MANITOWOC COUNTY PERSONAL SKETCHES

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RUDOLPH GRAF, D.D.S. This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.403-404. Dr. Rudolph Graf, who is successfully engaged in the practice of dentistry at Kiel, is a native of this county, born in Schleswig township, October 7, 1882. His father, Christian Graf, was a native of Germany, and at the age of fourteen came to America with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Christian Graf, locating in Wisconsin. There he engaged in the occupation of farming the remainder of his life. During the Civil war he served in Company H of the Fourteenth Wisconsin Regiment, under the command of Captain Montgomery. He enlisted in 1861 and served for fully three years, at the close of the war returning to Manitowoc county, where again he took up his farming interests. He was a member of the Lutheran church and belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic being a member of the post at Kiel. In early youth he wedded Miss Catherine Sinz, who was born in Sheboygan county, a daughter of Peter and Barbara Sinz. She is now living, having reached the age of sixty—seven, while her husband passed away on March 25, 1907, at the age of sixty-nine years. In their family were five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the youngest. The others are William and Arthur, who are engaged in farming; Albert, who is a dairyman near Kiel; and Oscar, who is now in the rural mail delivery service at Kiel. Rudolph Graf received his early education in the public schools of Kiel being graduated from the high school at that place when he was seventeen years of age. He then entered the normal school at Oshkosh, from which institution he was graduated, and for the following four years he followed the profession of school teaching in Sheboygan, Winnebago and Manitowoc counties. Subsequently he became a student in the dental department of the Marquette University and was graduated from that institution in the year 1909. He then came to Kiel, where he located for practice and has been actively engaged ever since. His superior skill and ability in the practical work of his profession have made him extremely successful, and he now has a well appointed office equipped with all the modern appliances known in the science of dentistry, the practical utility and value of which have been proven. He keeps abreast with the modern ideas in dental practice and his excellent work has secured him a liberal patronage. Dr. Graf is a valued member of various fraternal orders. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, being past consul of the camp, and to Kiel Lodge, No. 49, Improved Order of Redmen, and is sachem of his council. He has also joined the Independent 0rder of Odd Fellows and is a member of the state alumni of Marquette University and has ever kept in touch with the work which is being done in the dental profession today. He is a man of scholarly attainments and broad intellectuality, who by progressive steps has advanced until he is now one of the leading dentists of this county.

FRED GRAPENTIN This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.197. Fred Grapentin is a prosperous farmer and dairyman residing near Newton. He displays excellent business qualities, is active and energetic and carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. He is a native of Germany whence he and his brother August were brought to this country by their parents, Christian and Hannah Grapentin, in 1869. The family settled in Newton township, this county, where the father purchased land and cultivated a farm, erecting upon it excellent buildings. He still resides there, at the age of seventy-six, the mother having passed away in 1904, at the age of sixty-three. Fred Grapentin received his education in the district schools in the vicinity of his home and has continued to reside upon his father’s farm. This fine property, which he and his brother now operate, is equipped with all the improved appliances and devices of the model farm and dairy of the twentieth century. In addition to the cultivation of the fields Mr. Grapentin and his brother make a specialty of the dairying business, which yields annually a good financial return. In 1895 Mr. Grapentin wedded Miss Elvira Willard, a daughter of August Willard, whose family came from Germany and settled in the town of Newton, where Mrs. Grapentin was born. Mr. and Mrs. Grapentin have become the parents of five children, Charles, William, Delia, Hattie and Ida. Mr. Grapentin is greatly interested in all that pertains to the general progress and improvement of Manitowoc county but he has never cared for or sought political office. He and all his family are faithful members of the German Lutheran church. His life has been actuated by high principles and characterized by manly conduct and in the community where he has spent so many years of his life he enjoys that warm personal friendship and kindly esteem which are always given in recognition of genuine worth in an individual.

MICHAEL GRASSER (sent in by researcher/see contributors page) (co. mar. index v.6 pg.444) Name of husband: Michael Grasser b: Manitowoc co. Res: Sheboygan, Wis., farmer Father: Stephan Grasser Mother: Maria Fischbach Name of wife: Wilhelmine Christina Rodis (Rades) Birthplace: Town Schleswig, Manitowoc Co. Father: Wm. Rodis (Rades) Mother: Margretha Stahmer (?) Married: 20 Feb. 1898, Kiel, Manitowoc Co. Ceremony: Roman Catholic Ch. ---------- From the Sheboygan (Wis.) Press, Thursday, September 18, 1947 Mrs. Minnie Grasser Mrs. Minnie Grasser, 70, wife of Michael Grasser of Chicago, died at 11 a.m. Wednesday at St. Nicholas hospital following a lingering illness. She had been visiting in Sheboygan at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Gustav Waldau, 1601 N. Ninth street, when she was stricken and removed to the hospital. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Rades, the deceased was born Nov. 1, 1876, in the town of Schleswig, Manitowoc county, attended school at Rockville, and was married on Feb. 20, 1898, to Michael Grasser at Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic church, Kiel. Following their marriage, the couple resided on a farm in the town of Eaton and at New Holstein until 1901 when they moved to Marinette, Wis., where they lived until 1942. For the past five years they had made their home with two children in Chicago. Mrs. Grasser was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic church at Chicago, and was affiliated with the Christian Mothers' society at the parish. Survivors include her husband; four daughters, Mrs. Gustav (Erna) Waldan, Sheboygan, Mrs. Albert (Sylvia) Kearney, Cambridge, Mass., Mrs. Sigvald (Elmyra) Johnson, Chicago, and Mrs. Joseph (Leona) Pouliot, Waltham, Mass.; four sons, Raymond, Portsmouth, N.H., Cyrill, Chicago, Myron, Waltham, Mass., and Everist, Marinette; one sister, Mrs. Carl Koeser, Sheboygan Falls; a brother, William Rades, Kiel, and 17 grandchildren. One son, First Lt. Sylvanus Grasser, was killed in action with an infantry unit on New Guinea in April, 1944. Funeral services will be held at 8:30 a.m. Monday at the Ballhorn Funeral chapels and at 9 a.m. at Holy Name church. The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Philipp Dreis will officiate, and interment will be made on the family lot in Calvary cemetery. The body will lie in state at the funeral chapels from Saturday afternoon until the time of the services.

STEPHAN GRASSER The following photo is the church entry of their marriage followed by the marriage certificate from the church, followed by the researchers notes. All contributed by a researcher/see contributors page.

This is a copy of the marriage entry from Holy Name Church in Sheboygan. On it at the bottom Fr. Fusseder's signature. The marks after his name is probably the initials of his religious affiliation. The place name that Stephan Grasser came from on this document was written Runtenheim. The actual spelling for this town in France today is Rountzenheim (In the 1850's it was spelt Runtzenheim) and is located on the Rhein river directly north of Strasbourg. Also Stephan's mother's name is actually Anna Maria Saali. I believe you transcribed it as "Tally". The capital "s" looks somewhat like a capital "t". His wife's name is Maria "Fischbach". And Maria's father's name is Dominicus (this is Latin for Dominic).

LOUIS AND SOPHIA GREENWOOD

(it is uncertain if the Louis and Sophia is the same Louis from the article below) From the Two Rivers Manitowoc Co. Chronicle, Tue. June 16, 1891: Mr. Louis Greenwood, quite an aged man, came near meeting death last week in a peculiar manner. He was leading a cow by a rope. She became frightened and wanted to get away from him but the rope became entangled, forming a noose about his hand. He was dragged all over a 20 acre lot and over wood. He received some terrible bruises about the face and back but has recovered so as to be able to sit up.

MRS. FELIX GREENWOOD From the Two Rivers Reporter, Saturday, Dec. 20, 1913: OLD TIMERS - (photo with article) Having lived here sixty-five years, all her life, Mrs. Felix Greenwood is the oldest resident born at this place. In a little log house that once stood where Geimer's saloon is now located, she was born in September 1848. Her father was Anton Cayo who came here from Canada in 1847. He found employment for a time in the saw mill. Then he drove team, worked in Whitcomb's tannery and peeled tan bark. He died 38 years ago. Mrs. Greenwood has a good memory. She remembers that her father drove a team when she was three years of age. She also remembers an incident at that age when she ran and hid in the woods right near their hut, to escape a spanking from mother. During her sixty-five years of life in Two Rivers Mrs. Greenwood has not been away from the vicinity over a week altogether. A few years ago she was at Sheboygan to attend a funeral. Later she was at Kewaunee to attend a funeral and a few months ago she was at Milwaukee on business for one day.

WM. GREENWOOD From the Two Rivers Manitowoc County Chronicle, Tuesday, February 14, 1888: A fire broke out in Wm. Greenwood's house last evening about six o'clock. The Fire Department responded to the alarm with great promptness, but the fire was put out before the engine reached it. This is the second time the same house has been on fire within a few weeks. The fire this time was caused by a defective chimney.

PETER GREIS (contributed by family research/see contributors page) In early May 1847, the young couple and Peter's brother, Anton Gries sailed from La Havre, France aboard the brig Kate Hunter. The ship cleared the Port of New York on or about 19 Jun 1847. The first child's birth was probably registered at Seneca Falls, NY. Peter moved to Germantown, WI while Anton went to Meeme, Manitowoc Co., WI. Peter filed his intention to become citizen 23 Nov 1847 in Milwaukee County and his petition was granted 22 Mar 1855. While in Germantown, he worked as a blacksmith and possibly a farmer. The family moved to Meeme and bought 160 acres of land on 2 Dec 1850 for $275. This was the original homestead and remained in the Gries family until 1983.

FRANK GRESL
Frank Gresl Rosie Grall

EDWARD M. GRETZ This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.102-103. Edward M. Gretz, one of the enterprising and progressive young citizens of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, who is serving in the office of county clerk of Manitowoc county, is probably the youngest man to ever hold this important position. Born in Newton township, Manitowoc county, November 11, 1888, he is a son of Thomas and Pauline (Lepack) Gretz, natives of Germany who came to the United States in 1871, and settled in Newton township. Thomas Gretz followed farming during the active years of his life, but is now living in quiet retirement in the city of Manitowoc. He and his wife had a family of three Sons and five daughters. Edward M. Gretz received his early education in the country schools, and laying aside his text-books entered the employ of Schuette Brothers, with which concern he was connected at the time of his election to the office of county clerk, three days before he had reached his twenty-second birthday, in 1910. He has been active in the ranks of the democratic party, and is very well informed on matters of public interest, and has proved himself an efficient and satisfactory official. He is a member of the Catholic church.

JOHN GRETZ This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.327-328. John Gretz, who is now one of the popular merchants of St. Wendel, Manitowoc county, comes of sturdy German and Polish ancestry and he and his father were both brought up amid the scenes and surroundings of agricultural life. He has always been a valuable citizen wherever he has resided and when he identified himself with the business interests of St. Wendel that town gained a most desirable business man and citizen. John Gretz was born in Newton township, February 3, 1886, a son of Thomas Gretz. The father was a native of Germany and followed agricultural pursuits most of his life but is now living in the city of Manitowoc, where he is in the employ of the J. G. Johnson Ice Company, having come to that city in 1906. The mother, Mrs. Pauline (Lapek) Gretz, comes of Polish parentage and by her marriage to Thomas Gretz became the mother of eight children, of whom John Gretz, of this review, was the fourth in order of birth. John Gretz was given a good common—school education and in early years worked on the farm with his father. He removed to Manitowoc with the family and there remained until July, 1911, when he settled in St. Wendel and embarked in the mercantile business. He is conducting a flourishing trade and by giving careful attention to the wants of his patrons his business is constantly increasing. Mr. Gretz was married June 1, 1911, to Miss Teckla Hoffmann, a daughter of Peter Hoffmann, one of the very early settlers in the village of Centerville. The father is now engaged in the lumber business in that place and is one of the leading citizens of the town. He and his wife, Mrs. Mary (Dehringer) Hoffmann, are natives of Germany. Mr. Gretz is one of the bright young business men of St. Wendel and Centerville township and is displaying those talents and traits of character which make for successful business life and citizenship. He is active, optimistic, and, being always careful to please, he has become very popular with a large number of customers who frequent his place of business. He enjoys an excellent reputation and a wide acquaintance, and is held in high esteem by all who know him.

CHARLES GREVE "The Book Of Chicagoans: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men" By Albert Nelson Marquis, Copyright 1911 - Page 283 GREVE, Charles: born Mecklenburg, Germany, Aug. 16, 1847; son Henry and Helena (Lehmann) Greve; came to U.S. in childhood, residing at Manitowoc, Wis., from 1853 to 1880; ed. pub. schools of Manitowoc; married Manitowoc, Nov. 1867, Augusta Berndt; children: Helena, Serena, Augusta, Henry, Cora. Was engaged in operating planing mill, 1873-7, and, 1877-80, in farm machinery business in Manitowoc, as agt. for McCormick Harvester Co.; came to Chicago, 1880, and entered the Fair, of which E. J. Lehmann was founder and proprietor, as an employe, at $12.00 per week, and became mgr. of all of Mr. Lehmann's Interests in 1890, and since his death has been mgr. of the Estate of E. J. Lehmann, and sec. and treas. of The Fair. Mem. Chicago Real Estate Board, Cook Co. Real Estate Board. Republican. Mem. Odd Fellows, K.P., Sons of Herrmann. Clubs: Chicago Athletic, Press, South Shore Country. Recreations: reading, motoring, golf, travel. Residence: 3729 Lake Av. Office: 28 W. Monroe Street.

HENRY GREVE From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 527 Henry Greve, planing mill and sash factory, Manitowoc, was born Feb. 29, 1828, in Mecklenburg, Germany. At the age of fourteen years, he began to learn the trade of joiner and furniture maker. He followed this trade until 1853, when he emigrated to New York, working at his trade for two years in that city. In 1855, he came to Manitowoc and in 1866 he started a furniture business, which he conducted for five years. In 1868 he started a planing mill, and in 1879 added to his business the manufacture of staves, all of which he is now successfully conducting. He enlisted in 1862, Company F, 26th Wis. Inf., and was wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., in 1863, and was discharged on account of physical inability. He has been a member of the Board of Trustees and is an Alderman and member of the County Board and has been City Assessor, besides having held various other offices. In 1853, he married Miss Helene Lehmann, of Mecklenberg. They have one son.

CARL GRIEP FAMILY

Standing left to right: Fred Griep, Gretchen Griep, August Griep, Will Griep

Sitting left to right: Elizabeth Griep, Carl Griep, Carl Griep, Hattie Griep Kahrs

CLARENCE E. GRIDLEY From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p 527 Clarence E. Gridley, dentist, Manitowoc City, was born in Rochester, N. Y., May 7, 1856; he left Rochester in 1872, and traveled through the West in the practice of his profession, having learned the same in Rochester, beginning in 1870 and finishing in Detroit, Mich. He also attended the Detroit Medical College. He went from the latter city to Winona, Minnesota, and practiced his profession for a short time, and from there went to Manitowoc, Sept. 24, 1877, and began business in company with Mr. S. N. Buck, and at the end of one year, Mr. Gridley bought the interest. He was married in Manitowoc, Nov. 7, 1878, to Miss Lillian H. Randall, of Appleton; she was born in the latter city, Aug. 31, 1861. They lost one son, Sept. 4, 1880. They now have an infant son.

HARRISON EDWARD GRIDLEY
  

Harrison Edward Gridley

FRED T. GRIMM This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.321-322. Fred T. Grimm, a prosperous farmer owning one hundred acres on section 27, Maple Grove township, and one hundred and forty acres on section 22, was born in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, September 5, 1849. He is a son of Henry L. and Elizabeth (Schneider) Grimm, natives of Germany. They came to the United States in 1848, settling in Sheboygan county, where they farmed until 1868, when they went to Iowa. That state continued to be their home until 1889, when they moved to the upper peninsula of Michigan and there spent two years. Following that they moved to Taylor county, Wisconsin, where the father died in June, 1892. His widow later went to Oregon and there she passed away, in 1895. Fred T. Grimm was the fourth born in a family of ten children and remained with his parents until twenty-six years old. At that time he commenced farming for himself in Iowa on eighty acres of land, remaining there five years. He then came to Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, buying his present farm. About seventy-five acres of this is under the plow and is in a high state of cultivation. The fences are all barbed wire, and the premises kept in first-class condition. He manufactures dairy products, milking twenty-two cows of graded stock. He breeds to Percheron and Clyde horses, and raises hay, grain and clover seed. The basement of his barn is forty-four by sixty-eight feet, and was built in 1896. The floor of this is of cement and modern appliances have been put in as they were required. The water supply for all purposes comes from open wells. In 1879, Fred T. Grimm was married to Emma Fischer, who was born March 10, 1855, the second child in a family of thirteen children. She is a daughter of Henry and Augusta (Oswold) Fischer, natives of Germany who came to the United States about 1851, settling in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin. The father died in 1910, but his widow survives. Mr. and Mrs. Grimm have five children: Otto living in Reedsville; Adolph, Reinhardt and Ambrose at home; and Herman, who was the eldest and died in childhood. The family belong to the German Lutheran church at Reedsville of which Mr. Grimm has been a trustee for six years. He is a modern farmer who thoroughly appreciates the value of scientific methods, and his premises and farm show the results of his intelligent care.

MARY GRIMM

Mary Grimm taken at Two Rivers in 1909 at age 20 Compliments of Gary Omernick

CHARLES A. GROFFMAN This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.651-652. Charles A. Groffman, a prominent citizen of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where he is now engaged in a mercantile business, has been identified with the industrial and official life of this city for a number of years, and was born here October 16, 1867, a son of George H. and Fredericka (Pieritz) Groffman. George H. Groffman was born in Germany in 1821, and at the age of sixteen years left home and went to London, coming from that city to the United States after a short period. He first located in Watertown, Wisconsin, where he was married to Fredericka Pieritz, who was born in Germany and came to the United States with her father, Fred Pieritz, locating in Watertown. George H. Groffman was a mason by trade, and about 1840 he moved to Manitowoc Rapids, where he engaged extensively in building, erecting one of the first brick houses at that place, and later came to Manitowoc and established the first brickyard in the city and also engaged in the grocery business. During the latter years of his life he was an invalid, his sickness being the direct result of being wrecked in the "Seabird" off Milwaukee in midwinter, he being one of those who went in an open boat to seek assistance for his comrades. In politics a democrat, he served as assessor of Manitowoc in 1874. On March 9, 1877, he died, his widow surviving until 1889. They had nine children: Elizabeth, who married Henry Redden, a resident of Tennessee; William, a merchant of Berlin, Wisconsin; Martha, who married J. F. Koch, of Berlin; George, chief of police of Manitowoc; Alvina, who married Alexander Dugatt, of Berlin; Emma and Lily, who are deceased; Charles A.; and Alvin, living in Washington. Charles A. Groffman received a public and high school education, and for some time thereafter was engaged as a clerk in a drug store, after which he opened a mercantile establishment of his own and has continued to conduct it to the present time. He has been prominent in political matters, serving as a member of the county board for six years and as mayor of Manitowoc from 1907 to 1911. Fraternally he is a member of the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Royal League, and he has been president of the local aerie of the Eagles. On October 21, Mr. Groffman was married to Anna Krundick, of Manitowoc, daughter of Daniel and Mary Krundick. Mr. and Mrs. Groffman have one son and two daughters.

GEORGE GROFFMAN This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.53-54. George Groffman, chief of the police department of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, is a native of that city, born May 13, 1858, a son of George H. and Fredericka (Pieritz) Groffman. George H. Groffman was born in Germany in 1821, and at the age of sixteen years left home and went to London, from whence, after a short stay, he came to the United States. He first located in Watertown, Wisconsin, where he was married to Fredericka Pieritz, who was born in Germany and came to Watertown with her father, Fred Pieritz, as a girl. George H. Groffman was a mason by trade and moved to Manitowoc Rapids about 1840, where he built one of the first brick houses in Manitowoc county and engaged extensively in the building business. Eventually he came to Manitowoc and established the first brickyard in this city, being also engaged in the grocery business for a long period. During the latter years of his life he was an invalid, his disability caused by exposure during the wreck of the steamer Seabird, near Milwaukee, in midwinter, Mr. Groffman having been one of those who manned a boat to go to seek assistance. He was a democrat in politics, and served as assessor of Manitowoc during 1874. His death occurred March 9, 1877, his widow surviving until 1889. They were the parents of the following children: Elizabeth, who married Henry Reddeau, a resident of Tennessee; William, a merchant of Berlin, Wisconsin; Martha, who married J. F. Koch, of Berlin, Wisconsin; George; Alvina, who married Alexander Dugatt, of Berlin, Wisconsin; Emma and Lily, who are deceased; Charles A., who is engaged in the drug business; and Alvin, living in Washington. George Groffman received a public-school education, and learned the masons trade from his father. He worked at various lines until 1886, when he engaged in the wrecking business and continued therein for six years, after which for fifteen years he was engaged in constructing waterworks, at the same time owning an interest in the Snow Flake Laundry. He helped to construct the waterworks at Manitowoc; at Kingston, Berlin, Waterloo and Belleville, Canada; Jackson, Mississippi; and Butte, Montana, and then traveled for one year as general utility man, all over the United States. On July 15, 1908, Mr. Groffman was appointed chief of police of Manitowoc, and he has filled that position very satisfactorily to the present time. On September 20, 1898, Mr. Groffman was married to Lulu Noies, of Clarks Mills, Wisconsin, daughter of William P. Noies, who is now living in Amherst, Wisconsin, and who was one of the first settlers of Manitowoc. He married Emma Tucker, daughter of Dr. Tucker, a pioneer physician of Manitowoc county. Three children have been born to Chief and Mrs. Groffman, Lulu, Alice and George, Jr. Mr. Groffman is a republican in politics, and is a member of the lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity.

EMIL GROSSHUESCH This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.208-209. Emil Grosshuesch is numbered among the native sons of Newton township, who still reside within its borders. He was born January 27, 1875, the son of William and Margaret (Newhaus) Grosshuesch. William Grosshuesch was a native of Germany and was brought to America in 1849, when he was four years of age by his father, Henry Grosshuesch, who settled in the town of Newton, where he resided until his death, about 1875. Margaret (Newhaus) Grosshuesch was also a native of Germany and was brought to America at the age of three years by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Newhaus, who located in Newton. William Grosshuesch became a very prominent and well-to-do farmer in Newton township and served for a time as supervisor of the township. He passed away July 9, 1911, but his wife is yet living, having reached the age of sixty-six. In their family were thirteen children, eleven of whom survive. Emil Grosshuesch had limited advantages for an early education. He attended the district school for a short time, but being the eldest son of a large family, the duties of the farm often kept him at home. He worked for his father until the age of twenty-six, when he purchased of his father the home in which he now lives. He has made many improvements on this place, rebuilding and adding to the house, and has erected an excellent barn. He engages extensively in dairying and general farming and is one of the prosperous and scientific farmers of the county. In 1901 Mr. Grosshuesch wedded Miss Clara Mathias, a daughter of Henry and Mary Mathias. Her grandfather, Henry Mathias, Sr., was one of the pioneer settlers of this county. Mr. and Mrs. Grosshuesch have become the parents of one son, Elmer, born February 5, 1902. Mr. Grosshuesch is counted as one of the prominent agriculturists of the community in which he has passed his entire time. He is interested in all that pertains to progressive public movements, although he has always shunned public office, and both in citizenship and in private life he has manifested the sterling traits of character which everywhere command respect and regard. Both he and Mrs. Grosshuesch are members of the Reformed church of Newton.

AUGUST GROSSTUECK Soldiers’ And Citizens’ Album Biographical Record Grand Army Of The Republic 1888 Page 488: AUGUST GROSSTUECK, of Manitowoc, Wis., member of G.A.R. Post No. 18, was born Feb. 16, 1834, in the kingdom of Saxe Weimar, Germany. He came to America in 1853 and after passing five years in various places, he located in Manitowoc which has since been his place of abode. He enlisted Sept. 6, 1861, in Company B, 9th Wisconsin Infantry, which was recruited wholly from the German population of Wisconsin. The first service to which the regiment was assigned was located in Kansas and they marched 160 miles to Fort Scott, and his first service was in July, when he was engaged in the dispersion of a force of rebel Indians. He was engaged in several similar encounters and was in all the heavy marches of the regiment, including nearly 400 miles, after which, the army of the frontier was re-organized and he fought at Newtonia, Camden, Jenkin’s Ferry, Pea Ridge, Huntsville, Prairie Grove, Cane Hill and Spoonsville. The latter engagement was fought in April, 1863. April 30, 1864, Mr. Grosstueck was made captain by brevet for bravery at Jenkins’ Ferry. Previous to that he was acting as sergeant and he was mustered out Dec. 3, 1864, with the other non-veterans of the regiment, his term of service having expired. He was married in 1853 to Catherine Kennedy , and they have two sons and two daughters. (See sketch of Henry Buhse, a comrade of Mr. Grosstueck, whose experiences were similar.) (sent in by researcher/see contributors page)

FREDERICK GROTEGUT From the Postville Herald, Postville, Allamakee Co. Iowa, June 12, 1930 Obituary. Frederick Grotegut was born in Manitowoc, Wis., on April 9, 1859, and there under parental care he received his secular and spiritual education. At the age of 26 he moved to the state of Iowa with his parents and settled on a farm in Winneshiek county, near Frankville, the place being still known as the Grotegut farm. On March 23, 1887, Mr. Grotegut was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Stock. This union was blessed with twelve children, five sons and seven daughters. Being blessed with health and strength, Mr. and Mrs. Grotegut labored on their farm until 1917 when they moved to Frankville to live in retirement. Mr. Grotegut passed away after a year's illness in the early hours of Thursday, June 5, at his home in Frankville, having attained the age of 71 years, one month and 27 days. He is survived by his widow, his son, John, of Frankville township, Simon and Albert of Ludlow [Allamakee Co.], his daughters, Mrs. Theodore Henning of Ludlow, Mrs. Elmer Herman of Union Prairie [Allamakee Co.], Mrs. John Lundt and Mrs. Victor Heins of Post twoenship [Allamakee Co.], also twenty-one grand-children, two brothers, Simon and Henry of Waukon and six sisters, Mrs. Henry Bieberman of Timothy, Wis., Mrs. Henry Hager of Frankville, Mrs. Fred Becker, Sr., of Waukon, mrs. F.W. Bechtel of Frankville, Mrs. W.T. Snitker of Ludlow, Mrs. Lydia Thoma in the hospital at Oakdale. He is also survived by a host of other relatives and friends who mourn his passing. Six granddaughters acted as flower girls at the funeral services. Mr. Grotegut was a most faithful member of the Salem congregation since its organization in 1895 and a faithful helper in the building of the old frame church in said year and again when the brick structure was erected in 1915. He was a cheerful giver and helper in all the affairs of the church during all these years. Funeral services were held on Sunday afternoon at two o'clock with sermons both in English and German by his pastor, the Rev. DeBuhr assisted by the Rev. Closterburg of the Bethlehem congregation and the Rev. Uhden of the Zalmoni church. Two brothers and four sisters-in-law acted as pall bearers. Interment was in the cemetery close by. The attendance at the funeral was probably the largest ever held here, all standing room being taken and it was estimated fully 100 persons were standing out of doors. The ideal weather brought people from far and near to pay their last respects to the deceased

HENRY GROTH This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.642. Henry Groth, cashier of the German American Bank of Manitowoc, one of the well known financial institutions of Manitowoc county, is a native of this county, having been born in Newton township, October 9, 1869, a son of Charles and Fredericka Groth, natives of Germany. The parents came to the United States in 1853 and settled on wild land in Manitowoc county, where Mr. Groth died in 1871. His widow still survives and makes her home in Newton township. They had a family of nine children, of whom two are deceased. Henry Groth received a common-school education, and then attended the Oshkosh Normal School, after which he engaged in teaching for two years. Later he entered the Milwaukee Normal School, from which he was graduated in 1897, and after teaching for seven more years accepted the position of assistant cashier with the German American Bank of Manitowoc, and was made cashier March 1, 1911. The German American Bank was organized in September, 1900, the first officers being: L. D. Moses, president; Leander Choate, vice president; and F. F. Zentner, cashier. It had a capitalization of one hundred thousand dollars. Two years later the capitalization was reduced to twenty thousand dollars and the following officers were elected in February, 1911: Charles Esch, president; Charles Hacker, vice president; and Henry Groth, cashier. The bank owns its own building at the corner of Jay and Ninth streets. In 1899 Mr. Groth was married to Ida Schmitz, who was born in Newton township, Manitowoc county. She died April 1, 1903, leaving two children. On July 2, 1904, Mr. Groth was united in marriage with Hulda Schmitz, also of Newton township, and one child has been born to this union. Mr. Groth is independent in political matters, except in national affairs, when he votes the democratic ticket. He is a member of the school and library boards, and is socially connected with the Elks.
Henry Groth

CHARLES GRUHLE This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.27-28. Charles Gruhle, who for more than eleven years has been manager of the Oriental Mills at Manitowoc, of which he is also one of the stockholders, was born in this city on the 16th of November, 1867, and is a son of William and Cecelia Gruhle. The father was one of the pioneer settlers here and had the added distinction of being the first operating miller of Manitowoc. He was for many years employed in the Clipper City mill and was excused from going to war when drafted into the service on account of his trade. He was a very capable man in his line and possessed the fine sterling qualities that enabled him to win and retain the friendship of all with whom he came in contact. He passed away in 1897 at the age of sixty-nine years and was buried in the cemetery at Kiel, Wisconsin. The mother, who is buried in the Catholic cemetery at Manitowoc, died in 1871. The education of Charles Gruhle was pursued in the public schools of this city until he had attained the age of fourteen years. He then laid aside his textbooks and entered the mill where his father was employed, to learn the trade, having decided to make this his vocation. At the end of a year he became an apprentice in a mill at Two Rivers, and at the expiration of his period of service in 1885, returned to Manitowoc, to become miller in the Oriental Mills. Mr. Gruhle was not only thoroughly familiar with every detail of his trade, in which capacity he served most efficiently, but he proved to he a very capable business man and upon attaining his majority he was promoted to the position of superintendent. He has now discharged the duties of this position for more than twenty years, and during that time he has become one of the stockholders of the company, in the development of whose interests he has so prominently figured. Since he became associated with Mr. Schuette in the operation of this enterprise it has become recognized as one of the best managed and most thriving industries of the city. They have a very good plant, while their equipment is modern and their operators are skilled and capable representatives of the trade. Their products are uni and Cecelia Gruhle. The father was one of the pioneer settlers here and had the added distinction of being the first operating miller of Manitowoc. He was for many years employed in the Clipper City mill and was excused from going to war when drafted into the service on account of his trade. He was a very capable man in his line and possessed the fine sterling qualities that enabled him to win and retain the friendship of all with whom he came in contact. He passed away in 1897 at the age of sixty-nine years and was buried in the cemetery at Kiel, Wisconsin. The mother, who is buried in the Catholic cemetery at Manitowoc, died in 1871. The education of Charles Gruhle was pursued in the public schools of this city until he had attained the age of fourteen years. He then laid aside his textbooks and entered the mill where his father was employed, to learn the trade, having decided to make this his vocation. At the end of a year he became an apprentice in a mill at Two Rivers, and at the expiration of his period of service in 1885, returned to Manitowoc, to become miller in the Oriental Mills. Mr. Gruhle was not only thoroughly familiar with every detail of his trade, in which capacity he served most efficiently, but he proved to he a very capable business man and upon attaining his majority he was promoted to the position of superintendent. He has now discharged the duties of this position for more than twenty years, and during that time he has become one of the stockholders of the company, in the development of whose interests he has so prominently figured. Since he became associated with Mr. Schuette in the operation of this enterprise it has become recognized as one of the best managed and most thriving industries of the city. They have a very good plant, while their equipment is modern and their operators are skilled and capable representatives of the trade. Their products are uniform in quality and exactly as represented, which fact has been of inestimable value in enabling them to build up a permanent patronage. Whitewater, this state, was the scene of Mr. Gruhle's marriage on the 19th of August, 1901, to Miss Maud Fraser, a daughter of Mrs. May Fraser, and they have become the parents of one child, Dorothea M., who is now attending school. The family home is located at 1114 South Seventh street, where Mr. Gruhle erected a very pleasant residence in 1900. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Royal League, and he also holds membership in a number of social clubs. In politics he is a republican, and his townsmen have recognized his worth and ability as a citizen by calling him to public office at various times. At the present time he is discharging the duties of fire and police commissioner, and on several occasions he has represented his ward in the city council. During the long period of his connection with the business interests of Manitowoc, those who have had dealings with Mr. Gruhle have always found him to be thoroughly trustworthy and reliable, while in the discharge of his official duties he has manifested a rare sense of conscientious obligation to the public, to whose efforts he has been indebted for the honor thus paid him as a citizen.

CHRISTIAN GUETSCHOW This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.197-198. Christian Guetschow since 1883 has owned and operated in Newton township the old homestead on which he was born, November 20, 1857. His parents, William and Mary Guetschow, are both natives of Germany and came to the United States in 1852, soon after their marriage. They came direct to Manitowoc county, where the father was employed on a farm for two years and then purchased the tract of land on which the subject of this sketch now lives. Here he erected a log cabin in which his family resided for several years and in which his children were all born. He cleared and cultivated the land and made his home there until his death, in 1887, when he passed away at the age of sixty-seven. The mother passed away January 17, 1912, at the advanced age of eighty-four years. In their family were eleven children, five of whom are yet living. Christian Guetschow obtained his education in the district schools of the neighborhood and grew to manhood on his father’s farm. He has always been associated with work on his home place and shortly before his father’s death he purchased the same and has since operated it. He has made many improvements upon it, erecting an excellent house and barns, and has brought the land to a high state of cultivation. In 1883 he wedded Miss Wilhelmina Moss, who is a native of Manitowoc county and a daughter of Carl Moss, who came from Germany and settled in this county but later removed to Minnesota, where he now lives. Mr. and Mrs. Guetschow have become the parents of one son, John, born January 29, 1884. Mr. Guetschoav has always been actively interested in the welfare of the community but he has never cared for political office. Both he and Mrs. Guetschow are earnest and faithful members of the German Lutheran church. Having resided on his present farm all his life—a period of over half a century—Mr. Guetschow has been closely associated with the development of this county and at all times he has been ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any movement which was calculated for the benefit of the public. His life has been one of continuous activity, in which has been accorded due recognition of labor, and today he is numbered among the substantial citizens of his community.

GILBERT and OLE GULIKSON This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.458-459. Gilbert and Ole Gulikson, who are engaged in general farming and stock- raising in Liberty township, Manitowoc county, were both born on the farm where they now reside, Gilbert's birth having occurred on New Years' day, 1868, and that of Ole on November 5, 1877. They are sons of August and Berit Oleson (Berge) Gulikson, both of whom were born in Valders, Norway. When he was a lad of eleven years the father emigrated to the United States with an uncle, Helge Gulbrandson, who came directly to this county, settling on a tract of government land in Liberty township. There August Gulikson remained until he had attained his sixteenth year, assisting his uncle and other settlers in the vicinity in the cultivation of their farms. At the expiration of that period he obtained employment with a fisherman at Manitowoc, remaining in his service for two years. As he did not feel that he cared to follow this for a permanent vocation he subsequently returned to Liberty township and once more engaged in agricultural pursuits. About two years after his arrival in this country, he was followed by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gulik Gulbrandson, who had the misfortune to be among the passengers on a vessel that collided with another boat on Lake Erie. It was a terrible disaster, three hundred lives being lost, and although Mr. and Mrs. Gulbrandson were fortunate enough to escape uninjured they lost all of their money and personal effects. Upon their arrival at Manitowoc they were assisted by their friends, who provided them with clothing and the necessities of life and also aided them financially. They first located at Two Rivers, where Mr. Gulbrandson, who was a blacksmith, established a shop and followed his trade until 1857, when he came to this township and purchased the farm owned by his grandson, Gilbert Gulikson. Here he resided until his death, which occurred in 1890, at the age of eighty-seven years. The maternal grandfather of our subjects was Ole Gulikson Berge, who passed his life in Valders, Norway, where he died. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. August Gulikson, as follows: Anna; Gilbert and Iver, who are twins; Gusta and Ole Iver removed to Iowa and there engaged in farming for twenty years, but has since returned to Manitowoc county, where he has acquired some land. Anna married Halver Tostenson and they also settled in Iowa, where she lived until the death of her husband when she returned to this county. Gusta makes her home in North Dakota, where she is engaged in teaching. Gilbert and Ole Gulikson were educated in the district schools in the vicinity of their home, and while engaged in the mastery of the common branches they were assisting their father with the work of the fields and the care of the stock. They laid aside their text—books while still in their early youth, and at the age of seventeen Gilbert began to learn the carpenters trade, which he followed for six years, while Ole learned the mason's trade. When he was twenty—three, Gilbert gave up his trade and rented his grandfather's farm and has ever since devoted his entire time and attention to agricultural pursuits. He met with success in his undertakings and in 1905 bought the place, which has now been in the the possession of the family for over half a century. Neither he nor his brother Ole have ever married and both are living at home. The Gulikson family all hold membership in the Norwegman Lutheran church, of which Gilbert has been trustee and treasurer for some years. Neither of the brothers has ever aspired to political honors or the emoluments of office, but the elder was at one time clerk of the school district. They are both enterprising men of thrifty habits and are now in very comfortable circumstances, Gilbert Gulikson being one of the stockholders in the Liberty and Newton Telephone company, of which he is the president. They are worthy representatives of an honored pioneer family of Liberty township and are held in high regard by their many friends.

STEPHEN GUNDERSON

Stephen and Anna Married June 22, 1892 The Gunderson's started a dairy bringing pasteurizing and bottling of milk to Manitowoc County. - Photo compliments of Gary Omernick

FRANK GUSE, JR. This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.27-28. Frank Guse, Jr., who since 1904, has been engaged in the lumber business in Manitowoc, was born in this city on July 28, 1881, the son of Frank J., Sr., and Annie Guse. Frank J. Guse, Sr., was brought from Germany to this country by his parents in 1856, when he was only three years of age. He was reared and educated here and previous to establishing the business with which the subject of this sketch is now associated he was connected with a planing mill which was operated under the firm name of Biegel & Guse. He sold his interest in this mill to the Christ Schoch Lumber Company. He was a very successful business man. His wife passed away in Manitowoc and is buried in Evergreen cemetery. Frank Guse, Jr., received his education in Manitowoc. leaving high school in 1899. He then attended the Wisconsin Business College for a short time, after which he became an employe in his father’s mill and remained there until he and his father established their present business. The firm deals in lumber, sash and door materials, and the establishment is located at 912 Commercial street. From the very start Mr. Guse has been successful in his work and the company is now carrying on an extensive business. In Manitowoc, on October 4, 1904, Mr. Guse was married to Miss Laura Daeke, a daughter of Christ Daeke, who was one of the earlier settlers here and was also one of the first harness makers of Manitowoc. He now lives retired in this city. To Mr. and Mrs. Guse have been born two children, Fred and Florence. In his political views Mr. Guse is a democrat and he is a member of the German Lutheran church. The family reside at No. 1124 South Eighth street in a beautiful home which was erected by Mr. Guse’s father. Mr. Guse is well known and highly honored in this city and because of his upright life and honest business principles deserves to he numbered among its prominent residents.

CHARLES GUSTAVESON From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 535 Charles Gustaveson, farmer, Section 17, Manitowoc Rapids Township, has 105 acres of land, sixty-five improved. He was born in south part of Sweden, Dec. 20, 1821, and emigrated to America in 1846. Went to Milwaukee and enlisted in Co. F, 15th Reg. U. S. Vols., in Spring 1847 and fought in nearly all the principal battles until the capture of Mexico. He was mustered out in Covington, Ky., September, 1848; he returned to Milwaukee and lived a short time, then went to Manitowoc Rapids and took up some land, improved the same and sold it. He worked in a saw mill two years. He was married in April, 1850. He dealt in land for some time. He enlisted a company of Scandinavians in Fall, 1861, and was mustered in Jan. 14, 1862, and got a commission as captain of Co. F, 15th Wis. Vol. He was at the bombardment of Island No. 10, and at taking of Union City, Ky., and at battles of Perrysville, Ky., and Murfreesboro, and was wounded in his foot, was in field hospital a short time. He soon joined his regiment, and was taken prisoner in battle of Chickamauga, and was held one year and ten days in the prisons of Libby, Danville, Macon Ga, and Charleston, South Carolina. He liberated himself and escaped in company with a comrade. He afterward joined his regiment and went to Chattanooga, from there to Bridgeport, and served until Jan. 14, 1864, and was mustered out at Chattanooga, Tenn. He returned to his home. He was appointed deputy provost marshal for Kewaunee County, and held the same until the office was abolished, he has been Supervisor four years in succession and was Under Sheriff one term. He now draws a pension. His wife's maiden name was Miss Amber S. Stephenson, she was born in Norway March 1, 1827. They have eight children living - Anna C., Mary E., Gustavus A., Christina C., Charles A., Emma C., Herman and Albertina.

LOUIS GUTHEIL From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 540 Louis Gutheil, of the firm of Gutheil & Brothers, brewers, Kiel, was born Aug. 31, 1842, in Saxony, Germany. In 1846, he came with his parents to Washington County; the family removed to Kiel in 1856, and about three years later they built this brewery. He enlisted in 1861 in Company A, 9th Wis. I.; served three years. He then returned to Chicago, where he remained about one year. In 1866, he returned to Kiel, and has since been engaged in this business. He was married in 1874, to Johanna Ree, of New Holstein. ************** JOHANNA GUTHEIL Mrs. J. Gutheil Buried Monday Kiel Relatives, Friends Attend New Holstein Services Funeral services for Mrs. Johanna Gutheil, who passed away at her home in Port Edwards Friday of last week at the age of 75, were held at New Holstein Monday of this week, the Rev. A. George Schmid performing the last rites. Kiel people who attended the services were Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Laun, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Heins, Miss Minnie Heins, Mrs. Jessie Mathes, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Ammann, Mrs. Peter Arnold, and Mrs. Edwin Fluhr. The deceased, nee Ree, was born in Fond du Lac May 15, 1853, and when still a child moved to a farm west of New Holstein with her parents. Later they made their home in Schleswig, where Mr. Ree built what is now the H. Buettner and Son store. She was married to Louis Gutheil of Kiel in July, 1874. The couple lived here for a number of years, Mr. Gutheil operating a brewery, on the site of the former Emil Reichart home north of the Brooklyn hall, with his brother Bernhard. Since the death of her husband in 1902 she had made her home at Port Edwards. Mrs. Gutheil was buried beside her husband in the New Holstein cemetery. Until last year his remains had lain in the Rockville cemetery, but they were transferred to New Holstein. An unusually large number of people were in attendance for the services, among them relatives and acquaintances from Milwaukee, Manitowoc, and Fond du Lac. One of her friends from Fond du Lac, a lady of 82, was present. Surviving her in the immediate family are Mrs. John Veers of New Holstein. and Mrs. Frank McGonigle of Port Edwards, sisters, and a brother, Siegfried Ree of Milwaukee. (No newspaper named, March 20, 1930)

JOHN GUTMAN This is a bio. sketch from "History of Manitowoc County Wisconsin" by Dr. L. Falge, 1911-1912, v.2, p.476-477. John Gutman, the proprietor of the Lake View hotel at St. Nazianz, has passed his life to the present time in Manitowoc county, of which he is a native, his birth having occurred in Liberty township on the 12th of May, 1862. He is a son of Cornelius and Gustina (Wiesler) Gutman, natives of Germany, the father having been born and reared in Freiburg. Together with his wife and four children Mr. Gutman emigrated to the United States, locating in Manitowoc county during the pioneer days. Here he acquired a farm in the vicinity of St. Nazianz which he cultivated until his death in 1892, at the age of sixty—eight years. The mother survived him until 1896, her death occurring after she had passed the seventy—second anniversary of her birth. They were the parents of seven children, four of whom are deceased. Those living besides our subject are as follows: Joseph, who is a resident of St. Nazianz; and Amelia, the wife of Paul Charmbruch, of Brillion, Wisconsin. The early years in the life of John Gutman were passed amid the pioneer conditions that yet prevailed in Manitowoc county. He attended the district schools and assisted his father with the work of the fields and care of the stock until he was ten years of age, after which his entire time and attention were devoted to the work of the farm. As the years passed he assumed more and more of the responsibility connected with the operation of the homestead and eventually became owner of the property. His long years of experience united with intelligent observation made him a most efficient and capable agriculturist, and he prospered in his undertakings. In connection with his general farming he engaged in stockraising and dairying, making a specialty of the two latter occupations, both of which proved to be very lucrative. Agricultural pursuits engaged his energies until 1909, when he disposed of his farm and removed to St. Nazianz and purchased the Lake View hotel, which is located opposite St. Gregory's church. He is conducting a very good hotel, and is being accorded an excellent patronage, his place being particularly popular with residents in this section of the county. In 1884 Mr. Gutman was united in marriage to Miss Christina Phefferle, who was born in Eaton township, Manitowoc county, in 1861, and passed away on her husbands farm on July 6, 1906. Mrs. Gutman was a daughter of Phelix and Walburka Phefferle, prominent pioneer farming people of Eaton township, where they lived for many years. After the death of her mother, Mrs. Gutman remained at home and kept house for her father until her marriage, and now her father is also deceased. She was reared in the Roman Catholic faith and always took an active interest in the work of the various organizations of the church, particularly the ladies society. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gutman, three of whom are deceased. In order of birth the others are as follows: Lena, who is twenty—six years of age, now keeping house for her father; Clara, who is twentv—five; William, a blacksmith, who is eighteen; and Mina, who is sixteen. They are all living at home. The father and children are all communicants of the Catholic church, being members of St. Gregory’s parish, and he is a member of the Knights of Columbus and is one of the trustees of the local organization. His political support he gives to the democratic party, and he has served for two terms as supervisor in Liberty township. Mr. Gutman is widely known in Manitowoc county, where he enjoys the respect and esteem of a large circle of acquaintances, the majority of whom have known him since early boyhood.

H. GUTTMANN From The History of Northern Wisconsin, Vol II. Chicago: Western Historical Pub. Co., 1881, p. 527 Manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddles and collars, Manitowoc, was born April 19, 1831 in Prussia. In 1856, he came to Two Rivers. He was employed by the Wisconsin Leather Company for three years, when he moved to Manitowoc, and ran a tannery till 1876. In 1870, he opened a leather store, and two years later he added harness making to his other business. He has been Alderman two terms. In 1858, he married Miss A. Bertram, a native of Prussia, by whom he has seven children, five sons and two daughters.

J.F. GUYLES From the Manitowoc Pilot, JANUARY 27, 1870 Runaways - A horse belonging to Mr. J.F. GUYLES, and being driven by one of his sons, on last Thursday morning, turned a corner too short, and the cutter in slewing frightened the horse, causing him to start off at a fearful rate of speed, capsizing the cutter, and spilling its contents. Fortunately no one was hurt seriously. Go slow, George, around the corners.