Menominee R., Menominee, MI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : hull failure Loss of life : none Carrying : ? Detail : She sprang a leak at the mouth of the river and sank, then was abandoned in place. The wreck is located .35 mi SE of Menominee S. pierhead light. Converted from schooner-barge to bulk freighter in 1896. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

EMMA L. NEILSON Other names : none often spelled NIELSON Official no. : 135665 Type at loss : schooner-barge, wood, bulk freight, 2-mast Build info : 1883, Hanson & Scove, Manitowoc, as a schooner Specs : 98x21x6, 90g 86n Date of loss : 1911, Jun 26 Place of loss : 12 mi E of Tawas Point Lake : Huron Type of loss : collision Loss of life : none? Carrying : light Detail : Upbound, she struck the deep-laden steel ore carrier WYANDOTTE and sank quickly. Her crew quickly abandoned in her boat, and were picked up by WYANDOTTE. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

NESHOTO Other names : also seen as NESHOTA Official no. : 18104 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1864, G.S. Rand, Two Rivers, WI Specs : 287 t. Date of loss : 1872, Sep 28 Place of loss : Sturgeon Point, North of Harrisville, MI Lake : Huron Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 5 of 7 Carrying : iron ore Detail : She foundered near the point in a powerful, but local, gale. For awhile it was thought that she could be recovered, but she was totally destroyed during the following winter. Homeport in 1869, Milwaukee Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI _______________________ Marine Disasters on the Western Lakes during 1869 By Capt. J. W Hall, Marine Reporter, Detroit May - Schooner Neshoto, lost centre-board, anchor and chain in gale on Lake Michigan. Nov - Schooner Neshoto, damaged in outfit on Lake Michigan. Detroit Free Press, Sat., 14 Dec, 1872 Disasters to Shipping on the Lakes in 1872 Sept - Schr Neshoto, foundered at the same locality, with the loss of five lives, cargo ore.

NEVADA Other names : none Official no. : 130218 Type at loss : propeller, wood, bulk freight Build info : 1882, Crosthwaite, Bay City Specs : 186x30x12, 634g 504n Date of loss : 1890, Nov 15 Place of loss : 20 mi NE of Two Rivers, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none Carrying : coal Detail : She sprang a leak in gale and began to founder. Her crew was taken off and the vessel taken in tow by the steamer MANCHESTER, which towed her board-on-board until she sank two hours later. Originally bound Sandusky for Sheboygan, WI. She was a total loss of about $55,000. Owned by Capt. Landgraff, Sandusky Date also given as Nov 8 Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ____________________ Marine casualties of 1871 April - Schooners J. C. Harrison and Nevada collide in Straits; former lost bowsprit, etc. April - Schooner Nevada, sustained serious damage and was towed to Milwaukee. Oct - Schooner S. P. Ely, lost maingaff, and schooner Nevada mainboom, on Lake Michigan. ********* STR. NEVADA IS PERILED IN STORM ON LAKE Capt. Hoxie Tells of Battle To Save Vessel That Was Built At Local Yards A story of a terrific battle which the steamer Nevada, Manitowoc built boat and now owned by the Pere Marquette, encountered in attempting its trip from Milwaukee to Ludington during the storm last week is revealed by Capt. Hoxie, who commands the vessel and who declares that in the thirty-three years of his experience on the lakes he has never faced a tougher blow. The big 230 foot liner attempted to make Manitowoc when it was forced to abandon its attempt to cross the lake after reaching Sheboygan, but with a shift of the wind, put back and finally crossed, taking double the time usual for the passage. The Nevada left Milwaukee at 8 o'clock Wednesday night in face of a big blow. "The wind was blowing about thirty miles from the west when we shoved off," said Capt. Hoxie. "We took our regular course up under the west banks, but when we got to Sheboygan I saw we could never make it on the east course out over the lake. "Capt. H.L. Sanders, the commodore of the line, was on the ship and I asked him if we should turn back or try for Manitowoc where we could if necessary, put in for shelter. We took the latter course. "By the time we reached Manitowoc early Thursday morning, the wind had veered into the North. I put out east. "Then came the battle. Towering waves lashed to a thin stinging fury by the howling gale rose around the ship, tossed her up and let her down like a baby on a teeter totter and broke pell mell across her deck. "The one big factor in our favor," says Capt. Sanders, "was that we had clear weather. I've seen as big a blow, I think, and in tougher weather. The sun is the biggest encour- agement in a gale like that." An hour out from Manitowoc and twenty foot billows of storm-tossed water were thumping down on the decks of the Nevada. Below in the cabins and lounges, twenty very sick passengers decided they never need to try the Atlantic. Among the (distorted line) most of them veterans of the lakes, there were some pale to greenish faces. Capt. Hoxie, an ice coated spectre on the bridge, decided to use diplomacy. He held his east course for another three-quarters of an hour and then dealt with the wind by turning northeast for another couple of hours to avoid the full blast down the lake. The wind was making sixty miles an hour by then, but quartering it the going was easier. In the middle of the morning the captain turned southeast for Ludington and took the blow on his other side. There was a six-inch coating of ice over most of the boat but nothing gave way. A final battle came in getting into Ludington. There the Nevada was halted more than an hour by the accumulation of ice blown into the harbor. "It was," says J.M. Cleveland, vice president and traffic manager of the lines, who was on the ship, "the most exciting but at the same time the most enjoyable lake trip I ever took." "In the old days in wooden ships I doubt if we could have made it", said Capt. Hoxie. "This was by far the worst storm of the season, and if there was a tougher one in my time I can't recall it. We thought the storms were worse in other years because we didn't have ships with the strength and stability of the Nevada in those days." The Nevada carried six hundred tons of freight including thirteen carloads of flour and this heavy ballast, the captain said, was a big offset to the raging waves. Manitowoc Herald News, March 11, 1929 p.2

J B NEWLAND Other names : none also seen as J. B. NEWLAN Official no. : 75366 Type at loss : schooner, wood, lumber Build info : 1870, G. Henderson, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 111x26x8, 158g 150n Date of loss : 1910, Sep 8 Place of loss : E of S. Manitou Isl. Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none of 6 Carrying : ? Detail : She went ashore in fog and blizzard conditions. Thought to be a total loss, she was later recovered by the U.S. reverue cutter TUSCARORA. Sold Canadian in 1914 [C#103820]. Registry closed in March, 1922, then towed out and scuttled off Kingston, Ont., in 1929, dropped from Canadian List of Shipping in 1932. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ____________________________ Detroit Free Press, Sat., 14 Dec, 1872 Sep - Seven vessels damaged in outfit, viz. schooners Hayden, Herald, J. B. Newland, M. M. Dunham,, Celts, Octavia and Magnolia on Lake Michigan. (. . .)igan and was towed to Milwaukee.

CHRISTINE NILSON Other names : also seen: CHRISTINE or CHRISTINA NEILSON, NILSSON & NEILSSON Official no. : 125293 Type at loss : schooner, wood Build info : 1871, Hanson & Scove, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 311g, 295n Date of loss : 1884, Oct (21) Place of loss : near Bailey's Harbor, WI, Door Peninsula Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : ? Carrying : ? Detail : Wrecked on a reef. Heavily damaged in the Chicago Fire, Oct, 1871. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

NORTH STAR Marine casualties of 1871 June - Steamer North Star, broke cylinder head in Green Bay. Aug - Schooner North Star, sprung aleak and arrives at Chicago. Sept - Schooner North Star, ashore at Sandy Creek, Lake Michigan; total loss. Detroit Free Press, 13 Dec., 1872 Disasters to Shipping on the Lakes in 1872 March - Schooner North Star, ashore near Racine, got off and repaired. June - Tug L. H. Boole, burst steam pipe near Pentwater and went ashore, with Schooner NORTH STAR in tow at the time; both got off. Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Nov 1873 - Schooner North Star, eighteen years on the lakes, stranded near Cheboygan (MI.) and reported gone up. ____________________________ From "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge 1911 vol. 1 Sorenson's shipyard, May 19, 1855, launched the second largest vessel yet built in Manitowoc, the NORTH STAR, a full rigged schooner registering 208 tons. She was built for M.F. Van Vleck and commanded by Henry Edwards, who was present at the laying of the cornerstone of Manitowoc.

NORTHWEST Other names : later renamed GREYHOUND(1886) Official no. : 18107 Type at loss : sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight Build info : 1867, G.S. Rand, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 241x34x10, 621g 314n* Date of loss : 1875 Place of loss : Ajax Isl, Green Bay Lake : Michigan Type of loss : fire Loss of life : ? Carrying : ? Detail : She burned with heavy damage and was declared a total loss, but was later recovered and rebuilt. Owned by the D & C line until 1885. She had the engine from the steamer PLANET. Converted to a barge in 1902, scrapped in 1906 Some sources say she was steel hulled in error. *Later measure, 1106 t. at the time of accident Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI _________________________________ Rig changed to barge, Detroit, MI, April 30, 1902 (478 gross - 478 net) Dismantled and converted to sand barge in 1901-1902; sank in 1904 in slip between Chene and Walter Campau Streets, Detroit, MI; raised on June 6, 1905. Abandoned and final enrollment surrendered at Detroit on June 29, 1907. Marine casualties of 1871 July - Bark Northwest and schooner Fame collide in the Straits; both damaged. Detroit Free Press, Sat., 14 Dec, 1872 Sep - Barks City of Milwaukee and Northwest, lost outfit on Lake Michigan. Detroit Free Press, 17 Dec., 1872 Nov - Bark Northwest, lost jibboom in Buffalo harbor. Nov - Stmr Northwest, cut through by ice and sunk in Green Bay, got up. Nov - Bark Northwest, cargo wheat, ashore at Port Hope, Lake Huron, got off badly damaged and laid up at Port Huron. (Note: the Bark Northwest may be another ship) Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 Jul 1873 - Steamer Northwest, wheelhouse damaged at Cleveland by a vessel's jibboom.

OCONTO Detroit Free Press, 17 Dec., 1872 Nov - Prop Oconto, on a reef in Green Bay, got off with slight damage. Detroit Free Press, 9 Dec, 1873 Marine Casualties of 1873 July 1873 - The steamer Oconto collided with the tug Ida at Chicago, making a big hole in the latter.

OLGA Other names : none Official no. : 155029 Type at loss : schooner-barge, wood Build info : 1881, Rand & Burger, Manitowoc, as a schooner Specs : 137x30x10, 308g 293n Date of loss : 1905, Nov 26 Place of loss : NE of Oscoda, MI Lake : Huron Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none Carrying : (lumber) Detail : She was lost from the tow of the steamer F.A. MEYERS during a gale and was abandoned by her crew when she began to sink. They were picked up by the steamer MAUNALOA, which was out looking for her own lost barge MARSALA. OLGA drifted about for several days, becoming a serious hazard to shipping, 'til she finally went ashore near Goderich, Ont., and broke up. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

ORION Other names : none Official no. : 18917 Type at loss : sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & freight Build info : 1866, G.S. Rand, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 185 ft., 496 t. Date of loss : 1870, Oct 16 Place of loss : harbor entrance at Grand Haven, MI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : none Carrying : freight & passengers Detail : Outbound from Grand Haven, she turned back after she was struck by the huge waves of a full gale. Her wheels were lifted out of water, throwing the vessel out of control and finally pushing her on a bar, where she was pounded to pieces. Homeport: Manitowoc, owned by Goodrich Transportation Co. Her engine and boiler came from the 1847 steamer MICHIGAN and went into the steamer MUSKEGON (qv) after this wreck. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ********* Marine casualties of 1871 Sept - Schooner Orion, cargo ore, ashore at Dover Bay; got off. Oct - Schooner Orion, cargo railroad iron, ashore near Chicago; lightered off.

PATHFINDER Other names : none Official no. : 20290 Type at loss : schooner, wood, 3-mast Build info : 1869, Campbell & Owen, Detroit Specs : 188x31, 634 gt 603nt Date of loss : 1886, Nov (17) Place of loss : near Two Rivers, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : ? Carrying : iron ore Detail : She went into the shallows, broke in two and sank so far from deep water that it was deemed impossible to refloat her. The steam barge JOHN H. PAULY removed her outfit and brought it to Milwaukee on the 20th. Major repairs in 1872,’79. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ********* Marine casualties of 1871 April - Schooner Pathfinder, damaged in outfit and lost yawl on Lake Huron.

GRACE PATTERSON Other names : none Official no. : 85634 Type at loss : propeller, wood, tug & frieghter Build info : 1880, J. Callister, Grand Haven Specs : 111 t. Date of loss : 1882, Mar 15 Place of loss : Two Rivers Point, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : stranded/fire Loss of life : none Carrying : lumber & lath Detail : Stranded, then caught fire and destroyed. Lifesavers rescued her crew. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI *********** Two Rivers news: Truman & Cooper of Manitowoc have contracted with the Capt. of the Grace Patterson to get his barge off the beach near the light house, where it has been since last March. They began work a few days ago, and should the present favorable weather continue some days longer, there is some prospect that the craft will be got off. Manitowoc Lake Shore Times, Tuesday, July 25, 1882 P.4

PENOBSCOT Other names : none Official no. : 150193 Type at loss : propeller, wood, bulk freight "sandsucker" Build info : 1880, Rand & Burger, Manitowoc as a schooner Specs : 131x27x9, (257g 244n)* Date of loss : 1925, Aug 19 Place of loss : off Marine City, MI Lake : St Clair R Type of loss : collision Loss of life : none Carrying : ? Detail : She collided with an unknown vessel and sank in shallow water. She was later removed from her perch, but deemed a constructive total loss. One source says she was destroyed by fire, but maybe scrapped by burning. *tonnage as a schooner Converted to a steambarge in 1908. Not officially abandoned until 1929. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI

PETOSKEY Other names : none Official no. : 100425 Type at loss : propeller, wood, passenger & package freight Build info : 1888, Burger & Burger, Manitowoc, WI Specs : 171x30x12, 771g 545n Date of loss : 1935, Dec 5 Place of loss : Sturgeon Bay, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : fire Loss of life : none Carrying : none Detail : Awaiting dismantling at a scrapyard when she caught fire and was destroyed. Several other vessel were lost in the blaze (see WAUKEGAN). Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ********** BOAT BUILT HERE 32 YEARS AGO, ON LAKES Petoskey Which Was Launched on Friday Still Going Under the caption "Bucking the Hoodoo," Walter Wittman of this city contributes an interesting article to the current issue of the Marine Advocate of Milwaukee, concerning the history of the old propellor Petosky, built in this city at the old Burger yards, thirty-two years ago and still in service a testimony to the stability of the early-day craft sent from Manitowoc. Mr. Wittman's article follows: "In perusing the old files of the Manitowoc Pilot the other day the writer met with the following items pertaining to the construction of the Steamer Petoskey, still plying the turbulent and semi-occasionally placid waters of old Lake Michigan. "April 19, 1888-The propeller Petosky will be launched tomorrow (Friday) at 3 p.m., at the Burger & Burger yards. This is one of the finest steamers built on Lake Michigan and there are two peculiarities connected with the launching. It has all its machinery in and will be ready for service as soon as its boilers can be filled. The second peculiarity is it's the first launch on a Friday at this place and probably the first ever made. Sailors, as a rule are superstitious and do not want to begin work on a Friday. "April 26, 1888-On Friday last the Steamer Petoskey was launched at the yards of Burger & Burger. The launch was witnessed by a large crowd who shivered about an hour in the chilly atmosphere. The boat slid so evenly and gracefully that to those abreast of her no movement was perceptible until she plunged from the ways. "This is one of the staunchest boats on the lakes and in proportion to its tonnage carries the heaviest machinery, and she needs the power for the work she is to do. She is to run from Chicago to Harbor Springs, the round trip being 658 miles. It is the purposed to make two round trips per week. The steamer is 170 feet keel, 180 feet over all, 30 feet beam and 735 gross tons. Her engine is a fore and aft compound; the low pressure cylinder is 40x36 and the high pressure cylinder 22x36. She is supplied with eighty six sleeping berths. Her speed, it is expected will be 13 miles per hour. She enters into competition with the Northern Michigan line. Was Launched on a Friday "The boat was built for Capt. Fred Seymour of Manistee. He, no doubt, had in mind a "test case" on this occasion-a tilt with the hoodoo theory that Friday was an unlucky day for maritime undertakings. Even the boat's keel was laid on a Friday. To make the venture as safe as possible, however, he had the boat built by the Burgers, who by this time had gained the enviable distinction of turning out none but good work. They followed the maxim that a chain is as strong as its weakest link, making it a point to look after ever link, and in this case, looking after ever bit of timber going into their work. That Capt. Seymour's confidence in the Burgers was not misplaced is borne out by the fact that after thirty-one years of service the steamer still bobs up serenely on schedule time wherever chartered, weathering many a gale that has sent other craft to Davy Jones' locker. "To bear out their hoodoo theory, sailors cite the tragic events in connection with the history of the steamer; namely, that the captain's wife died aboard the vessel while taking a trip with her husband; that the owner "passed to his reward" on a Friday, and some other incident to substantiate their belief in the hoodoo spirit. Whether or not these stories are based on facts or fiction the writer has no means of knowing, memory of them having dwindled into the dim haze of the past. Certain it is that the hoodoo's sway over the destinies of the craft was of but short duration. Like the Arab of the desert he must have wrapped himself in the folds of his tent to steal away in the silence of the night thus far not to appear again. "We do know, however, that this same Burger built boat, the Steamer Petoskey, now 32 years old, is still in the harness, working every day and in fine condition. Nor is the Petoskey a summer breeze pleasure craft. Even today she is sturdily plowing the ice fields of Lake Michigan, having recently been chartered by her owners, the Chicago & South Haven Transportation Co., to the Crosby line for the winter run between Milwaukee and Muskegon." Manitowoc Herald News, January 5, 1920 p.8

GUIDO PFISTER Other names : also seen as G. PFISTER Official no. : 85304 Type at loss : schooner, wood, 3-mast Build info : 1873, Hanson & Scove, Manitowoc Specs : 198x13, 694g 661n Date of loss : 1885, Oct 10 Place of loss : mouth of the Duluth Ship Canal Lake : Superior Type of loss : Towing mishap Loss of life : none Carrying : ? Detail : She was coasting into position behind a tug when the latter lost her towline and the PFISTER glided into the rocks, a total loss. Abandoned in place and later covered over with fill, her remains were dynamited when the present entrance piers were built. Major repair in 1881 Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ******** Manitowoc County Chronicle, Tuesday, October 19, 1880 Involved in a storm on Lake Michigan

PLANET Other names : none Official no. : none Type at loss : barge, wood Build info : 1855, Jas. Bushnell, Newport, MI as a sidewheel steamer Specs : 262x33x14, 994 t. Date of loss : 1872, Nov 7 Place of loss : off Two Rivers, WI Lake : Michigan Type of loss : storm Loss of life : 7 Carrying : 700,000 bd feet lumber Detail : She foundered in relatively shallow water off the Two Rivers pier. Hull maybe later recovered and completely rebuilt.(possibly as a barge by Hill, Marine City) and registered as the new barge NORTHWEST. Owned by Peshtigo Lumber Co. She sank near Eagle River, MI, Lake Superior, in Aug, 1862, with the loss of 35 lives. Major repairs in 1861, 62. She may have been built as a sidewheeler, converted to a prop shortly after. Sources: David D. Swayze, Lake Isabella, MI ______________________ Detroit Free Press, 17 Dec., 1872 Nov - Barge Planet, ashore and total loss at Bailey's Harbor, cargo lumber. (Note: also have sunk off Two Rivers Point, WI) _______________________ CAPT. GEORGE BUDGE, No. 534 Hanover street. He was born in Scotland in 1836. He first commenced his career as a sailor in the "HOPE," which traded between Scotland and Quebec. He came to this city in 1857, and has sailed on the lakes since. He has been a captain for eighteen years, and has commanded the schooners, "SYLPH," "PLYMOUTH ROCK," "HENRY FITZHUGH," and "PLANET." In the fall of 1859, he was wrecked on the "CITY OF TORONTO". He was married, in 1862, to Miss Elizabeth A. Jenkins, of Oswego, where she was born. They have four children, William, James, Mary and George.(Source:History of Milwaukee County, 1881)